Thursday May 05, 2016

Mobile Cloud Service 3 Days Workshop in Madrid by Rubén Rodríguez Santiago

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Last week I had the chance to attend a Mobile Cloud Service 3 days workshop in Madrid. This was the first MCS training in Spain where some partners and I were able to get a good insight about what MCS offers and also a complete hands-on.
If you want to know MCS functionality you can check my previous post: Oracle Mobile Cloud Service overview.

Although I already attended Oracle Summer Camps workshop in Lisbon, we are in the middle of a MCS development and  this workshop was a perfect fit for mastering my MCS skills and also any question we made was perfectly answer by Mireille Duroussaud (Senior Principal Product Manager).
We were also able to see some of the features that will bring the next versions of Mobile Cloud Service like Mobile Application Accelerator (Oracle MAX), and hear of others like for example a JavaScript editor for implementing and debugging APIs right in the browser.

I was really impressed about Oracle MAX becasue building a Mobile Application connected to Mobile Cloud Service was just a matter of 10 minutes. Although the things you can do with Oracle MAX are limitted, it is likely possible that we will be able to donwload the source code of the generated application to extend it wich is a nice feature. Read the complete article here. Want to attend a MCS training close to you? Visit our WebLogic & Developer Community training calendar here (Community membership required).

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Thursday Apr 28, 2016

Deployment of a Java EE application to Java Cloud Service (Oracle Public Cloud JCS) by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002In this previous articleGetting started with Java Cloud Service on the Oracle Public Cloud (WebLogic as a Service) – I have taken  you on a introductory tour into JCS. That article describes how to get going – how to provision a JCS instance – associated with an instance in DBaaS and with backup set up with Storage CS.

In the article you are currently reading, I show you how to use this instance for deploying a Java EE application onto – and subsequently invoking that application.

Since the same consoles are available to us with JCS as with on premises WLS, we can perform an application deployment in the same way from the console by uploading a WAR or EAR file as we can do on premises. I tried my hand at a fairly large application – without any Java EE dependencies (no EJB, JMS or JDBC data source requirements): the ADF Faces Rich Client components Demo application – available from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/adf/downloads/index.html . The downloaded file is about 105 MB. The subsequent deployment of this file to JCS fails: the step takes quite long – because 105 MB have to be uploaded again, from my laptop into the Oracle Public Cloud. This console could be extended by Oracle perhaps to also offer to upload directly from a URL. On three attempts, after about three minutes into the upload, the deployment process fails. Either on the JCS end or in the browser to server communication is a problem. I am not sure what it is caused by. For now, I will simply try my hand at a smaller WAR.

Plan B or Take Two at deploying a Java EE application

Instead of looking around for a suitable ready to deploy WAR file, it is probably even more rewarding to quickly develop a Java EE application, build it as a WAR file and deploy it to my new JCS instance. Using JDeveloper, I quickly whip up a JAX-WS application: a simple Java Class that with some JAX-WS applications is turned to a SOAP Web Service (by right clicking the Class and selecting the option Create Web Service):

The functionality of this service should be fairly obvious from the code. The WSDL that the derived service exposes can be previewed in JDeveloper:

Deployment of the service can be done from the project navigator: right click on the ViewController project: Read the complete article here.

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Technorati Tags: Lucas Jellema,JCS,Java Cloud Service,PaaS,Cloud,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

Wednesday Apr 27, 2016

Getting started with Java Cloud Service on the Oracle Public Cloud (WebLogic as a Service) by Lucas Jellema

clip_image002The Java Cloud Service (JCS) in the Oracle Public Cloud allows me to deploy Java EE applications such as JAX-RS and JAX-WS REST and SOAP Web Services, Servlet | JSP | JSF Web Applications, EJB and JMS artifacts and ADF applications to the public cloud and make them accessible to developers, testers and end users anywhere in the world. For components to be deployed to the JCS – I have to do nothing special (!) during development or deployment: anything that runs on premises will run in JCS.

In this article, I will describe some of my initial experiences with JCS: what did I have to do to get going the first time – from having nothing more but a (trial) subscription to JCS to deploying and running my first Java EE application on JCS. I thought this would be a very long article with a large number of tips and tricks and with deeply technical steps. I felt some reluctance to even get going – feeling a little daunted by a new world full of new terminology. As it turned out – this is not a long article and it certainly does not contain a lot of tips. My initial reluctance was misplaced. JCS is just WebLogic – hosted on a different machine than my laptop and with a different provisioning interface. The amount of cloud terminology is limited (cloud account, identity domain, service instance is probably the bulk of it – along with simple tooling: dashboard, service console). JCS builds on three other Oracle Public Cloud Services that we need to be aware of: DBaaS (Database), Compute Cloud Service and Storage Cloud Service.

