Wednesday Sep 02, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #4:Enable The Humans

We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. We previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last time I wrote about requirement #3: why usage and context patterns of information are so important.
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This week we continue the series investigating requirement #4 where we change gears a bit and move from our previous automation focus and consider the humans. After all it is we-the-meat that actually create and use information. It is the meat part of life which can transmogrify data to information to knowledge to action. So our topic is how and why human revisions of information, annotations to and classifications of information must be enabled and preserved.
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Friday Aug 28, 2009

5 Reasons to Integrate Your WCM System with Social Media Sites/Services

Many organizations still approach social media with a mix of trepidation and curiosity that can either foster experimentation or dismiss this inevitable evolution of information interaction as a fad. But this mindset misses the safety and incrementalism inherent in any evolutionary system. It's not all or nothing. To those ends comes a good article from CMS Watch on 5 ways and reasons to integrate your Web Content Management system with Internal and/or External Social Sites. You'll need to click through to read the rationale behind the reasons but here they are... [Read More]

Thursday Aug 20, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #3: Usage & Context Patterns

We are in the midst of a series investigating intentional and accidental collaboration: INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction
cabbage_sm.jpg
While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last week I wrote about requirement #2: why the automated aggregation of content bound data is important. This week we continue the series investigating requirement #3 which continues on the aggregation theme: Usage and context patterns must be able to be automatically created, extracted, enhanced and preserved. It bears repeating that the reason we're spending so much time on aggregation is because it is in the aggregate that patterns and meta-patterns emerge that provide real intelligence that simply cannot be seen when looking at a single object. It is the difference between spotting "striking similarities" in two sets of DNA then pulling back and seeing that one belongs to a person and the other a cabbage. [Read More]

Wednesday Aug 05, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #1: Seamlessly combine human oriented and machine oriented information.

You will recall that I previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction. While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to *intentionally* facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the previous post. Requirement #1 is that Human oriented information (e.g. documents, images) AND machine oriented information (e.g. indexes, transactions) must be *able to be* seamlessly combined.[Read More]

Tuesday Aug 04, 2009

WTF is Social Media - One Year Later

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Tuesday Jul 28, 2009

ECM and E2.0 - Interview by Sameer Patel of Pretzel Logic

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Monday Jul 27, 2009

2 Types of Collaboration & 10 Requirements for Achieving Them

photoMosaic1_sm.png Collaboration comes in two flavors: Accidental and Intentional. Enterprise 2.0 technologies have become very good at facilitating intentional collaboration. They are meeting us where we are at and linking people across distances, across political spectra, and across expertise domains. Examples include the social network sites (I friend you, you friend me), Twitter (I follow you and read your stuff - you follow me and read my stuff) and blogs (I write, you read and comment, I answer and write again). In each case the decision to friend, follow and read are intentional. These technologies mimic human interactions that are as old as humanity - making introductions, updating friends followers fans and disciples and public declamation. [Read More]

Monday Jul 06, 2009

Structured and Unstructured Information in the Enterprise

computer_money.jpg Information is the currency of the enterprise. While we sell products or services, it is information that brokers that transaction. Whether we create reports, devise strategies, or process queues of applications we consume, create and consider information. Enterprise 2.0 technologies and Web 2.0 behavior patterns have not changed any of this. Rather they have augmented the modes and methodologies through which we process information to execute our responsibilities. [Read More]

Thursday Jun 25, 2009

E20 & ECM - On Discipline and Dumps

Enterprise Content Management systems are designed to house human created and consumable information. One of the challenges in recent years that ECM systems have faced is the explosion of content. Web and Enterprise 2.0 systems have lowered the bar to participation on and with the web. Participation in many cases means content creation. We participate in instant message (IM) conversations, we interact in discussion threads, we write blog entries, update wiki entries, and review everything under the sun whether books, movies, music, documents, projects or even each other. Those ratings, wikis, messages and participation are all content. [Read More]

Friday May 29, 2009

Did Trickle Down Business Process Kill the US Automobile Industry? Can Enterprise 2.0 help save Detroit?

gm-ten.jpgLast month I wrote about trickle down business strategy HERE. That post turned into an article on business agility in the post modern economy that published May 18th in the Business Solutions Group InfoWeek Special (in German only, link on lower right). The post itself is part of a much larger forthcoming white paper on business agility that covers Enterprise 2.0 technology, crowd sourcing in the enterprise, communication paradigms, social transmission of information and value, as well as information management and re-use. [Read More]
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