Monday Mar 10, 2014

After months of rumors, it's official… Oracle announces Cloud Student

Greetings from Alliance 2014 in sunny Las Vegas, where today we made a number of announcements about increased investment by Oracle in the higher education market.   During the opening reception last night and in more detail this morning, we outlined our plans to build (from the ground up) a new Student Information System (Oracle Cloud Student) that will be offered as SaaS and designed with the modern student in mind.  Make no mistake, this product will have the student, and the student's success, at the foundation of the development effort upon which we are embarking.  

There will be a strong focus on mobile, social, and the student experience, with a significant amount of attention given to the "modern" (now what some might even call "traditional") multi-channel student who takes courses across multiple institutions, some (to potentially all) on-line, and in some cases "on-demand" (i.e. term-less).  It will embed predictive analytics,  which will significantly enhance the modern academy's effort to improve student success.

Probably the biggest overlooked element in all of this is the enormous head start we have as a company given the massive investments in SaaS, Cloud infrastructure, CX, and analytics.  No other company on the planet can draw on the rich portfolio of IP, development talent, deployment and implementation experience, and industry expertise than Oracle.   While I've said in this blog in the past that it's a very exciting time to be a part of the higher education IT ecosystem at this point in the industry's evolution, our focus on developing a modern SIS for higher ed of 2015 and beyond makes this period even more compelling.

Our CEO was personally involved in approving these projects, and we aren't stopping with just a new Cloud SIS.  We're building higher education-specific functionality into our existing robust SaaS HCM and ERP products, so that colleges and universities have the option of running their entire business systems footprint on Oracle's Education Cloud.

And given the breadth and depth (both from an IP as well as from a financial stability perspective) we are continuing to develop, enhance, and improve the already most mature, functional, and global suite of business systems for higher education: Peoplesoft Campus Solutions, HCM, and ERP.   While many have assumed these were zombie products, the delivered features and enhancements in Campus alone over the past 8 quarters are greater than all of the R&D done on the product in the prior 5 years.  To help the market understand this commitment to our existing portfolio, we will be launching Campus Solutions 9.2 concurrent with the Cloud announcements I mentioned above.

I can't end this post without a final comment on "cloud.  The hype around cloud computing is palpable.  Many of the new entrants into the market like to paint Oracle into a corner as "legacy" and "non-cloud."  But with this announcement, as well as with the capabilities we have today with our complete end-to-end stack and investment in all Cloud "layers" (IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS), there is no software consumption modality that we cannot provide at extreme performance and extreme efficiency and cost-effectiveness (again, because of the end-to-end capabilities we have in designing how the software and hardware are integrated to work together).  We've learned a lot from many other industries' foray into Cloud and believe now is the time for us to help higher education as it embarks on a similar journey.

Thursday Oct 17, 2013

College Ratings via the Federal Government

A few weeks back you might remember news about a higher education rating system proposal from the Obama administration. As I've discussed previously, political and stakeholder pressures to improve outcomes and increase transparency are stronger than ever before. The executive branch proposal is intended to make progress in this area. Quoting from the proposal itself, "The ratings will be based upon such measures as: Access, such as percentage of students receiving Pell grants; Affordability, such as average tuition, scholarships, and loan debt; and Outcomes, such as graduation and transfer rates, graduate earnings, and advanced degrees of college graduates.”

This is going to be quite complex, to say the least. Most notably, higher ed is not monolithic. From community and other 2-year colleges, to small private 4-year, to professional schools, to large public research institutions…the many walks of higher ed life are, well, many. Designing a ratings system that doesn't wind up with lots of unintended consequences and collateral damage will be difficult. At best you would end up potentially tarnishing the reputation of certain institutions that were actually performing well against the metrics and outcome measures that make sense in their "context" of education. At worst you could spend a lot of time and resources designing a system that would lose credibility with its "customers".

