Monday Feb 09, 2015

OEPE – Deploying Android MAF Applications with OEPE

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Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse provides a number of different options when it comes to deploying your Oracle MAF applications. This video walks you through some of the production deployment settings when deploying to an Android device. Watch the YouTube video here.

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Populate af:table programmatically from managed bean using POJO by Ashish Awasthi

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This post is about a common question
How can we populate an af:table programmatically ?
It means that data in af:table is not populated through model layer (Using ViewObject) using binding layer. lets say I have some values in our managed bean and have to show records in tabular format on page

So what we have to do -

  • First you should know the number and data type of columns in table, suppose i have to populate a table for person details (name, mobile number and salary). to get and set value of columns i have created a java bean class , it has 3 variable for 3 columns

Read complete article here.

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Persisting to MDS Store using Programmatic API’s in ADF

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In last some of the posts regarding MDS, we saw how to achieve Personalizations and Seeded Customizations in Enterprise applications using Oracle ADF. There was explanation how to leverage Oracle ADF MDS framework for this purpose. Most of the personalization and customization is provided OOTB by the framework and just requires correct configurations and steps to achieve. These are declarative user customizations which allow to implicit save component changes done by the user.
But there are scenarios where some custom persistence is required to be saved to MDS Store. This means, that state of the components needs to be changes based on certain conditions. This explicit saving of state of components can be done using Java API provided by the framework.
Lets take an example for this post:
This example uses a ShowDetailFrame which is webcenter component. There is a button show/hide SDF which hides and shows the below SDF. Now this hide and show of SDF is being persisted in MDS Store. For now we will take File system based MDS Store. So for a particular user, when user performs show or hide of SDF, its state is stored in MDS and is presented to the user when it Logins next time into the application.
So when user clicks Hide/UnHide SDF button , action listener has to perform the logic of hide/unhide of SDF. More than this, the action listener needs to save the state of SDF (hide or show) to MDS Store. Now this is where it comes to the topic of this post. At this stage, it need some mechanism in action listener to perform this save of state of SDF to MDS Store.
This is done through API provided by MDS framework in ADF. It uses ChangeManager API from FacesContext to perform this. Below is the page layout that I have described above. Read the complete article here.

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Sunday Feb 08, 2015

MAF 2.0 : Loading Images in a Background Process – Part I by Luc Bors

clip_image002Images are heavily used in Mobile apps. For instance a list that contains employees usually shows the images of these employees. This works well when you have a WIFI connection, but what if you are using slower connections ? If you look at a mobile twitter app you will see that, depending on connectivity, images are loaded instantaneously or delayed. In this post I explain how you can load the images of a List in a background process, after the other content has been loaded.

As mentioned before, a twitter client is able to defer the loading of images whenever a slow connection is detected. You are able to read the content as soon as it is loaded, and the images will show up with a delay, one at a time. Read the complete article here.

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Adaptive Form with Dynamic ADF LOV Value Binding by Andrejus Baranovskis


clip_image002Previously I had a post about dynamic ADF attribute binding creation and dynamic ADF form generation - Adaptive Form with Dynamic ADF Attribute Value Binding. Blog reader was asking how to generate dynamic ADF LOV binding using similar approach. This is possible and actually documented in Eugene Fedorenko post here - Dynamic LOV binding. I will use the same piece of code to extend my sample application with dynamic ADF LOV binding support.
Here you can download updated sample application - DynamicAttributeBindingApp_v2.zip. This application is updated with LOV definition for JobId attribute in ADF BC:

Once you are generating dynamic components on the UI and getting VO attributes to render, you should not be surprised there will be more attribute entries returned than you can see defined in VO. Additional attributes are for View Accessors, and we don't need them while generating dynamic ADF UI. This can be controlled by checking attribute kind property for attribute definition. If attribute kind is not of rowset kind, we can display it: Read the complete article here.

