Tuesday Dec 10, 2013

A Look Ahead at Global Construction Through 2025

The recently released Global Construction 2025 report, the third in a series of major global studies of the construction and engineering industry published by Global Construction Perspectives and Oxford Economics, provides accurate and reliable forecasts to 2025 for the global construction and engineering industry as well as for key regional and country markets.

Sponsored in part by Oracle, the report estimates the global value of construction output will increase by 75% between 2012 and 2025, with the U.S. among the top three largest construction markets, despite depressed numbers in the last seven years.

Garrett E. Harley, director of Engineering & Construction Strategy for Oracle Primavera, says, “From a global perspective, the long-term investment volume and potential release of capital should make any construction company smile. However, the challenges and lessons exposed in the recent downturn still weigh heavily on the minds of public and private leaders and will continue to shape business strategies for both owners and contractors. It’s imperative that owners, their consultants and their contractors transform their business operations and delivery capabilities to maximize value and reduce risk.”

While the long-term forecast is optimistic, the short term

U.S. economy is expected to expand at a slow, but steady pace of 2.7% over the forecast period, which should reduce the unemployment rate to around 5%, but probably increase the rate of consumer price inflation to around 2.2%. Looking at specific markets, the report estimates that housing and non-housing sectors will grow at about 5%, while infrastructure—which includes transportation, highways, water and waste—will grow at half that rate over the next 12 years. Demand for public sector construction (schools, hospitals, etc.) is likely to increase, due to both the expected increase in the U.S.’s population and the higher proportion of elderly people. The high level of U.S. debt will likely make financing needed public construction work difficult.

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Tuesday Dec 03, 2013

Driving a Shared Vision with Enterprise Project Portfolio Management

Written by: Guy Barlow, Director of Industry Strategy at Oracle Primavera

“Write that down!” the CIO of an Indian Oil & Gas company exclaimed. Honestly I was caught off-guard when he hollered this to his reports during our discussion. So what was he so excited about? Simply put, he saw how his team could provide a solution to improve a key business metric; a single number that could not only strengthen the business but also his team’s relationship with operations. Not a bad thing.enterprise project portfolio management best practices

A shared vision, that’s what it is really all about. When an IT leader understands the key business metrics they can instill those metrics in their team to forge the much-needed connectivity between IT and business. The CIO was making a point to ensure his team “got it”. He certainly did.

In our client interactions we’re seeing a rapidly growing trend towards this shared vision and purpose. In some cases it’s by proactive design – the CIO comes from the business – or in others it’s borne out of a reaction to market necessities, like a declining share price, poorer KPIs, or regulatory scrutiny. Crises are great catalysts for initiating change. Similarly, the infusion of technology-thinking into the business is making for much more savvy executives on the operational side of things. In the end this is all good.

So what does this have to do with enterprise project portfolio management (EPPM)? As it turns out, quite a lot. Whether it’s a failed IT implementation for a bank, a cost blowout for a petrochemical facility or a late-to-market delivery of a new vehicle, these are all critical initiatives to the performance of their respective businesses. And guess what? They’re projects – big, small, complex, simple, local, and global. Manage them, by aligning technology and business, and you’re managing your enterprise more effectively.

This link between technology, the business and EPPM is naturally of keen interest to our clients and us. The ability to drive transformational change through greater innovation, efficient operations, a heightened risk and financial management approach is top of mind. Composed of business leaders and academics, the EPPM Board* was formed to explore these types of ideas and communicate to business leaders some of the latest thinking and innovation via research and thought leadership.

Take some time to review these reports generated from the EPPM Board; Hedging your Bets, Stock Shock and In the Firing Line and I guarantee you’ll “get it” too. And more is on the way. Enjoy.

P.S. So what was that number the CIO was interested in? What generated the excitement was, LPO, or lost production opportunity, and for the energy sector it’s a powerful metric. If a facility is down for maintenance it’s not making money. EPPM can reduce maintenance time via a number of areas and by doing so you reduce LPO…and increase revenue.

