Monday Jul 21, 2014

Getting the most out of WLDF Part 3: Notifications by C2B2

his blog directly follows on from part 2 on watches, so if you haven’t already read that then you should probably go and do that now. You can still create notifications without having any watches configured; you just won’t receive anything on them. In the last post, I had created two watches, one Server Log watch and one Collected Metrics watch. In this post, I will create notifications to work with these watches.

What are notifications?
WLDF notifications are nothing more than a particular configuration for alerting based on a condition. Think of them as channels of communication; unless something is sent down those channels, they will stay empty. The forms that these channels can take are:

  • SMTP Email
  • JMS Message
  • Diagnostic Image
  • JMX Notification
  • SNMP Trap

Which notification should I use?
There’s no right or wrong when it comes to choosing notification methods, but there is certainly annoying and non-annoying! Of the notification methods above, all but email are passive methods of alerting people concerned. The reason I classify them as passive is that you, as the end-user who wants to be notified, must perform some sort of action to consume that notification. For example, to consume JMS message data, you must use a JMS client and would likely process the data automatically, perhaps for graphing. Read the complete article here.

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Friday May 16, 2014

Getting the most out of WLDF Part 2: Watches by C2B2

In this post, I'll be looking at using watches in WLDF.
What is a watch? A watch, at its most basic, is simply a way to monitor one of three things:

  • MBeans
  • A server log
  • Instrumentation (event) data

To configure an instrumentation watch, you first need to know what instrumentation is, and how to instrument applications or servers, so we’ll put that to one side for now. A server log watch is exactly that - a watch to monitor the server log for anything you want! For example, all Critical severity log entries, entries which mention a particular server or particular log message IDs. An MBean watch relies on the Harvester to collect server runtime MBean metrics which does not need to be configured separately for your watch to work, but do bear in mind that the data gathered will not be archived unless you configure the Harvester properly:

Note:
If you define a watch rule to monitor an MBean (or MBean attributes) that the Harvester is not configured to harvest, the watch will work. The Harvester will "implicitly" harvest values to satisfy the requirements set in the defined watch rules. However, data harvested in this way (that is, implicitly for a watch) will not be archived. See Chapter 7, "Configuring the Harvester for Metric Collection," for more information about the Harvester.

How do I make a watch? I’ve already mentioned that Instrumentation watches require a little understanding of instrumentation first, so I won’t cover them here. If you’re already familiar with instrumentation, then configuring watches for your instrumented applications isn’t too tricky.

Step 1: Create a Diagnostic Module The first step in creating watches is always the same. In the Domain Structure pane, select “Diagnostic Modules” under the “Diagnostics” entry.

Select a diagnostic module if you’ve created one, or create a new one if not. Since creating a new module only requires you to name it (and provide an optional description), you’ll need to configure it once you’ve created it. The most important thing to do is to target it to the server you want to monitor. Read the complete article here.

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Thursday Apr 17, 2014

Getting the most out of WLDF Part 1: What is the WLDF? By Mike Croft

The WebLogic Diagnostic Framework (WLDF) is an often overlooked feature of WebLogic which can be very powerful when configured properly. If it’s so great, then why aren’t more people using it?

I can’t give a firm answer to that, but I suspect that the answer is likely because WLDF is so large, so comprehensive, and so terrifying to the uninitiated! There are a lot of concepts to get your head round before you can make good use of it, such that people frequently don’t bother. After all, where do you start with something so big?
In this blog, I hope to remedy that feeling a little, by pointing out some of the low-hanging fruit so you can get to know enough of the basics that you’ll be able to make use of some of the features, while having enough of a knowledge of the framework to take things further yourself.

What can I get out of it?
WLDF, according to the documentation, lets you “create, collect, analyse, archive and access diagnostic data generated by a running server and the applications deployed within its containers.”

To get all that functionality into WebLogic, Oracle has implemented lots of different components as part of the WLDF service including:

Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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