Monday Jan 25, 2010

Content Platform Migration Strategy - Artifacts vs Perishable Content

[Read More]

Monday Nov 23, 2009

Forrester ECM Suites Wave 2009 is OUT NOW

[Read More]

Monday Nov 02, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #6:Data Accessibility for People and Computers

TouchSun.jpg
The data contained within information artifacts must be accessible by people and machines. We will cover 3 main advantages that data accessibility for people and computers deliver. 1. High relevance leads to lean systems. 2. People want relevant information, not potentially relevant hits. 3. Context drives relevancy, delivery drives efficiency. We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. We previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last time I wrote about requirement #5: why data must be referencable and portable. This time we will continue on that theme but discuss why the data we made portable and referencable last time must still be accessible to both people as well as computers. First remember that the data we're talking about is not nicely contained in a row or cell in a traditional relational database. The data we're interested in and that we have been talking about is the data that exists inside documents, web pages, images and other information artifacts. So in one way at least, the information is already human accessible. It is in a document or other information artifact after all. And those are typically created by people for people. Parsed and extracted data that is referencable is still accessible because we do not fundamentally alter the original container (i.e. the document). Any good enterprise information architecture must include a fully-fledged ECM (enterprise content management) system for this reason. There needs to be a place to store the original source documents, images, videos and web pages. Also, computers and systems should have no problem accessing the data that we derived from the artifacts in the previous posts. This is because after the data is parsed, extracted and marked up in the ways we've previously described, it gets stored in a computer referencable system like a database or an RDF store or a linked combination of similar stores and indexes. Computers and systems can access that data (of course assuming network connections are established and maintained). Indeed, many SOA and Service Bus integration layers have been doing similar things for some time. They are able to access transaction, web service and request data and attach it to the brokered request while bringing along original documents and other unstructured information files as payload.
blueShoes.jpg
But did you notice what I just wrote there? The relevant data as well as the containing or supporting unstructured data files are attached to the request and passed around from system to transaction to data store to website. It is the equivalent of carrying around a file cabinet full of stock photos when all I really want is to sort catalog entries on blue shoes. "Blue" is important data that is only accessible by a human looking at a picture. Or, best case, by a computer system that can parse attached metadata assuming that "blue" was entered by a person somewhere further up the line (and not "teal", "aqua", or "navy"). But if a similar SOA request had access to the full complement of parsed and extracted data then it could carry with it only that data that was actually needed rather than the over-full payload it is today. [Read More]

Thursday Oct 22, 2009

Oracle ECM Partner Events - Learn & Achieve

[Read More]

Wednesday Sep 02, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #4:Enable The Humans

We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. We previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last time I wrote about requirement #3: why usage and context patterns of information are so important.
meat.jpg
This week we continue the series investigating requirement #4 where we change gears a bit and move from our previous automation focus and consider the humans. After all it is we-the-meat that actually create and use information. It is the meat part of life which can transmogrify data to information to knowledge to action. So our topic is how and why human revisions of information, annotations to and classifications of information must be enabled and preserved.
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]<script type="text/javascript" src="http://static.zemanta.com/readside/loader.js" defer="defer"></script>
[Read More]

Tuesday Aug 25, 2009

Oracle ECM Partner Fishbowl Brain Mashup Day

[Read More]

Thursday Aug 20, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #3: Usage & Context Patterns

We are in the midst of a series investigating intentional and accidental collaboration: INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction
cabbage_sm.jpg
While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last week I wrote about requirement #2: why the automated aggregation of content bound data is important. This week we continue the series investigating requirement #3 which continues on the aggregation theme: Usage and context patterns must be able to be automatically created, extracted, enhanced and preserved. It bears repeating that the reason we're spending so much time on aggregation is because it is in the aggregate that patterns and meta-patterns emerge that provide real intelligence that simply cannot be seen when looking at a single object. It is the difference between spotting "striking similarities" in two sets of DNA then pulling back and seeing that one belongs to a person and the other a cabbage. [Read More]

Tuesday Jul 28, 2009

ECM and E2.0 - Interview by Sameer Patel of Pretzel Logic

[Read More]

Monday Jul 06, 2009

Structured and Unstructured Information in the Enterprise

computer_money.jpg Information is the currency of the enterprise. While we sell products or services, it is information that brokers that transaction. Whether we create reports, devise strategies, or process queues of applications we consume, create and consider information. Enterprise 2.0 technologies and Web 2.0 behavior patterns have not changed any of this. Rather they have augmented the modes and methodologies through which we process information to execute our responsibilities. [Read More]

Thursday Jun 25, 2009

E20 & ECM - On Discipline and Dumps

Enterprise Content Management systems are designed to house human created and consumable information. One of the challenges in recent years that ECM systems have faced is the explosion of content. Web and Enterprise 2.0 systems have lowered the bar to participation on and with the web. Participation in many cases means content creation. We participate in instant message (IM) conversations, we interact in discussion threads, we write blog entries, update wiki entries, and review everything under the sun whether books, movies, music, documents, projects or even each other. Those ratings, wikis, messages and participation are all content. [Read More]
About

Enterprise 2.0 and Content Management

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today