Nobel day 5

Things have picked up over here in Stockholm. The rest of the troops have arrived, filling up the Grand Hotel to the best of our ability. My father's been running around to press conferences, interviews, and various preparations. The rest of us only have one or two events each day to keep track of. Thankfully, my father has a personal attendant to make sure he doesn't miss a thing, not that my mom would ever allow such a thing to happen.

On the 6th, there was a small reception at the Nobel museum. They used the opportunity to show an "instructional" video to make sure we all knew how to behave during the ceremony and the reception. My father even signed one of the cafeteria chairs, apparently a tradition at the museum:

It was a real treat to arrive in a limo with dozens of cheering children peering through the windows and waiting to see who got out. My father has even met his adoring fans outside the hotel:

The whole experience is rather surreal. The next day we had a reception for all the science (physics, chemistry, and economics) laureates and their families at the Royal Academy of Science. Besides having the chance to get our whole family together in once place, it was interesting to talk with other families in the same boat. There were a few amusing moments when we were standing with Bob Grubbs and his children, who are all above 6'3" tall (including his daughter Katy), as my father, brother, and myself are all 6'3" or taller. The 7 of us are able to make almost anyone feel incredibly short.

Today was the day of lectures. Besides being hung over from some ill-advised late night wine via room service, these lectures were definitely intended for colleagues, not family members. I'd like to say that I understood my father's lecture, but when you can't pronounce half the words coming out of his mouth, it makes it rather difficult to keep up. At least there were some molecular diagrams that I could pretend to understand, though even those were quite a bit more complex than the ones I learned in high school chemistry.

Of course, Stockholm is a beautiful city. Lots of time is spent walking around the streets and poking our heads in the little shops. Tomorrow we'll try to hit up a few more museums in the little spare time we have.

Comments:

Thanks for the pictures of your Dad. Hasn't changed a bit in the last 15 years. Guess I kind of knew that after Kit's thing for him last year at San Diego ACS. The video of the lecture that he gave at MIT also had the same magic as when I worked for him. Please pass on my regards.-kby P.S. Maybe instead of simple math questions below you can have simple alkylidene questions. I MIGHT be able to do better on those... ;-)

Posted by Kimo B. Yap on December 08, 2005 at 07:58 AM PST #

Hmmmm I read that he's having our cute princess to the table.. ;)

Posted by guest on December 10, 2005 at 01:31 AM PST #

Saw your dad on the live webcast today from the ceremony. Wasn't sure I could pick out your mom anywhere; I know you and Andrew will look different enough I don't stand a chance of picking you out. Oh, his signature on the chair looks the same as always. I knew it well.

Posted by Kimo B. Yap on December 10, 2005 at 07:25 AM PST #

What an awesome blog- too bad you couldn't take photos of your dad walking with the princess- Can't wait to see those! Great meeting you and your family and friends! Can't wait to see the full week's blog. Aloha, Katy

Posted by Katy Grubbs on December 11, 2005 at 04:35 PM PST #

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

Musings about Fishworks, Operating Systems, and the software that runs on them.

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today