Friday Jul 05, 2013

The Summer ISC and the Futures Forum

The summer meeting of our semi-annual industry strategy council (ISC) took place in Washington DC at the end of June.  We enjoyed the highest percentage of member participation since I've been leading this group, and the range of topics we covered included our student success solution, our work in the area of student experience (which includes many of our social relationship management tools), an update on our investments in our student information analytics and student information system products, and a update on our budgeting and planning tools for higher ed.  All of that was covered in the first day, with the second day reserved primarily for discussions with policy officials from Congress and from the current administration (DoE) regarding policies and initiatives in higher education where information technology can play an enabling or supporting role.  

During this second day we heard from Richard Culetta (Director of Education Technology) at DoE, Chairwoman Virginia Foxx of the House Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training, Congressman Luke Messer of Indiana, also on the Higher Education Subcommittee, and Matt Chingos, fellow, at the Brookings Institute. 

We were hoping to have Senatos Rubio and Wyden, authors of the "Student Right to Know Before You Go" bill which they introduced through the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, but the immigration reform bill which came to a vote on the very day we were meeting took up their schedule.  However, we had Emily Bouch (Senator Rubio's Legislative Aide on Education Policy) and Laura Bernsten (Senator Wyden's Domestic Policy Advisory) who crafted the bill visit with the ISC and engaged in a spirited debate on it's merits.

We also filmed a number of short interviews with several of the council members which, once through post-production, we'll post to our website and also place links here.

Several key themes emerged from the two days of meetings with the council.  One is that we have much work to do at Oracle making sense of the myriad of products, especially those recently acquired, in terms of their value and how they enable solutions to the thorniest problems faced by higher education.  Another is that the role of IT in higher education is slowly changing.  IT leadership is becoming more strategic although the tactical and transactional demands haven't waned.  Many of the members expressed their view that Oracle's engagement with higher ed over the past two years has really changed (for the positive), both in terms of product strategy but also in terms of field engagement.  We have a few members on the council that are not from IT (CFO's, Presidents, COO's) and these representatives consistently communicate how IT is by far the most important (aside from funding and personnel) strategic asset the institution has to maintain and improve competitiveness.

The Forum on the Future of Higher Education

The strategic nature of IT in education was reinforced for me at the forum referenced above.  I missed this conference in 2012, but after seeing the output from the meeting I pledged to myself that I wouldn't miss it in 2013.  There was not an IT leader in the 100+ person group (aside from me), but big data and analytics themes ran through virtually all of the discussions, as well as the need to leverage technology to strengthen our major research university's competitiveness in the global research arena.  The changing business model was also at the forefront of the conference, and the need to use tools and "world class" best practices from industry's use of IT to not only run the "business" but also model the business in a future state that may be significantly different from today's reality was clear.

As an added bonus, I met many of our ISC's members bosses at the Future's Forum!

Our next meeting is already being planned for December.  We plan to devote a much larger chunk of the agenda to the research enterprise, to budgeting and planning in higher education, and to security and access management.  Watch this spot later for more details.

Friday Mar 09, 2012

Why Higher Education Needs Oracle More Than Ever

For those of you that I haven't met, I'm Cole Clark. I lead the education and research industry team for Oracle globally. I started my career after graduating from Rhodes College in 1988, working in the nascent IT organization at another university (the University of Tennessee, Memphis) to help put myself through school. I "grew up" in computing during the advent of the Macintosh, client server, the slow demise of the mainframe and the move away from centralized computing with more and more power and capability (and operating system empowerment of users) at the desk, and eventually, lap.

I eventually joined the company whose products I admired so much (Apple), then moved to Sun when in 1997 it appeared Apple would not make it (clearly got that one wrong), then to Oracle by way of its acquisition of Sun in 2010. During those almost 23 years I've watched the almost full-circle from centralized to decentralized back to centralized and now to even more centralization (shared services and cloud) in computing in higher education.

But with this movement back to centrally managed services has come an enormous cost, both in real dollars (or name your currency of choice) and in what we deliver to constituents. Sure, there's the promise of greater efficiency and data security, but with so many more players in the traditional "stack" of enterprise computing, each focusing on a specific layer (or two or three), higher education has generally amassed a collection of technologies that merely move the spaghetti that existed before in the client-server environment to the data center. Think about it - in many cases there are different (sometimes multiple!) suppliers at each layer - storage, storage management, operating system(s), virtualization system, server(s) interconnects, network, database, security and identity management, content management, portal, and various applications. And at each layer, a management interface that rarely integrates (seamlessly and elegantly) with the other layers. So we add people and process.

Virtualization has brought with it greater server utilization and efficiency, but in the place of a handful of, at times, under-utilized servers, we now have massive VM sprawl that brings with it its own set of management costs.

All of the above runs head-long into the economic crisis in education that hit in 2008 and persists today. Cloud computing and community source hold the allure of even greater efficiency and cost savings. But is this really the holy grail? As (outgoing) CSU Northridge president Jolene Koester says in her outstanding piece on university IT when confronted with the comparison of technology to a utility, "...the role of information technology in my university is far more strategic, far more ubiquitous, far more integrated into multiple business practices, and far more integral to the core university functions of teaching and learning. I no longer regard as valid the comparison of information technology to a utility." No, the answer is in my view to leave computing to organizations that are highly skilled, have thousands of use cases upon which to solve problems, and have the intellectual property under the roof to engineer these highly complex systems to work together, with a common management interface.

I recently convened the first meeting of an expanded industry strategy council for education and research at Oracle headquarters in California. I invited many institutions that were outside of our typical participants in the past: some that owned no Oracle applications and utilized solutions from competitors, some that owned little Oracle at all, some that were former Sun customers, some that are still devoted Sun customers today. What resonated with me after a day and a half of interaction and dialog was that there is a lot going on at Oracle unbeknownst to higher ed - investments in relationships and technology, but foremost, moving IT away from integrated solutions to engineered and optimized.

That's our mission in higher ed - to build highly optimized and engineered systems with less complexity and cost, leveraging those engineering assets to bleed out implementation and maintenance costs before they arrive at a college or university data center, or in the data center of some shared services hosting center.

Oracle's biggest obstacle in this quest in higher ed is, from my somewhat naive view of the world, it’s perception by some in the education community as a ‘big bad vendor’. Candidly, it's Oracle’s own fault (again from my personal perspective) that Oracle has created this persona which has contributed to the rise of community source endeavors like Kuali and Sakai. With all due respect to these groups and their cheerleaders, I don't believe they will get higher education where it needs to go. Again, community source solutions have come about partially because vendors are not satisfying the market with the correct products and partially (maybe more than partially) because Oracle is sometimes viewed as Machiavellian. Point taken. But I would encourage any of you taking the time to read this to get to know this new systems company called Oracle. No, all answers to all education computing problems are not yet in, but the key to running efficient and effective computing that provides competitive advantage and allows for keen insight from masses of data into the trends and potentially catastrophes (before they occur), lie in working with us to deploy engineered and optimized systems from us and from our partners.

Oracle has acquired Sun, and PeopleSoft, Hyperion, Siebel, Right Now and.... (the list is more than 75 companies long). We're all about the "systems-ness" of computing now. Yes, Oracle and other vendors have our faults - we're working on those and want to talk more about how we dramatically improve our relationships (hence my desire to further expand the strategy council to even more members, globally). Give us a call. In the words of one of my favorite architects on my global team, "I am listening."

Cole Clark

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Comments, news, updates and perspectives from Oracle's global vice president of the education and research industry--which includes higher education, research, and primary/secondary education (K-12) organizations worldwide.

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