Thursday Sep 27, 2007

Improving the Java User Experience

Jeff Hoffman has been designing developer and consumer software at Sun since before the boom.

Pop Quiz: What is the application, delivered by Sun, that is most used by people around the globe?

Answer:

There are about 1 million successful installations of Java every day using the Java installer (the installer is just needed for the Windows platform, because Java is already included with Solaris and many Linux distributions, and Apple provides their own Java installer). With all those eyes on it, the installer design receives a lot of attention. The Java installation process may be the first experience that a customer has with Sun and we do our best to make this experience simple, fast, and aesthetically pleasing.

From the user's perspective, the installation process usually starts at a third-party website, which needs the latest Java version to run an applet. The applet could be a game (pogo.com), a map locator (map24.com), or the virtual view of a cruise ship cabin (princess.com). The Java installation experience presents a unique challenge for Sun -- we wanted to make this experience positive for the end user, while providing brand recognition for both Sun and the applet's provider.

Let's have a look at the old installation experience:

The user starts at a third-party website by clicking the "Get Java" graphic which leads to the download and enables them to install the latest version of the Java runtime environment. This download page is simple and straight forward, containing a single button to begin downloading the Java software. The default "automatic" installation process from Internet Explorer involves downloading a small application, which launches the Java installer UI and then continues to download the files that contain the Java runtime environment.

This installer design attempted to reduce the number of panels by putting more "decision points" on a panel -- for example, the initial panel had three purposes:

  1. confirm that Java was to be installed
  2. Display the license agreement and get the user to agree
  3. Provide typical and custom option radio buttons

The design placed too much information on a single installer panel making it appear complicated to the typical consumer. Other installer panels were not visually attractive due to spacing and alignment issues.

We had a couple goals for our redesign of the Java 5.0 installer. The first goal was to keep the number of steps to a minimum, making sure that each step had only one necessary decision point. While creating the current design, the challenge of incorporating the variability (when the user will see a third party offer, does the user have to restart their browser) meant that we had to spec out the various paths and ensure that they made sense. Also de-emphasizing the "custom" install options was necessary.

The second goal was to manage the changing nature of the steps. Our installer has the capability of offering third-party bundled software, such as the Google toolbar. This offer is only shown if the user does not currently have the offered software, or if they have an outdated version. The design of these optional panels needed to be modular so that they would not disrupt the flow of the installation process.

So now lets look at the new Java installer design:

The first panel of the Java installer UI confirms that the user is installing Java, and gives them pointers to important information like our privacy policy and license agreement.

It's still possible for a more advanced user to customize parameters of the install, but since this level of control is not necessary for most users, this feature is not checked by default and placed out of the main control flow. A single click on the first installer panel both accepts the license agreement and continues the installation of Java.

A second panel may appear, offering the user a bundled installation (for example, the Google toolbar).

The next panel (not shown here) shows the progress of the installation process and a message to reinforce the Java brand. When the installation completes, the user is shown the last panel of the installer, which confirms that the Java software was installed without incident. On this last panel, the user may see a checkbox to restart their web browser.

These improvements are already available in the latest release of Java 6. If you want to know about other improvements that have been made in the Java installation and deployment arena, keep a look out for a future blog entry.

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xDesign is a software user experience design group at Sun.
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