You do not need guidance from me for all the steps you need to go through. I worked with an excellent tutorial on Oracle Help Center – Getting Started with Oracle Java Cloud Service – and I heartily recommend you do the same.

The steps (described in this tutorial) that you need to go through in order to have your first Java EE application running are:

  • (do: 5 minutes | then wait: days up to months) Get a [Trial] Subscription to the Oracle Java Cloud Service – for your Oracle account (the same one you use for OTN and any other interaction with Oracle); an Oracle Java Cloud Service trial environment or purchased subscription comes with Oracle IaaS Public Cloud Services, which provides you access to Storage CS and Compute CS – both of which underpin the JCS instance;
    Note: Database Cloud Service is a prerequisite of Java Cloud Service and is priced separately. When you request provisioning of an instance of JCS, you need to specify the DBaaS instance that it should make use of.  Read my previous article on DBaaS to get going with the Oracle Database as a Service offering and prepare a database instance.
  • (do: 5 minutes) Associate the [trial]subscription with an existing or a new Oracle Public Cloud account (and thereby to an identity domain)
  • (do: 5 minutes) Generate SSH keys (you can reuse the SSH key pair you may already have created to get going with Oracle DBaaS) Read the complete article here.

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Wednesday Jan 27, 2016

WeatherApp with MAF using MCS by Soham Dasgupta

clip_image002Pre-requisites/Assumptions :

  1. MAF version : 2.1.3
  2. mafmcsutility.jar exists in the classpath of the application.
  3. Two REST API build and exposed from Oracle Mobile Cloud Service(MCS).
    • This application is available on GitHub and can be downloaded and run from your own machine.
    • This application uses 2 APIs created and exposed in MCS
      • /mobile/custom/WeatherAPI/getweather?country=<CCC>&city=<AAA>
      • /mobile/custom/WeatherAPI/getCities?country=<CCC>
  4. Part 1 : talks about creating the Mobile Backend on MCS : http://adfjava.blogspot.in/2015/10/weatherapp-with-maf-using-mcs-part-1.html

GitHub application can be found on :

https://github.com/sohamda/WeatherApp/

Following sections, I will talk a bit about

  • maf-application.xml
  • Datacontrol
  • Taskflow
  • Javascript to enable device back button

You can download the Github project and check the whole source code in JDeveloper 12.1.3
maf-application.xml:
I have defined the MCS connection details in this xml. Read the complete article here.

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Friday Dec 25, 2015

PaaS free trial accounts MCS and JCS

clip_image002As part of our communities we do offer free PaaS accounts (only for partners in Europe, Middle East and Africa. In case you are not part of EMEA please contact your local partner manager):

· Java Cloud Service & Mobile Cloud Service PaaS Demo Accounts (WebLogic Community membership required)

· Integration Cloud Service & Process Cloud Service PaaS Demo Accounts  (SOA Community membership required)

Watch the GSE Overview Video! Get an overview of what GSE is and how you can use GSE to help you sell. You can also get long running dedicated PaaS instances, therefore please send us details about your use cases.


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Wednesday Dec 09, 2015

Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (3 – Take Off – ROTATE) by Timo Hahn

clip_image001The last part of the series 3 – Take Off – V1 we finished when we could build hte application using ANT on the local machine. In this part we are going to try this on the Oracle Developer Cloud. Finally we should see how Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery works in the cloud.

NOTE
I created a fresh set of ANT build scripts named ‘buildlocal.xml’ and ‘buildlocal.properties’ from the project to demonstrate the process. The original ones name ‘build.xml’ and ‘build.properties’ are the final result which I didn’t want to revert. So when you create the ANT scripts yourself you can user the default names ‘build.xml’ and ‘build.properties’. When I talk about build files I now mean the ones named ‘buildlocal.*’.

Demo Build Files

For the same reason we create a new build job in the cloud names ADFTestBuild to show the steps to take. The final build job is named ADFCommunuityFrkExt. Read the complete article here.

