Blowing the cobwebs off my blog -- Rich Client, Solaris Developer, LinuxWorld

I realize it been almost a month since my last blog entry, so I really need to channel a few calories into the ol' blog and resuscitate this beast. It's not that I haven't been thinking this last month; I've been thinking a lot. I just haven't been thinking about channeling my thoughts into a public forum. It's not even that I've been thinking of anything that is all that confidential; just too many rough edges on the thoughts to make interesting.

Part of what I've been working on this last month is developing proposed training plans for some of our developer products. Training classes for creating Rich Client applications with NetBeans IDE. We have some Rich Client information in the NetBeans IDE Field Guide, and we would like to do more to highlight the value of using NetBeans IDE, NetBeans Platform, and the Desktop Java APIs.

I am also working on proposed training plans for Solaris Developers, people who develop applications for Solaris or who will be modifying OpenSolaris. Here we are looking at a set of classes that would help Windows and Linux developers to port their applications to Solaris, or to give developers new to Solaris enough information to get started with modifying and extending OpenSolaris. Writing portable code; optimizing application performance on Solaris; compile, edit, debug, analyze program performance with Sun Studio 10 (marketing info, developer documentation), writing device drivers, and working in a mixed native C, C++, Fortran and Java code environment. Lot of interesting points to ponder.

Earlier this month, I did Sun Studio booth duty at LinuxWorld, and this was a really exciting event for us. We have alpha versions of the C and Fortran compilers for Linux. The C++ engineering team is also working on the Linux version of the C++ compiler. Nice to get the preview versions of the compilers out in time for LinuxWorld. There was also a lot of good interaction between the people at the Sun Studio, OpenSolaris, and the Ultra 20 booths. What is really exciting (I am trying to avoid saying way cool) about the Ultra 20 is that it comes with fully licensed versions of the developer tools.

We are starting to talk about Supercomputing 2005 in Seattle, Nov. 12 to 18, and it's always nice to talk about HPTC (marketing page, documentation links).

Part of being a manager is recognizing the value of the people in your org and the value of their contributions. We are really looking at how developer documentation can help you to efficiently use the product. For Java Studio Creator, we have a tutorials team that has been doing a tremendous job of writing Java Studio Creator tutorials and an online help team where we now have the online help on developers.sun.com (this is a web-based version of the online help provided with the Java Studio Creator product). Most of the tutorials were previously available as locked content where you needed to pay for a SDN subscription, but a lot of the tutorials are now provided for free, and we are working on getting the online help unlocked.

I will continue to highlight the doc and information contributions people are making for other products in future blogs. For now, I've run out of thoughts, and I need to save something to write about for tomorrow's entry. The siren song of Peet's coffee calls. I have also found that adding several scoops of Double Rainbow French Vanilla to my espresso is a very cost-effective, efficient, and labor-saving way of getting the satisfaction of some of the higher-priced coffee beverage products, and I don't even have to sully the blender.

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