PG&E and Sun rebate program gets mixed reaction

I came across this article from SearchDataCenter.com titled "PG&E and Sun rebate program gets mixed reaction".

Sun announced this program earlier this month, Sun Teams with PG&E On First Ever Rebate For Servers, Up To $1000 In Savings

It's interesting where the "mix reaction" comes from:
Hewlett-Packard Co., (HP) for one, isn't impressed. Olivier Helleboid, vice president of adaptive infrastructure, said HP is more focused on cutting the cost of an entire system, adding that the greatest reductions would come from looking at overall operations.
Lin Nease, chief technology officer of HP business critical systems, called it a publicity stunt.
Could it be that HP does NOT have an offering that comes close to what Sun offers in the Sun Fire T1000 and T2000? Show me your SWaP!!
Mark Feverston, Unisys director of enterprise servers and storage, argued that offering the rebate on the Niagara servers wouldn't have a large market impact because he felt that demand for Unix-based servers was declining. He added that he thought the growth of virtualization, not single servers themselves, would drive up power efficiency and push down the total cost of ownership.
Well I guess Mark didn't see our results from last quarter and I guess he doesn't read Jonathan's blog where he mentions, "Our newest Niagara UltraSPARC systems surpassed the $100M per quarter mark, just about the fastest ramp of any product I can remember."

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Comments:

The virtualization comment is sort of odd for a few reasons. It seems to me that virtualization MAY help some companies temporarily stem the tide if they have a lot of unused CPU cycles. Unfortunately, if they are linearly (easiest to envision) increasing their CPU consumption then eventually the "spare" cycles would be used up and they would be purchasing more CPU again at the same rate...or possibly at a slightly lower growth rate if you take into account typical underutilization of CPU cycles. Also, TCO won't necessarily go down with virtualization...after all...you have to buy that virtualization engine, service it, maintain it, etc... And finally, virtualization may be a rebirth of Unix, especially Solaris. Unix-based systems fit very well into virtualization techniques. In the end, some users will benefit from one thing, others will benefit from another thing. Lots of customers are suffering from power consumption right now, Sun is there...where are these other companies?????? They'll be touting their energy efficient servers in a few more years..."me too...me too".

Posted by Paul Monday on August 29, 2006 at 04:52 AM PDT #

It's insteresting that all the major Linux players want to brag about virtualization as being the savior of the computing world. But all of there solutions revolve about just adding an entire OS on top of an existing OS. If you wish to have 10 virtual hosts running on top of the existing OS you end up doing 10 installs. There is no reduction in administrative responsibility perhaps they even grow when people expect each of there apps to run in its own little virtual world. With Solaris you install once and use clone as documented in my blog entry http://uadmin.blogspot.com/2006/08/day-in-life-of-solaris-11-admin.html

So with sun hardware/software not only do you save in power requirements you save in administrative costs as well and that where the real savings are found.

Posted by James Dickens on August 29, 2006 at 07:02 AM PDT #

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