Thursday May 31, 2012

The Application Architecture Domain

I have been spending a lot of time thinking about Application Architecture in the context of EA. More specifically, as an Enterprise Architect, what do I need to consider when looking at/defining/designing the Application Architecture Domain?

There are several definitions of Application Architecture. TOGAF says “The objective here [in Application Architecture] is to define the major kinds of application system necessary to process the data and support the business”. FEA says the Application Architecture “Defines the applications needed to manage the data and support the business functions”.

I agree with these definitions. They reflect what the Application Architecture domain does. However, they need to be decomposed to be practical.

I find it useful to define a set of views into the Application Architecture domain. These views reflect what an EA needs to consider when working with/in the Applications Architecture domain. These viewpoints are, at a high level:

Capability View: This view reflects how applications alignment with business capabilities. It is a super set of the following views when viewed in aggregate. By looking at the Application Architecture domain in terms of the business capabilities it supports, you get a good perspective on how those applications are directly supporting the business.

Technology View: The technology view reflects the underlying technology that makes up the applications. Based on the number of rationalization activities I have seen (more specifically application rationalization), the phrase “complexity equals cost” drives the importance of the technology view, especially when attempting to reduce that complexity through standardization type activities. Some of the technology components to be considered are:
  • Software: The application itself as well as the software the application relies on to function (web servers, application servers).
  • Infrastructure: The underlying hardware and network components required by the application and supporting application software.
  • Development: How the application is created and maintained. This encompasses development components that are part of the application itself (i.e. customizable functions), as well as bolt on development through web services, API’s, etc. The maintenance process itself also falls under this view.
  • Integration: The interfaces that the application provides for integration as well as the integrations to other applications and data sources the application requires to function.
  • Type: Reflects the kind of application (mash-up, 3 tiered, etc). (Note: functional type [CRM, HCM, etc.] are reflected under the capability view).

Organization View: Organizations are comprised of people and those people use applications to do their jobs. Trying to define the application architecture domain without taking the organization that will use/fund/change it into consideration is like trying to design a car without thinking about who will drive it (i.e. you may end up building a formula 1 car for a family of 5 that is really looking for a minivan). This view reflects the people aspect of the application. It includes:
  • Ownership: Who ‘owns’ the application? This will usually reflect primary funding and utilization but not always.
  • Funding: Who funds both the acquisition/creation as well as the on-going maintenance (funding to create/change/operate)?
  • Change: Who can/does request changes to the application and what process to the follow?
  • Utilization: Who uses the application, how often do they use it, and how do they use it?
  • Support: Which organization is responsible for the on-going support of the application?

Information View: Whether or not you subscribe to the view that “information drives the enterprise”, it is a fact that information is critical. The management, creation, and organization of that information are primary functions of enterprise applications. This view reflects how the applications are tied to information (or at a higher level – how the Application Architecture domain relates to the Information Architecture domain). It includes:
  • Access: The application is the mechanism by which end users access information. This could be through a primary application (i.e. CRM application), or through an information access type application (a BI application as an example).
  • Creation: Applications create data in order to provide information to end-users. (I.e. an application creates an order to be used by an end-user as part of the fulfillment process).
  • Consumption: Describes the data required by applications to function (i.e. a product id is required by a purchasing application to create an order.

Application Service View: Organizations today are striving to be more agile. As an EA, I need to provide an architecture that supports this agility. One of the primary ways to achieve the required agility in the application architecture domain is through the use of ‘services’ (think SOA, web services, etc.). Whether it is through building applications from the ground up utilizing services, service enabling an existing application, or buying applications that are already ‘service enabled’, compartmentalizing application functions for re-use helps enable flexibility in the use of those applications in support of the required business agility. The applications service view consists of:
  • Services: Here, I refer to the generic definition of a service “a set of related software functionalities that can be reused for different purposes, together with the policies that should control its usage”.
  • Functions: The activities within an application that are not available / applicable for re-use. This view is helpful when identifying duplication functions between applications that are not service enabled.

Delivery Model View: It is hard to talk about EA today without hearing the terms ‘cloud’ or shared services.  Organizations are looking at the ways their applications are delivered for several reasons, to reduce cost (both CAPEX and OPEX), to improve agility (time to market as an example), etc.  From an EA perspective, where/how an application is deployed has impacts on the overall enterprise architecture. From integration concerns to SLA requirements to security and compliance issues, the Enterprise Architect needs to factor in how applications are delivered when designing the Enterprise Architecture. This view reflects how applications are delivered to end-users. The delivery model view consists of different types of delivery mechanisms/deployment options for applications:
  • Traditional: Reflects non-cloud type delivery options. The most prevalent consists of an application running on dedicated hardware (usually specific to an environment) for a single consumer.
  • Private Cloud: The application runs on infrastructure provisioned for exclusive use by a single organization comprising multiple consumers.
  • Public Cloud: The application runs on infrastructure provisioned for open use by the general public.
  • Hybrid: The application is deployed on two or more distinct cloud infrastructures (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities, but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability.

While by no means comprehensive, I find that applying these views to the application domain gives a good understanding of what an EA needs to consider when effecting changes to the Application Architecture domain.

