X

Step Up to Modern Cloud Development

Developers Decide One Cloud Isn’t Enough

Bob Quillin
Vice President Developer Relations

Introduction

Developers have significantly greater choice today than even just a few years ago, when considering where to build, test and host their services and applications, deciding which clouds to move existing on-premises workloads to, and which of the multitude of open source projects to leverage. So why, in this new era of empowered developers and expanding choice, have so many organizations pursued a single cloud strategy?  The proliferation of new, cloud native open source projects and cloud service providers over recent years who have added capacity, functionality, tools, resources and services, has resulted in better performance, different cost models, and more choice for developers and DevOps engineers, while increasing competition among providers. This is leading into a new era of cloud choice, where the new norm will be dominated by a multi-cloud and hybrid cloud model.

As new cloud native design and development technologies like Kubernetes, serverless computing, and the maturing discipline of microservices emerge, they help accelerate, simplify, and expand deployment and development options. Users have the ability to leverage new technologies with their existing designs and deployments, and the flexibility they afford expands users’ option to run on many different platforms. Given this rapidly changing cloud landscape, it is not surprising that hybrid cloud and multi cloud strategies are being adopted by an increasing number of companies today. 

For a deeper dive into Prediction #7 of the 10 Predictions for Developers in 2019 offered by Siddhartha Agarwal, “Developers Decide One Cloud Isn’t Enough”, we look at the growing trend for companies and developers to choose more than one cloud provider. We’ll examine a few of the factors they consider, the needs determined by a company’s place in the development cycle, business objectives, and level of risk tolerance, and predict how certain choices will trend in 2019 and beyond.

 

Different Strokes

We are in a heterogeneous IT world today. A plethora of choice and use cases, coupled with widely varying technical and business needs and approaches to solving them, give rise to different solutions. No two are exactly the same, but development projects today typically fall within the following scenarios.

A. Born in the cloud development – these suffer little to no constraint imposed by existing applications; it is highly efficient and cost-effective to begin design in the cloud. They are naturally leveraging containers and new open source development tools like serverless (https://fnproject.io/) or service mesh platforms (e.g., Istio)  A decade ago, startup costs based on datacenter needs alone were a serious barrier to entry for budding tech companies – cloud computing has completely changed this.

B. On premises development moving to cloud – enterprises in this category have many more factors to consider. Java teams for example are rapidly adopting frameworks like Helidon and GraalVM to help them move to a microservice architecture and migrate applications to the cloud. But will greenfield development projects start only in cloud? Do they migrate legacy workloads to cloud? How do they balance existing investments with new opportunities? And what about the interface between on-premises and cloud?

C. Remaining mostly on premises but moving some services to cloud – options are expanding for those in this category. A hybrid cloud approach has been expanding, and we predict will continue to expand, over the course of at least the next few years.  The cloud native stacks available on premises now mirror the cloud native stacks in the cloud thus enabling a new generation of hybrid cloud use cases. An integrated and supported cloud native framework that spans on premises and cloud options delivers choice once again.  And, security, privacy and latency concerns will dictate some of their unique development project needs.

 

If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix It?

IT investments are real. Inertia can be hard to overcome. Let’s look at the main reasons for not distributing workloads across multiple clouds.  

  • Economy of scale tops the list, as most cloud providers will offer discounts for customers who go all in; larger workloads on one cloud provide negotiating leverage.
  • Development staff familiarity with one chosen platform makes it easier to bring on and train new developers; ramp time to productivity increases.
  • Custom features or functionality unique to the main cloud provider may need to be removed or redesigned in moving to another platform. Even on supposedly open platforms, developers must be aware of the not-so-obvious features impacting portability.
  • Geographical location of datacenters for privacy and/or latency concerns in less well-served areas of the world may also inhibit choice, or force uncomfortable trade-offs.
  • Risk mitigation is another significant factor, as enterprises seek to balance conflicting business needs with associated risks. Lean development teams often need to choose between taking on new development work vs modernizing legacy applications, when resources are scarce.

Change is Gonna Do You Good

These are valid concerns, but as dev teams look more deeply into the robust services and offerings emerging today, the trend is to diversify.

The most frequently cited concern is that of vendor lock-in. This counter-argument to that of economy of scale says that the more difficult it is to move your workloads off of one provider, the less motivated that vendor is to help reduce your cost of operations. For SMBs (small to mid-sized businesses) without a ton of leverage in comparison to large enterprises, this can be significant. Ensuring portability of workloads is important. A comprehensive cloud native infrastructure is imperative here – one that includes container orchestration but also streaming, CI/CD, and observability and analysis (e.g, Prometheus and Grafana). Containers and Kubernetes deliver portability, provided your cloud vendor uses unmodified open source code. In this model, a developer can develop their web application on their laptop, push it into a CI/CD system on one cloud, and leverage another cloud for managed Kubernetes to run their container-based app. However, the minute you start using specific APIs from the underlying platform, moving to another platform is much more difficult. AWS Lambda is one of many examples.

