Using the AJAX Rating Component

Good news. We just released a new AJAX tutorial, Using the AJAX Rating Component. In this blog, Gail interviews Matthew Bohm, the developer who authored the Rating component. Matt had some interesting things to say about the Rating component and his other contributions to the Sun Java Studio Creator IDE. Be sure to read to the end of the blog, where we ask Matt about his interests outside of work.

Gail: Why do a Rating component?
Matt: We decided to write the Rating component for two reasons. First, it is one of the components used in the Java Pet Store. Second, AJAX is intrinsically part of the UI paradigm established by Rating components on the web; that is, they almost always use AJAX and provide a great use case for demonstrating AJAX.

Gail: Briefly explain the component.
Matt: The Rating component, of course, lets the user assign a rating to an item, such as a book or movie. It displays a row of stars the user can click on. It also can display controls to indicate the user is "not interested" in the item, to clear the rating, and to toggle between normal and average mode. There are properties for specifying the text and hover texts to be displayed. When the user assigns a rating, the client sends that rating to the server via an AJAX request, and the server sends the values of several properties back to the client via the AJAX response. There are also a number of advanced properties, including those that let you execute your own client-side scripting when the user assigns a new rating, mouses over a control, or toggles the mode.

Gail: The mode toggle feature is an innovation. Can you say more about it?
Matt: When I looked at rating controls on existing web sites, I was disappointed with how they presented the user's rating and the average rating in combination. In most cases, the user and average ratings for an item were shown in separate rating instances. In the case where they were shown in the same rating instance, the user could not view the average rating after assigning a user rating. I felt we could do better. So in the Rating component for the Java Studio Creator IDE, we have a mode toggle control that lets the user alternately view the user and average rating for an item within the same rating instance.

Gail: What's another of your favorite contributions to the Java Studio Creator IDE?
Matt: My biggest contribution is definitely the invention of virtual forms. Without them, writing applications in the IDE would be much more difficult. The team's sample application developers particularly like them.

Gail: You were a technical writer in a previous life, and we owe you a thanks for writing the script for the Rating tutorial.  What made you switch to development?
Matt: Actually, my technical writing career lasted only two months or so. I had my eye on development from the start. I was working in a data warehousing group and wrote a much-needed intranet application at a time when the development team was stretched for resources. The group's director, with whom I still keep in touch,
quickly moved me into development.

Gail: Tell me something about yourself not related to work.
Matt: I write classical music. Currently I'm setting some poems by the great Argentine poet Alejandra Pizarnik for soprano and piano. Pizarnik is not so well known; she died in 1972 at age thirty-six, and her poetry is dark and surreal. My wife, who is also a poet and Argentine, introduced me to her work.

Comments:

too cool, gail! i hope you'll continue to interview the developer team. maybe we can get matt to recite some poetry next e-team meeting...

Posted by Carla King on June 29, 2006 at 02:09 PM PDT #

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