Wednesday Feb 12, 2014

Strategic P&L Statements and Opportunities for Improvement in Retail

Do you have strategic profit and loss statements for your customers, stores, and stock keeping units (SKUs) or products? Having little experience with this type of statement before, I was very fortunate to have two experts join me for a discussion about how strategic profit and loss statements can make a significant bottom line impact for Retail companies. Mark Wright, Principal Sales Consultant for Oracle EPM Applications and Bart Stoehr, Senior Director of Product Strategy Development, both specialize in the Oracle Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management Product. Both have an amazing depth of experience to share on all matters pertaining to profitability and cost management practices.

To start, I asked Mark to describe shortcomings he has seen in Retail company management practices. Mark explained that for decades retailers have been tasked to improve shareholder value by making decisions based on statutory financial statements and rarely do these mandated statements represent strategic views that embody the business.  Marketing, sales and operations often have to recreate their financials to better serve their decision needs.  Mark offered that “financial” profit and loss statements are generated from ERP systems designed to meet statutory reporting requirements, not the needs of strategic executives. Transactions are recorded in accounting structures by division, department and account with little linkage to profit dimensions such as customer, product, and vendor. When a customer pays for a product, key hidden expenses such as labor, warehouse, transportation, vendor, etc., are recorded in unrelated and separate accounting formats. This lack of linkage and transparency can lead to incomplete, inefficient and sometimes bad decisions.

Mark told us about a company that he had worked with that completely changed their product strategic direction by switching from product and SKU gross margin management to strategic profit and loss statements. This change resulted in driving .5% to 2.5 % profit points to the bottom line!

Diving deeper into this subject area, Mark relayed that marketing executives want to know where to make money so they can plan advertising budgets.  Sales organizations focus more on who is buying so they can set sales targets and quotas. Operational managers focus on what and how so they can balance supply to demand. Merchandisers focus on store floors and aisles so they can plan.  Corporate level executives just want to know when so they can set profit expectations.  Everyone wants different views of profitability.



Mark offered a good example of how a mistake can be made from too little information. Merchandisers want to turn over high volume products but likely don’t understand the hidden costs associated with them such as import fees and distribution costs.  Sales may want to push high revenue products to high volume customers even though the customer may be unprofitable because they tend to buy massive loss-leading products. These are very conflicting agendas and objectives and will not lead to profitability.

Bart provided good insight as to how Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management can transform traditional profitability information into strategic profit and loss reporting, giving execs and others the information they need to make good decisions. “Imagine an executive in your company pulling up a dashboard that has four different points of view into the same profit number”, Bart said. Views such as customer, product, channel (i.e. store), and warehouse all tying to the same bottom line with each view showing a color coded profit graph with the most and least profitable members. Continuing the story, the executive then clicks on the negative portion of the product graph and it displays an independent strategic profit and loss statement showing revenue, discounts, rebates, vendor costs, warehouse costs, transportation costs, store activity costs, cogs and negative income - all fully loaded with transparency and linkage to profit drivers such as quantity, activities, allocations, and other inter-dependencies.  

That sounded like utopia for executives, but Bart kept going…Now imagine further drilling into the strategic profit and loss  report and getting details on the store, SKU, vendor, customer, sales person, zip code, store isle and other profit measures important to decision making. I was hooked!

Bart told our listeners that this is just the tip of the iceberg.  This type of tool can also address:

SKU rationalization
Inventory reduction
Vendor negotiations
Bulk & benchmarking
Customer targeted marketing
Market basket & behaviors; sales incentives
Pricing & policy
Cost plus margin and minimum orders
Capital expense alignment
Return on Investment (ROI) alignment
Operating Expense resource alignment
Capacity and process improvements

I was amazed at the power of strategic profit and loss statements for executives. So you really need to ask yourself, “Can my profit and loss statements do all this?"

To listen to the entire podcast, click here.
To learn more about Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management, click here.

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