Mergers, acquisitions, changing business plans or practices, or other unforeseen events may impact a business at a time when they are not equipped to deal with it. Having greater flexibility to move with changing circumstances, and not being rushed into decisions, is also important. Consider for example, the merger of an organization that uses an on-premises PaaS, such as OpenShift, merging with another organization that has leveraged the public cloud across IaaS, PaaS and SaaS. It’s important to choose interoperable technologies to anticipate these scenarios.

Availability is another reason cited by customers. A thoughtfully designed multi-cloud architecture not only offers potential negotiating power as mentioned above, but also allows for failover in case of outages, DDoS attacks, local catastrophes, and the like. Larger cloud providers with massive resources and proliferation of datacenters and multiple availability domains offer a clear advantage here, but it also behooves the consumer to distribute risk across not only datacenters, but over several providers.

Another important set of factors is related to cost and ROI. Running the same workload on multiple cloud providers to compare cost and performance can help achieve business goals, and also help inform design practices.  

Adopting open source technologies enables businesses to choose where to run their applications based on the criteria they deem most important, be they technical, cost, business, compliance, or regulatory concerns. Moving to open source thus opens up the possibility to run applications on any cloud. That is, any CNCF-certified Kubernetes managed cloud service can safely run Kubernetes – so enterprises can take advantage of this key benefit to drive a multi-cloud strategy.

The trend in 2019 is moving strongly in the direction of design practices that support all aspects of a business’s goals, with the best offers, pricing and practices from multiple providers. This direction makes enterprises more competitive – maximally productive, cost-effective, secure, available, and flexible regarding platform choice.

 

Design for Flexibility

Though having a multi-cloud strategy seems to be the growing trend, it does come with some inherent challenges. To address issues like interoperability among multiple providers and establishing depth of expertise with a single cloud provider, we’re seeing an increased use of different technologies that help to abstract away some of the infrastructure interoperability hiccups. This is particularly important to developers, who seek the best available technologies that fit their specific needs.

Serverless computing seeks to reduce the awareness of any notion of infrastructure. Consider it similar to water or electricity utilities – once you have attached your own minimal home infrastructure to the endpoint offered by the utility, you simply turn on the tap or light switch, and pay for what you consume. The service scales automatically – for all intents and purposes, you may consume as much output of the utility or service as desired, and the bill goes up and down accordingly. When you are not consuming the service, there is no (or almost no) overhead.  

Development teams are picking cloud vendors based on capabilities they need. This is especially true in SaaS. SaaS is a cloud-based software delivery model with payment based on usage, rather than license or support-based pricing. The SaaS provider develops, maintains and updates the software, along with the hardware, middleware, application software, and security. SaaS customers can more easily predict total cost of ownership with greater accuracy. The more modern, complete SaaS solutions also allow for greater ease of configuration and personalization, and offer embedded analytics, data portability, cloud security, support for emerging technologies, and connected, end-to-end business processes.

Serverless computing not only provides simplicity through abstraction of infrastructure, its design patterns also promote the use of third-party managed services whenever possible. This provides flexibility and allows you to choose the best solution for your problem from the growing suite of products and services available in the cloud, from software-defined networking and API gateways, to databases and managed streaming services. In this design paradigm, everything within an application that is not purely business logic can be efficiently outsourced.

More and more companies are finding it increasingly easy to connect elements together with Serverless functionality for the desired business logic and design goals. Serverless deployments talking to multiple endpoints can run almost anywhere; serverless becomes the “glue” that is used to make use of the best services available, from any provider.

Serverless deployments can be run anywhere, even on multiple cloud platforms. Hence flexibility of choice expands even further, making it arguably the best design option for those desiring portability and openness.

 

Summary

There are many pieces required to deliver a successful multi-cloud approach. Modern developers use specific criteria to validate if a particular cloud is “open” and whether or not it supports a multi-cloud approach. Does it have the ability to

  • extract/export data without incurring significant expense or overhead?
  • be deployed either on-premises or in the public cloud, including for custom applications, integrations between applications, etc.?
  • monitor and manage applications that might reside on-premises or in other clouds from a single console, with the ability to aggregate monitoring/management data?

And does it have a good set of APIs that enables access to everything in the UI via an API? Does it expose all the business logic and data required by the application? Does it have SSO capability across applications?

The CNCF (Cloud Native Computing Foundation) has over 400 cloud provider, user, and supporter members, and its working groups and cloud events specification engage these and thousands more in the ongoing mission to make cloud native computing ubiquitous, and allow engineers to make high-impact changes frequently and predictably with minimal toil.

We predict this trend will continue well beyond 2019 as CNCF drives adoption of this paradigm by fostering and sustaining an ecosystem of open source, vendor-neutral projects, and democratizing state-of-the-art patterns to make these innovations accessible for everyone.

Oracle is a platinum member of CNCF, along with 17 other major cloud providers. We are serious about our commitment to open source, open development practices, and sharing our expertise via technical tutorials, talks at meetups and conferences, and helping businesses succeed. Learn more and engage with us at cloudnative.oracle.com, and we’d love to hear if you agree with the predictions expressed in this post. 

Be the first to comment

Comments ( 0 )
Please enter your name.Please provide a valid email address.Please enter a comment.CAPTCHA challenge response provided was incorrect. Please try again.

Recent Content