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Monday Dec 07, 2015

Mobile Cloud Service – External SOAP Service Connector by Andrejus Baranovskis


clip_image002These days everything is about MCS/MAF. I'm also looking into this new area, but I'm trying to mix traditional ADF topics and new things. Who knows may be MCS/MAF is a new big thing and its good time to learn it. I was testing how it works to define my own custom SOAP connector to calculate currency conversion rate.
MCS developer portal allows to create and use new connector. Special wizard helps to complete this task, just click on large CONNECTORS icon:

There is new option available to create new SOAP/REST connector:

Wizard reminds me JDEV interface, steps are similar as to generate SOAP connection in JDEV. You need to provide SOAP WSDL URL, name and description: Read the complete article here.

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Sunday Dec 06, 2015

Mobile Cloud Service: Create an API that calls a external web service by Rubén Rodríguez Santiago

clip_image001In the lasts post about Oracle Mobile Cloud Platform I already told that you can connect to a external SOAP/REST web service, but you have to do it through a connector. We ahev also to keep in mind that with REST API or Android/iOS SDK you cannot call directly a connector, you have to call a custom API that will make the call to that connector so we will also have to make a implementation of out custom API using node.js.
You can download this example from my Github repository.
Check my previous post to see Oracle Mobile Cloud Service overview

In this post I am going to show with a quick example  how easy is to create an API that makes a call to an external REST web service.

The steps we are going to do are:

  1. Create a Mobile Backend (MBE)
  2. Create a Connector
  3. Create, design and implement an API.

Create a Mobile Backend (MBE)
A Mobile Backend is the gateway through we will make any API (custom or platform) call, so the first step is to create one.
In the Developer Portal we have to make click on Mobile Backend and in the next page we have to click on "New Mobile backend" and fill the required fields like name and description. Read the complete article here.

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Thursday Dec 03, 2015

Mobile Cloud Service updated collateral

Monday Nov 16, 2015

What was the "Mandatory Maintenance for Java Cloud Service" last night? by Simon Haslam

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Had I been working in Operations and on-call at an organisation using Java Cloud Service then it appeared I may well have been rudely woken up last night! At around 2am in the UK this email innocently dropped into my mail box:

This warning of an impending outage to Java Cloud Service was closely followed by one for Database Cloud Service. Judging by the email - "during the maintenance your services will be unavailable" - it seems an hour and a half later the instance failure notifications (from Enterprise Manager or Nagios etc) would have probably started coming in.

Then at 4:36am I had an email to say my JCS was now available again, and 5:11am to say my DBCS was too so, a total outage according to the emails of just under 2 hours. However when it happened all of my Java and Database test instances (test) were down already but as far as I can tell no changes were actually made to them (they were not started up for example) - be sure to read my conclusions at the end of this post!

What's New?

So this evening I've been having a good look round. The most obvious first change is that you can provision new domains with WebLogic 12.1.3.0.4, and existing full JCS ones (i.e. the ones including 'cloud tooling' for patching) have the following patches available: Read the complete article here.

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Saturday Nov 14, 2015

Java Cloud Service now available in EMEA datacenters & updated material

clip_image002We are pleased to announce the availability of Oracle Java Cloud Service (JCS) in EMEA datacenters.
This option can now be selected in WebQuote, for new customers.  Please note that this announcement applies to both the metered and non-metered SKUs of Java Cloud Service and Java Cloud Service Virtual Image. Java Cloud Service SaaS Extenstion has been available for provisioning in EMEA for quite a long time now.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Friday Nov 06, 2015

Has your organisation adopted DevOps yet?

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If not, you should probably consider it.

Organisations that are using DevOps are seeing significant improvements in the performance of their IT organisation, in areas such as:

● agility

● time to market

● failure rate

● time to recover from failure

This improved IT performance is reflected in better business performance. Companies with high - performing IT saw 50% higher growth of their market capitalisation over three years compared to those with low or medium performance IT functions.

So what is DevOps? Fundamentally it is a culture. One in which development and operations work together rather than in opposition. This might sound like an obvious thing to do. However development and operations have traditionally been organised in a way that promotes conflict, rather than collaboration.

Traditionally, development is focused on innovation, operations on stability.

Development creates new software, or modifies existing software. For development change means progress.

Operations works to satisfy SLAs - keeping systems available and performing. For operations, change means risk.

Since the two groups basic goals are in opposition, it is no surprise that the relationship between them has typically been characterised by conflict.

DevOps replaces this culture of conflict with one of collaboration. Both teams share the same goal, and are equally accountable.

