Disconnect between Business and IT

Interesting blog by Dr. Jim Anderson on disconnects between business and IT and how some companies are getting rid of the CIO position completely. Dr. Jim believes that this is caused by misalignment between business and IT on goals/priorities and business not realizing the true value of what IT does.
 
CIOs In Crisis: Do we have a problem here?
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CIOs In Crisis: Do we have a problem here?

Enterprise Architecture aims at addressing this very issue by:

  • Implementing a common language (Business architecture) and formal communication process for business and IT to communicate
  • Establishing mutually agreed upon goals and priorities with a good understanding of the value they deliver to the business
  • Implementing a governance model that monitors and provides course correction
  • Establishing concrete measurements to communicate the value IT is delivering to the business
Could the CIOs discussed in the blog face a different outcome if they had adopted EA? I sure think so..
What do you think?






Comments:

If the notion is that EA can eliminate the CIO position then I think it could also eliminate other senior business executives as well. I don't think I agree with the notion roles would be displaced but enhanced and improved since the goal of EA is to improve the enterprise. I do think that EA can eliminate the disconnect between business and IT. I've heard that in some successful organizations, IT is not represented in EA governance. EA is an effective corporate tool ; not a role IMHO

Posted by Paul Naish on February 28, 2010 at 01:14 AM EST #

I couldn't find the blog you reference from Jim Anderson. Can you please provide the citation? Thanks

Posted by Paul Naish on February 28, 2010 at 01:19 AM EST #

Paul: What I'm saying is the exact opposite. I'm saying "IF" they had adapted EA, the business and the CEO would have had a better understanding of what IT does for them and appreciate its role in the enterprise. I have updated the original entry with another link to the blog I referenced. It does not require a login to LinkedIn. Thanks for your comments!

Posted by Pratul Sharma on February 28, 2010 at 03:15 AM EST #

Hello, IT as a business enabler is a forgone conclusion. The position of IT as the business driver is what is getting emphasis now.IT is not what makes some businesses run , rather IT is what makes the business itself function the way it is. To cite some examples, EBAY,Google,AT & T and the more familiar auto makers are looking big time on IT. Your not too old mom and pop shops have made way for Walmart and other big retailers. You could argue that Google is an IT company.My personal opinion is Google is a search engine.It uses IT to power its searches and thus bring in AD revenue. Here in India , we have telecoms companies relying heavily on IT.How many silicon components are making way to all the different industries is just phenomenal. Kanti

Posted by Kanti on February 28, 2010 at 04:29 PM EST #

Kanti: Your comments are spot on! Unfortunately, business and IT don't spend enough time together to appreciate what one does for the other. The examples cited in the article I references, are far too common. Like the author of that article eluded, IT needs to do a better job of communicating what they are doing to help the business AND aligning their (ITs) priorities with them (Business). How many times do you see IT focus on cool projects that provide little or no value (perceived or real) to the business? Thanks for your comments! Regards, Pratul

Posted by Pratul Sharma on March 15, 2010 at 12:47 PM EDT #

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