Monday Aug 30, 2010

Social BPM - Benefits & Getting Started

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Wednesday Mar 10, 2010

WebCenter Spaces 11g - UI Customization

When developing on top of a portal platform to support an intranet or extranet, a portion of the development time is spent adjusting the out-of-box user templates to adjust the look and feel of the platform for your organization. Generally your deployment will not need to look like anything like the sites posted on http://cssremix.com/ or http://www.webcreme.com/, but will meet business needs by adjusting basic elements like navigation, color palate and logo placement. After spending some time doing custom UI development with WebCenter Spaces 11G I have gathered a few tips that I hope can help to speed anyone's efforts to quickly "skin" a WebCenter Spaces deployment. A detailed white paper was released that outlines a technique to quickly update the UI during runtime - http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/webcenter/pdf/owcs_r11120_cust_skins_runtime_wp.pdf. Customizing at "runtime" means using CSS and images to adjust the page layout and feel, which when creatively done can change the pages drastically. WebCenter also allows for detailed templates to manage the placement of major page elements like menus, sidebar, etc, but by adjusting only images and CSS we can end up with something like the custom solution shown below.
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Let's dive right in and take a look at some tools to make our efforts more efficient. [Read More]

Tuesday Nov 24, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #7: Tracking the Change and Evolution of Information

We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. We previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last time I wrote about requirement #6: Data Accessibility for People and Computers. This time we will talk about the importance of keeping track of how the information changes over time.
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No information systems are static. Information is continuously being added, removed and changed in the systems. Even records and governance systems that provide "immutable storage" for information assets are not static when considered from the system view. Accessing the system changes it. If nothing else, a new access record is logged. In many ways such feedback intensive systems are intrinsic to the human experience. It is no wonder that these cybernetic characteristics penetrate our information systems. But we still need to take advantage of them. Consider the simple access log example. We do not merely access the system, we access some information in the system. When we track what item was accessed and graph those accesses over time it changes the information in the context of the system. While the binary information object itself may not be altered, the pattern of access over time yields valuable information. It lets us know that the item is popular, important or unpopular or unimportant. [Read More]

Wednesday Oct 21, 2009

Good Reads

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Wednesday Oct 07, 2009

Taxonomy vs Folksonomy

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Monday Oct 05, 2009

Good Reads to Start Your Week

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Wednesday Sep 02, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #4:Enable The Humans

We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. We previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to intentionally facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last time I wrote about requirement #3: why usage and context patterns of information are so important.
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This week we continue the series investigating requirement #4 where we change gears a bit and move from our previous automation focus and consider the humans. After all it is we-the-meat that actually create and use information. It is the meat part of life which can transmogrify data to information to knowledge to action. So our topic is how and why human revisions of information, annotations to and classifications of information must be enabled and preserved.
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Friday Aug 28, 2009

5 Reasons to Integrate Your WCM System with Social Media Sites/Services

Many organizations still approach social media with a mix of trepidation and curiosity that can either foster experimentation or dismiss this inevitable evolution of information interaction as a fad. But this mindset misses the safety and incrementalism inherent in any evolutionary system. It's not all or nothing. To those ends comes a good article from CMS Watch on 5 ways and reasons to integrate your Web Content Management system with Internal and/or External Social Sites. You'll need to click through to read the rationale behind the reasons but here they are... [Read More]

Friday Aug 14, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #2: Automatic Aggregation

companion cube
We are in the midst of a series investigating collaboration. I previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - intentional and accidental. INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to *intentionally* facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the original post. Last week I wrote about requirement #1: how Human oriented information AND machine oriented information must be *able to be* seamlessly combined.[Read More]

Wednesday Aug 05, 2009

Ten Requirements for Achieving Collaboration #1: Seamlessly combine human oriented and machine oriented information.

You will recall that I previously wrote about the two types of collaboration - INTENTIONAL: where we get together to achieve a goal and ACCIDENTAL: where you interact with something of mine and I am never aware of your interaction. While intentional collaboration is good it is not where the bulk of untapped collaborative potential lies. Accidental collaboration is. But the challenge is to *intentionally* facilitate accidental collaboration. For the full list of 10 requirements see the previous post. Requirement #1 is that Human oriented information (e.g. documents, images) AND machine oriented information (e.g. indexes, transactions) must be *able to be* seamlessly combined.[Read More]
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