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Friday Feb 06, 2015

Modifying the Oracle Alta Skin by Shay Shmeltzer

clip_image002In the previous blog entries I showed you how to create an ADF project that uses the new Alta UI and then showed you an example of implementing one of the design patterns for a flip card. In this blog/video I'm going to show you how you can further fine tune the look and feel of your Alta application by modifying and extending your skin with CSS.

At the end of the day, this is going to be done in a similar way to how you skinned previous ADF applications. (If you have never done this before, you might want to watch the videos in these two blog entries).

But since the skinning design time is not completely there for Alta in JDeveloper 12.1.3 there are a couple of tricks. Specifically when you create the new skin, you'll need to change the trinidad-skins.xml file to indicate it is extending the alta-v1 and not skyros-v1  - <extends>alta-v1.desktop</extends>

Then the rest of your tasks would be basically the same (although you won't see the overview tab in your skin editor).

Watch the YouTube video here.

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An interview with enterprise mobility lead Luc Bors by Chris Muir


clip_image002Mobility expert Luc Bors from AMIS Netherlands recently published via McGraw-
Hill the Oracle Mobile Application Developer Guide, the very first book to come out about Oracle's Mobile Application Framwork (MAF) since its release earlier this year. Following on from my previous articles on Oracle mobile leaders, in this Q&A article we interviewed Luc to share his insights into the world of Oracle mobility with you.

Firstly Luc, congratulations on publishing your book on Oracle's Mobile Application Framework. This must have been a big achievement for you?

Luc: Thanks Chris. This was definitely a big achievement for me. It was hard work and it took a lot of my spare time. I will never forget the moment when I submitted my final chapter and, some 3 months later, the moment the shipment with my book in print arrived. It felt great! I was finally able to hold the book in my hands.

Great work. If we can take a few steps back, I've had the pleasure of knowing you for a few years when you've presented at conferences around the world, but for the audience can you please introduce yourself, your role and organization you work for?

Luc: My name is Luc Bors. I am an Oracle ACE and I work as a principal consultant for AMIS Services in the Netherlands. AMIS is a consulting company where expertise is key. This is evident in our profound knowledge of the complete Oracle technology stack. With nearly 100 employees we not only work for customers in the Netherlands, but also offer expert services throughout the world.

What’s your background before working on mobile solutions?

Luc: Actually I do not have a background in IT at all. I have a master’s degree in Genetic Engineering from Wageningen University. During my years in university I already developed an affinity to computer science as I was using and altering highly sophisticated software for statistical analysis. After graduating it did not take much time and effort to switch from Bio Technology to Information Technology. Both were emerging technologies in the 90’s and that is where my passion lies: new technologies. I started as an Oracle Forms and PL/SQL Developer in 1997 and about 8 years ago I switched to Java and Oracle ADF. I have been involved in many ADF projects, both greenfield ADF implementations and Forms to ADF modernization projects. First as developer, later as technical team lead and architect.

And today what’s your main focus?

Luc: Today my main focus is ADF architecture and mobile solutions based on the Oracle Mobile Application Framework. I tend to combine both and use the power of both frameworks in the context of enterprise mobility.

As a developer, what’s changed since you took up the “mobile first” mantra?

Luc: The first time I took up a mobile challenge was actually quite some years ago. In a proof of concept for a retailer I created a solution for handheld scanners that called out to a web service to find the stock for articles with a given barcode. Back in those days nobody had heard of “mobile first”. Read the complete interview here.

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Thursday Feb 05, 2015

Whats new in GlassFish 4.1? by C2B2


clip_image001GlassFish 4.1 was released a couple of months ago now, bringing with it a large number of welcome bug fixes and improvements. As the Payara Open Source project was born from it, it would be remiss of us not give all of you who maintain an interest in GlassFish a brief overview of some of the things that have changed or been updated since 4.0. Among these changes, the minimum JDK version required is now 7 Update 65, or 8 Update 20, so you'll need to update if you intend to use it with anything less; it likely just won't start otherwise!

Updated Platforms and Specifications

As you might expect from any major update to an application server (even if it is just a minor point release), and particularly since GlassFish still holds itself as the Java EE reference application server, there is now support for more recent platforms and Java EE specifications.