A lot of institutions I work with already have in place systems like the one described above. They are tracking completion rates, completion timeframes, transfers to other institutions, job placement, and salary information. As I talk to these institutions there are several constants worth noting:

• Deciding on which metrics to measure is complicated. While employment and salary data are relatively easy to track, qualitative measures are more difficult. How do you quantify the benefit to someone who studies in one field that may not compensate him or her as well as another field but that provides huge personal fulfillment and reward is a difficult measure to quantify?

• The data is available but the systems to transform the data into actual information that can be used in meaningful ways are not. Too often in higher ed information is siloed. As such, much of the data that need to be a part of a comprehensive system sit in multiple organizations, oftentimes outside the reach of core IT.

• Politics and culture are big barriers. One of the areas that my team and I spend a lot of time talking about with higher ed institutions all over the world is the imperative to optimize for student success. This, like the tracking of the students’ achievement after graduation, requires a level or organizational capacity that does not currently exist. The primary barrier is the culture of "data islands" in higher ed, and the need for leadership to drive out the divisions between departments, schools, colleges, etc. and institute academy-wide analytics and data stewardship initiatives that will enable student success.

• Data quality is a very big issue. So many disparate systems exist (some on premise, some "in the cloud") that keep data about "persons" using different means to identify them. Establishing a single source of truth about an individual and his or her data is difficult without some type of data quality policy and tools. Good tools actually exist but are seldom leveraged.

Don't misunderstand - I think it's a great idea to drive additional transparency and accountability into the system of higher education. And not just at home, but globally. Students and parents need access to key data to make informed, responsible choices. The tools exist to not only enable this kind of information to be shared but to capture the very metrics stakeholders care most about and in a way that makes sense in the context of a given institution's "place" in the overall higher ed panoply.

Thursday Aug 15, 2013

Shamless Plug for Oracle OpenWorld

It's almost that time of year again - Oracle OpenWorld 2013 is just over a month away in San Francisco Sept. 22-27.  OpenWorld has always seen relative solid attendance from Education & Research customers; usually between 1000-1500 individuals that attend OOW and JavaOne are from the education industry.  But from an executive and leadership standpoint, the conference hasn't been a significant draw.

In 2013 we're hoping to change that.  Not only do we have 5 general OpenWorld sessions planned (see below), but this year we're launching our first ever Education summit at Leader's Circle, an invitation-only event for customer and partner executives, showcasing Oracle's vision and strategy.  During our 3.5 hour summit on Sept. 25, the main attraction will be a panel focusing on advanced analytics as a foundation for enterprise-wide student success initiatives.   Joining me will be Mark Becker, President of Georgia State University, John Webster, CIO of Maricopa Community Colleges, Nicole Engelbert of OVUM, Abdullah Togay, from the National Ministry of Education, Turkey, Gordon Wishon, CIO, Arizona State University, and Steve Hahn, President of the Higher Education Users Group.

Advanced Analytics and Student Success have been described as the "killer app" in education today, and we hope through this session at OOW to share some experiences and best practices across a wide swath of the education landscape on how these applications are being implemented, what steps are being taken to enable them enterprise-wide, and how a cultural change in the institution is necessary in order to move these projects from departmental and siloed to enterprise and scale.

If you are an executive in any walk of life in the education arena and are interested in joining us for the session in September, please reach out to me at cole.clark@oracle.com.

And as mentioned, here's an overview of our 5 sessions at OpenWorld this year:

CON9612 Monday 9/23, Intercontinental Hotel, Time:10:45am Achieve Student Success with Unified Processes and Insight
CON9613 Monday 9/23, Intercontinental Hotel, Time: 12:45pm Oracle Learning Exchange
CON9614 Monday 9/23, Intercontinental Hotel, Time: 1:45pm Improve Operational Efficiency to Achieve Institutional Excellence
CON10726 Monday 9/23, Intercontinental Hotel, Time: 3:15pm Campus Solutions: Supporting the Global Future of Higher Education
CON8715 Moscone West , 3rd Floor Transforming the Constituent Experience in the Education Industry

-Cole

 

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Comments, news, updates and perspectives from Oracle's global vice president of the education and research industry--which includes higher education, research, and primary/secondary education (K-12) organizations worldwide.

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