A useful analogy here is a factory production line. All of the stages of the process have to be completed successfully before a product can be considered “built”. By focussing on the end goal, all of the teams work together.

Like industrial manufacturing, a key enabler for a DevOps approach is automation. In particular the automation includes the provisioning and configuration of runtime environments. The scripts used to achieve this are considered part of the overall build (“infrastructure as code”), and are included in source control.

The use of automation dramatically reduces the time taken to deploy code changes, whether to production or test environments. This means we can deploy “little and often” - going faster, but with less risk.

While DevOps does not require use of cloud as a deployment platform, the ability to rapidly provision and configure environments via automated tooling is a characteristic of a cloud platform. So cloud is a natural choice of platform for DevOps.

The Oracle Cloud platform has been engineered to help Oracle customers adopt or extend the use of DevOps.

At the heart is the Oracle Developer Cloud Service. This provides enabling capabilities to support a DevOps approach:

● Git code repository for source control

● Code review

● IDE integration (OEPE, NetBeans, JDeveloper)

● Issue tracking

● Continuous Integration using Hudson

● Deployment (automatic or on - demand)

● Wiki

In a typical scenario, a developer would make code changes and then push these to Git. Hudson would detect that code had changed and run a build job or jobs to build the application and run unit tests. The application would then be deployed into the target environment.

Operations staff could then monitor the application in the target environment and raise issues or requests for further improvements in the developer cloud service for the development team.

Oracle Developer Cloud Service is included with the following Oracle Cloud services:

● Java Cloud Service

● Java Cloud Service - SaaS Extension

● Messaging Cloud Service

Unfortunately we can’t change your organisation to a DevOps culture for you, but we can enable that change if you choose to embrace DevOps.

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Thursday Nov 05, 2015

New Features : Oracle Mobile Security Suite Integration in Oracle MAF 2.1.3 by Kundan Vyas

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Introduction

MAF 2.1.3 provides a tighter integration with Oracle Mobile Security Suite (OMSS) 11.1.2.3.1.This integration offers capabilities like, Android Containerization, Data Leak Protection, Data Encryption, Application Tunneling, Container Authentication and Single Sign-On. Features like Containerization, Data Leak Protection and Data Encryption are already supported on iOS from previous MAF releases.

New Features

1. Support for Android Containerization

Mobile app containerization allows customers to add a standardized security layer to native mobile apps.

The containerization process is simple, and developers do not need to change a line of code. MAF developers just need to deploy the application to OMSS, in JDeveloper or Eclipse. During the deployment, the app is first compiled and an unsigned version of the app is generated that is intended to be signed with an enterprise distribution certificate for distribution within the company. After deployment, a wrapped APK file is generated which is signed with the signing certificates which are configured in the MAF JDeveloper / Eclipse Preferences, in the Android platform section. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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Wednesday Nov 04, 2015

Create the MAF Client Application to Monitor and Detect Beacons

clip_image002 This tutorial walks you through developing an Oracle Mobile Application Framework (MAF) application that monitors and detects iBeacons on both iOS and Android devices. You will learn how to develop an iOS app that advertises an iBeacon identifier. During the lab you will also learn how to develop AMX pages, incorporate 3rd party Cordova plugins, and make practical use of local notifications with MAF apps.
In the first part you create a beacon client MAF application that uses a Cordova plugin as a bridge between the device’s bluetooth capabilities and the MAF application. Because the Cordova plugin’s API is written in JavaScript, you include JavaScript to communicate between the MAF application and the plugin. You'll also include a local notification so that if the application is in the background or the device is asleep, the user will become aware that the device has entered a beacon region.
In the second part of the tutorial, you create another application that acts as a beacon that will advertise its location. To test the applications from this tutorial, you must deploy each application to a separate device that supports Bluetooth Low Energy. One device will act as the beacon and advertise, while the other device will use an application to monitor and detect the advertisements. The device running the advertising beacon must be an iOS device. The device running the client application may either be an Android or iOS device. Note that the device running the advertising application must be an iOS device. This tutorial deploys and tests applications on iOS devices.

Purpose

Download Files

In order to complete this tutorial you must have JDeveloper 12.1.3 and MAF 2.1.1 installed. Then download a file archive and unzip it into a temporary place on your machine. This archive contains code and the Cordova plugin you will need during the tutorial. The file should be saved and unzipped in a temporary directory located in the same hard drive partition as your JDeveloper/mywork directory. The zip file also contains solution applications.

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Get the tutorial here.

WebLogic Partner Community

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