*The EPPM Board is a prestigious international steering group from Oracle. It brings together senior figures from leading organizations to discuss the business critical role of Enterprise Project Portfolio Management (EPPM) and establish how the challenge can be better tackled from the top.

Tuesday Nov 26, 2013

Enabling Public Sector Efficiency, Transparency

Written by: Paul Bender – Director, Public Administration Strategy, Oracle Primavera

Whether focused on infrastructure, public safety, healthcare or education, public sector organizations face some common and complex challenges in today’s environment, most related to limited funding, oversight and transparency and the increasing and immediate demand to construct new or upgrade existing systems and services.

Public sector entities—and their engineering and construction consultants— must find ways to operate within the given budgets while still meeting the growing needs of constituents.

These entities must answer pointed questions: Given the present budget environment, how does a public works agency determine which program(s) to terminate or downsize to avoid minimal disruption to citizen services? How can an airport authority develop better program oversight and transparency? Is a university system able to model program and portfolio risk so it can create contingency plans? Are there ways that every public entity can reduce waste and inefficiency through better contractor/vendor management? project management best practices in the public sector

No doubt, technology tools can help. Today’s program management solutions, in particular, can help any organization determine where to invest capital that drives greater constituent or agency value, captures inventory for projects and programs, provides oversight for mission objectives…or all of the above.

Program management technology is an enabler designed to improve strategic investment decisions around resource allocation and maintenance. It’s the foundation for facilitating the three strategic drivers—financial discipline, operational efficiency and risk management—that characterize the success of any business regardless of size, scope or market segment. Using technology to enable these three strategic drivers will drive better coordination, compliance and control so that public sector entities and their E&C teams can meet the demands of constituents, stakeholders and regulators in a timely, affordable manner.

Already airport authorities, transportation agencies, universities, healthcare systems and public works organizations have applied program management solutions to make the most of limited funding, meet oversight and transparency metrics and reduce waste and inefficiency.

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Monday Oct 28, 2013

The Rise of Project Intelligence and Why It Matters

By Amy DeWolf

Are you doing any of these in your organization? How are you leveraging historical data to forecast projects?

There’s a lot going on in government today. The economic pressures agencies feel from the uncertainty of budget cuts and sequestration effect every part of an organization, including the Project Management Office (PMOPMO Best practices).  The PMO is responsible for monitoring and administering government IT projects. As time goes on, priorities shift, technology advances, and new regulations are imposed, all of which make planning and executing projects more difficult.  For example, think about your own projects.  How many boxes do you need to check and hoops do you need to jump through to ensure you comply with new regulations? While new regulations and technology advancements can be a good thing, they add an additional layer of complexity to already complex projects.

To overcome some of these pressures, particularly new regulations, many in the PMO world are adopting a new approach- Project Intelligence (PI). According to a new Oracle Primavera white paper, The Rise of Project Intelligence: When Project Management is Just Not Enough“PI uses Business Intelligence methods to leverage historical project data to make more informed decisions and greatly enhance project execution.”

Currently, project managers plan and forecast the possible phases in an execution cycle.  However, most project managers don’t have the proper tools to do this as effectively as they would like. As the white paper noted, “The underlying deficiencies in most forecasting approaches are that 1) the PM fails in most instances to leverage historical data and 2) the PM doesn’t employ current Business Intelligence tools.” PI seeks to overturn this by combining modeling tools used in Business Intelligence for projects with the understanding of Emotional Intelligence for managing people.  

  • Simply put, Project Intelligence is built off four main pillars:
  • Actively use historical data to forecast project cycles
  • Understand the intricacies of complex projects
  • Enhance social and emotional intelligence in projects
  • Actively use Business intelligence tools

Read our complimentary whitepaper and discover the importance of emotional intelligence and best practices for improving projects, specifically in terms of communication.

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