Java SE 8

Arguably the headline new feature, GlassFish 4.1 now supports Java SE 8, bringing it up to date with the latest Java specifications. This brings with it all of the new features available in Java 8, such as Lambda expressions, a brand new Date and Time API, and concurrent accumulator classes. There’s quite a stir around the introduction of Lambda expressions, and how it adds some functional programming “oomph” to the Java language.

PermGen No More? Read the complete article here

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Wednesday Feb 04, 2015

Building a Smart Home Server by Using the Java EE 7 WebSocket API

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This tutorial shows you how to create an application that uses the WebSocket API for real-time communication between a client and a server. You learn how to:

  • Create a Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 (Java EE 7) application that uses the WebSocket API
  • Use the OnOpen and OnMessage WebSocket lifecycle events to perform different actions on the Java EE 7 application.
  • Define a client-side WebSocket endpoint by using JavaScript
  • Operate on Plain Old Java Objects (POJOs), in real-time, with actions invoked from a web browser client

Get the free tutorial here.

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Monday Feb 02, 2015

New Releases: Oracle Java ME 8.1 and Java ME SDK 8.1 by Terrence Barr

clip_image001At JavaOne a few weeks ago, Oracle made available the Java ME 8.1 Developer Preview release for the Freescale FRDM-K64F (“Java ME 8.1 in 190 KB RAM”) and announced the upcoming full release of Java ME Embedded 8.1 (press release).

On Monday this week, we followed up as promised and posted the General Availability (GA) releases of Oracle Java ME 8.1 and the Oracle ME SDK 8.1.

Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 and ME SDK 8.1 New Features and Enhancements

  • Support for ARM Cortex-M3/-M4 micro-controllers
  • Updated Raspberry Pi support
  • Updated Developer Preview on FRDM-K64 with mbed
  • Improved support for two additional Qualcomm Gobi device families
  • New communication, security, and networking features
  • New support for Eclipse IDE, including major update of the Eclipse MTJ plugin
  • Developer improvements: Tooling over USB, heap analysis, faster communication
  • A number of smaller enhancements and fixes

Java 8: Truly Scalable

With this release, Java ME 8 now fully lives up to its design promise of delivering a feature-rich Java 8 platform that scales from powerful embedded systems all the way down to resource-constrained singe-chip micro-controllers with as little as 128 KB of RAM. Read the complete article here.

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Getting to know Docker – a better way to do virtualization by Mark Nelson

clip_image002In this post, with guest co-writers Edwin Biemond (@biemond) and Joel Nation (@joelith), we will explore virtualization with Docker.  You may have heard of Docker, it is getting a lot of interest lately, especially with the recent announcement that Google are using it in their cloud service.  What Docker does is that it allows you to create reusable ‘containers’ with applications in them.  These can be distributed, will run on several platforms, and are much smaller than the ‘equivalent’ virtual machine images.  The virtualization approach used by Docker is also a lot more lightweight than the approach used by hypervisors like VMWare and VirtualBox.

The motivation for looking at Docker is twofold.  Firstly, there are a lot of virtual machines images created for training purposes, e.g. for SOA Suite.  These are then distributed to Oracle folks and partners around the world.  They tend to be in the 20-40 GB range in terms of size.  This means that downloading them takes time, unzipping them takes time, and you need to have plenty of space to store them and so on.  Publishing updates to these images is hard, and in reality means you need to go download them again.  It would be nice to have a better way to distribute pre-built environments like this – a method that allowed for much smaller downloads, and the ability to publish updates easily, without sacrificing the control over the configuration of the environment – so that you still know what you are going to end up with when you start up the ‘image’.

Secondly, as many of you know, I have a strong interest in Continuous Delivery and automation of the build-test-release lifecycle.  Being able to quickly create environments that are in a known state, to use for testing automation, is a key capability we would want when building a delivery pipeline.

Docker provides some capabilities that could really help in both of these areas.  In this post, we are just going to focus on the first one, and while we are exploring, let’s also look at how well Docker integrates with other tools we care about – like Vagrant, Chef and Puppet for example.