Finally, the application architecture domain is one of several architecture domains that an EA must consider when developing an overall Enterprise Architecture. The Oracle Enterprise Architecture Framework defines four Primary domains: Business Architecture, Application Architecture, Information Architecture, and Technology Architecture.

Oracle Enterprise Architecture Framework

Each domain links to the others either directly or indirectly at some point. Oracle links them at a high level as follows:

Business Capabilities and/or Business Processes (Business Architecture), links to the Applications that enable the capability/process (Applications Architecture – COTS, Custom), links to the Information Assets managed/maintained by the Applications (Information Architecture), links to the technology infrastructure upon which all this runs (Technology Architecture - integration, security, BI/DW, DB infrastructure, deployment model).

There are however, times when the EA needs to narrow focus to a particular domain for some period of time. These views help me to do just that.

Wednesday May 30, 2012

Who should ‘own’ the Enterprise Architecture?

I recently had a discussion around who should own an organization’s Enterprise Architecture. It was spawned by an article titled “Busting CIO Myths” in CIO magazine1 where the author interviewed Jeanne Ross, director of MIT's Center for Information Systems Research and co-author of books on enterprise architecture, governance and IT value.

In the article Jeanne states that companies need to acknowledge that "architecture says everything about how the company is going to function, operate, and grow; the only person who can own that is the CEO". "If the CEO doesn't accept that role, there really can be no architecture."

The first question that came up when talking about ownership was whether you are talking about a person, role, or organization (there are pros and cons to each, but in general, I like to assign accountability to as few people as possible). After much thought and discussion, I came to the conclusion that we were answering the wrong question. Instead of talking about ownership we were talking about responsibility and accountability, and the answer varies depending on the particular role of the organization’s Enterprise Architecture and the activities of the enterprise architect(s).

Instead of looking at just who owns the architecture, think about what the person/role/organization should do. This is one possible scenario (thanks to Bob Covington):
  • The CEO should own the Enterprise Strategy which guides the business architecture.
  • The Business units should own the business processes and information which guide the business, application and information architectures.
  • The CIO should own the technology, IT Governance and the management of the application and information architectures/implementations.
  • The EA Governance Team owns the EA process.  If EA is done well, the governance team consists of both IT and the business.

While there are many more roles and responsibilities than listed here, it starts to provide a clearer understanding of ‘ownership’. Now back to Jeanne’s statement that the CEO should own the architecture. If you agree with the statement about what the architecture is (and I do agree), then ultimately the CEO does need to own it.

However, what we ended up with was not really ownership, but more statements around roles and responsibilities tied to aspects of the enterprise architecture. You can debate the semantics of ownership vs. responsibility and accountability, but in the end the important thing is to come to a clearer understanding that is easily communicated (and hopefully measured) around the question “Who owns the Enterprise Architecture”.

The next logical step . . . create a RACI matrix that details the findings . . . but that is a step that each organization needs to do on their own as it will vary based on current EA maturity, company culture, and a variety of other factors.

Who ‘owns’ the Enterprise Architecture in your organization?

1 CIO Magazine Article (Busting CIO Myths): http://www.cio.com/article/704943/Busting_CIO_Myths

Thursday May 24, 2012

Complexity of Social Computing - Is it a Consideration for EA's?

In this "insane graphic" featured in an article in Business Insider's article titled "This INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now" - opened my eyes to just how large the Social Computing Landscape really is (apparently Pintrest is not on this chart - imagine that?!?).  So, my quetion to folks out there is: does EA need to consider Social Computing in it's scope???  I have yet to see much discussion about thisbut think it NEEDS to be part of the puzzle.  I will think this through some more and do another post, but welcome ideas or feedback.

 

Social Media Map

To read more, the article is posted here: http://www.businessinsider.com/social-media-marketing-landscape-complicated-2012-5?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+businessinsider+%28Business+Insider%29

Thursday May 17, 2012

Mobileize Your Business Process Applications

Mobileize Your BPM Applications

Recently, there has been a lot more talk about mobilizing corporate applications.  One of the customers that I work with wanted to know how they can mobilize their BPM applications.  There are a couple ways to do this.  Here are two different approaches (using ADF Mobile and/or Actionable Emails):

1. ADF Mobile:
a. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/adf/overview/adf-mobile-096323.html
b. (Datasheet) http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/jdev/adf-mobile-development-129800.pdf
c. (Documentation) http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E26098_01/web.1112/e16178/toc.htm

2. Actionable Emails: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E12839_01/integration.1111/e10224/bp_workflow.htm

 Figured that might help some people understand how you can mobilize your work force.

Monday May 14, 2012

BPM Process Accelerator Packs

 

 

ToolsTools

In as much as EA is about simplifying, streamlining and consolidating business processes, pre-built business processes can be very useful to lower the barriers to adoption of BPM-thinking.  That is to say, having the architecture and Business/IT allignment where the question asked is NOT "gosh, should we automate these new processes or reengineer some of these old manual-intensive processes?"   Hence, a shamless, but worthwhile plug for BPM Process Accelerators (or PA's for short) that were just recently announced.  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/bpm/learnmore/processaccelerators-1609559.html

The first two are out with others on their way:

Travel Request Management (TRM) User Guide UPK (PDF)
Document Routing & Approval (DRA) User Guide UPK (PDF)


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Art, Artifacts, and Best Practices for Enterprise Architects

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