Saturday Dec 26, 2015

WLS UCP Datasource by Steve Felts

clip_image002WebLogic Server (WLS) 12.2.1 introduces a new datasource type that uses the Oracle Universal Connection Pool (UCP) as an alternative connection pool.  The UCP datasource allows for configuration, deployment, and monitoring of the UCP connection pool as part of the WLS domain.  It is certified with the Oracle Thin driver (simple, XA, and replay drivers).

The product documentation .  The goal of this article  is not to reproduce that information but to summarize the feature and provide some additional information and screen shots for configuring the datasource.
A UCP data source is defined using a jdbc-data-source descriptor as a system resource.  With respect to multi-tenancy, these system resources can be defined at the domain, partition, resource group template, or resource group level. 

The configuration  for a UCP data source is pretty simple with the standard datasource parameters.  You can  name it, give it a URL, user, password and JNDI name.  Most of the detailed configuration and tuning comes in the form of UCP connection properties.  The administrator can configure values for any setters supported by oracle.ucp.jdbc.PoolDataSourceImpl except LogWriter  (see oracle.ucp.PoolDaaSourceImpl) by just removing the "set" from the attribute name (the names are case insensitive).  For example, Read the complete article here.

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For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Sunday Oct 18, 2015

Active GridLink URLs by Steve Felts

Active GridLink (AGL) is the data source type that provides connectivity between WebLogic Server and an Oracle Database service, which may include one or more Oracle RAC clusters or DataGuard sites.  As the supported topologies grow to include additional features like Global Database Services (GDS) and new features are added to the Oracle networking and database support, the complexity of the URL to access this has also gotten more complex. There are lots of examples in the documentation.  This is a short article that summarizes patterns for defining the URL string for use with AGL.

It should be obvious but let me start by saying AGL only works with the Oracle Thin Driver.

AGL data sources only support long format JDBC URLs. The supported long format pattern is basically the following (there are lots of additional properties, some of which are described below).

jdbc:oracle:thin:@(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=[SCAN_VIP])(PORT=[SCAN_PORT])))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=[SERVICE_NAME])))

If not using SCAN, then the ADDRESS_LIST would have one or more ADDRESS attributes with HOST/PORT pairs. It's recommended to use SCAN if possible and it's recommended to use VIP addresses to avoid TCP/IP hangs.

Easy Connect (short) format URLs are not supported for AGL data sources. The following is an example of a Easy Connect URL pattern that is not supported for use with AGL data sources:

jdbc:oracle:thin:[SCAN_VIP]:[SCAN_PORT]/[SERVICE_NAME]

General recommendations for the URL are as follows.

- Use a single DESCRIPTION.  Avoid a DESCRIPTION_LIST to avoid connection delays.

- Use one ADDRESS_LIST per RAC cluster or DataGuard database.

- Put RETRY_COUNT, RETRY_DELAY, CONNECT_TIMEOUT at the DESCRIPTION level so that all ADDRESS_LIST entries use the same value. Read the complete article here.

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For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Saturday Mar 09, 2013

Data Source Connection Pool Sizing by Steve Felts

One of the most time-consuming procedures of a database application is establishing a connection. The connection pooling of the data source can be used to minimize this overhead. That argues for using the data source instead of accessing the database driver directly.

Configuring the size of the pool in the data source is somewhere between an art and science - this article will try to move it closer to science.

From the beginning, WLS data source has had an initial capacity and a maximum capacity configuration values. When the system starts up and when it shrinks, initial capacity is used. The pool can grow to maximum capacity. Customers found that they might want to set the initial capacity to 0 (more on that later) but didn’t want the pool to shrink to 0. In WLS 10.3.6, we added minimum capacity to specify the lower limit to which a pool will shrink. If minimum capacity is not set, it defaults to the initial capacity for upward compatibility. We also did some work on the shrinking in release 10.3.4 to reduce thrashing; the algorithm that used to shrink to the maximum of the currently used connections or the initial capacity (basically the unused connections were all released) was changed to shrink by half of the unused connections.

The simple approach to sizing the pool is to set the initial/minimum capacity to the maximum capacity. Doing this creates all connections at startup, avoiding creating connections on demand and the pool is stable. However, there are a number of reasons not to take this simple approach. Read the full article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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