Introducing Docker

Docker is a virtualization technology that uses containers.  A container is a feature that was added to the Linux kernel recently.  Solaris has had containers (or ‘zones’) for a long time.  A container is basically a virtual environment (like a VM) where you can run applications in isolation – protected from other applications in other containers or on the ‘host’ system.  Unlike a VM, it does not emulate a processor and run its own copy of the operating system, with its own memory, and virtual devices.  Instead, it shares the host operating system, but has its own file system, and uses a layering technology to overlay sparse file systems on top of each other to create its file system – you’ll see what this means in practice later on.  When you are ‘in’ the container, it looks like you are on a real machine, just like when you are ‘in’ a VM.  The difference is that the container approach uses a lot less system resources than the VM approach, since it is not running another copy of the operating system.

This means that more of your physical memory is available to run the actual application you care about, and less of it is consumed by the virtualization software and the virtualized operating system.  When you are running VMs – this impact can be significant, especially if you need to run two or three VMs.

Containers are pretty mainstream – as we said, Solaris has had them for years, and people have been using them to isolate production workloads for a long time.

You can use Linux containers without using Docker.  Docker just makes the whole experience a lot more pleasant.  Docker allows you to create a container from an ‘image’, and to save the changes that you make, or to throw them away when you are done with the container.

These images are versioned, and they are layered on top of other images.  So they are reusable.  For example, if you had five demo/training environments you wanted to use, but they all have SOA Suite, WebLogic, JDK, etc., in them – you can put SOA Suite into one image, and then create five more images for each of the five demo/training environments – each of these as a layer on top of the SOA image.  Now if you had one of those five ‘installed’ on your machine and you wanted to fire up one of the others, Docker allows you to just pull down that relatively small demo image and run it right on top of the relatively large SOA image you already have. Read the complete article here.

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Sunday Feb 01, 2015

Create a NFS instance on AWS by the Sysco team

clip_image002I was creating AWS EC2 instances to install Oracle Fusion Middleware products, and I found an issue: How to download Oracle's installers if I want to use installers on several instances? This could consume a lot of network bandwith and I want to make this process repeatable, so I don't want to wait 1 hour each installation only downloading files.

So, I found this solution: How to setup an Amazon AWS EC2 NFS Share. But to make it more reusable, I create a Vagrant & Chef configuration to replicate and share this method here: Git repository

What are the steps?

  1. You need to install Vagrant (vagrant-aws and vagrant-omnibus) and Chef SDK
  2. You have to create Chef Server account and upload the cookbooks
  3. You need to create AWS account to create instances remotly.
  4. You have to create a Vagrant configuration and customize it to create an AWS EC2 instance
  5. Test it.

Well, I've created a configuration on GitHub and I'll show you how to use it: Watch the Youtube video here.

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MAF 2.0 : Loading Images in a Background Process – Part I by Luc Bors

clip_image002Images are heavily used in Mobile apps. For instance a list that contains employees usually shows the images of these employees. This works well when you have a WIFI connection, but what if you are using slower connections ? If you look at a mobile twitter app you will see that, depending on connectivity, images are loaded instantaneously or delayed. In this post I explain how you can load the images of a List in a background process, after the other content has been loaded.

As mentioned before, a twitter client is able to defer the loading of images whenever a slow connection is detected. You are able to read the content as soon as it is loaded, and the images will show up with a delay, one at a time. Read the complete article here.

WebLogic Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Saturday Jan 31, 2015

Java EE Applications on Oracle Java Cloud by Harshad Oak

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Oracle's Java Cloud Service, view how-to's and get more details about

APIs and specs

 The Java Community Process

 IDE Integration

 Your First JCS project, building with NetBeans

 Webapp structures

 Servlets, Filters and Listeners

 Sharing Data

 JSPs, JSTL and Expression Language

 JSF and Struts

 EJBs (Session Beans)

 Web Services

 much more!

Read the complete article here.

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