Read Me First

I thought I would begin to share my reading list. Let me start by relaying my reading taxonomy. In general I have three categories for my reading materials.

The first is current events. This is essentially news which I get it from multiple channels. I use a RSS reader to capture, search and sort articles from a plethora of news agencies. I do the same with a number of blogs. This way each day I can quickly see what is new from the last time I reviewed. Don't you love RSS? In addition to the digital world, I usually carry with me a number of trade rags and magazines. Current subscriptions include Business Week, ComputerWorld, MIT's Technology Review, The Economist and Business 2.0.

The second category of reading would best be described as personal development, some of you may know this a "self help" No, I don't spend my time at the book store perusing the self help isles for "chicken soup for something", "101 excuses", and "Dr. Phil's diet extravaganza - do what I say, not what I do". Rather this category tends to be focused on management best practices, business tactics and strategy development. Most of the reading I do in this category comes on old fashioned paper. The regular rag I read is Harvard Business Review, but that is usually supplemented by a number of books that cover todays chic business topics.

The third category is of course personal enjoyment. This is a broad category for me as it has included books from easy to read thriller novels to geek oriented physics topics.

Having described my reading taxonomy, let me share a few of the recent books I have read.

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
A fun book. If you think economics is dull, this is the book for you. Interesting perspective and analysis of all kinds of subjects from crime and drugs to parenting and education. If you like numbers and analysis (attention Sigma folks) and have a free afternoon, give it a read.

10 Rules for Strategic Innovators - From Idea to Execution by Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble
This book should have been titled "3 Suggestions" instead of 10 Rules. It reads not all that unlike most business strategy books. The three suggestions (rules) are forgetting, borrowing and learning. Yup that is it. The basic idea is that strategic innovators should forget their current business, leave behind the baggage. Borrow useful things from the existing business that can align and be leveraged by the new business, that is if you have not heeded the previous rule and remember the old company. Then learn from the new business. Like most business books, it does provide a good reminder of basic concepts that we all to often forget. Having said that, leave this one on the shelf.

The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century by Thomas L. Friedman and Oliver Wyman
Easy read and an interesting perspective on the global market based world in which we live, TODAY. How technology and other factors have placed everyone at the same global level (advantage and disadvantage). We are all connected and thus form a global community never before experienced.

That is it for now. I may create a category for my reading...

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