Tuesday Jul 07, 2009

New JDK 7 Feature: Support for Dynamically Typed Languages in the Java Virtual Machine

Over the years, the Java virtual machine (JVM) has been host to a growing number of languages. Increasingly, JVM implementations of dynamic languages are becoming available, such as JRuby, an implementation of the Ruby programming language, Jython, an implementation of the Python programming language, and the Groovy scripting language.

However, developers of these dynamic languages have faced a troublesome obstacle. When developers write engines for dynamically typed languages that run in the JVM, they have to satisfy the requirements of the Java bytecode that the JVM executes. Until now, that bytecode has been designed exclusively for statically typed languages. This design has been especially painful for developers when generating bytecodes for method invocations.

But help is on the way. JSR 292: Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform, which is being implemented in JDK 7, introduces a new Java bytecode instruction for the JVM, invokedynamic, and a new method linkage mechanism based on method handles.

Learn more about this new JDK 7 feature in the article Support for Dynamically Typed Languages in the Java Virtual Machine.

Wednesday Apr 29, 2009

JavaFX App-O-Rama

Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some really cool applications with it. A new article, titled JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community, highlights three community based projects that are producing cool, innovative JavaFX applications.

Here are some other good places to find cool JavaFX applications, sample programs, and demonstrations:

Wednesday Nov 05, 2008

GlassFish and MySQL: The Series

With more than 100 million downloads, MySQL is the world's most popular open-source database. MySQL's popularity is indicative of the growing adoption of open-source software. Developers are using open-source software because it offers them a reliable and low-cost alternative for developing their applications. This adoption trend extends to middleware too. For example, open-source servers are replacing proprietary servers in many enterprises. Case in point: GlassFish, an open-source, enterprise-quality, Java EE 5-compliant application server, enjoys significant popularity. With more than seven million downloads since its release in May 2005 and more than half a million downloads a month, GlassFish has a widespread and growing community of users.

Read the article GlassFish and MySQL, Part 1: A Perfect Combination for Web Applications and learn about the advantages of using MySQL with GlassFish and why the combination is a perfect choice for developing and deploying web applications.

This article is the first in a series of articles about the use MySQL with GlassFish. The second article in the series, GlassFish and MySQL, Part 2: Building a CRUD Web Application With Data Persistence, shows you how to use the NetBeans IDE with GlassFish and MySQL to build a create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) web application that accesses persistent data.

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