Friday Nov 23, 2012

Java @Contended annotation to help reduce false sharing

See this posting by Aleksey Shipilev for details -- @Contended is something we've wanted for a long time. The JVM provides automatic layout and placement of fields. Usually it'll (a) sort fields by descending size to improve footprint, and (b) pack reference fields so the garbage collector can process a contiguous run of reference fields when tracing. @Contended gives the program a way to provide more explicit guidance with respect to concurrency and false sharing. Using this facility we can sequester hot frequently written shared fields away from other mostly read-only or cold fields. The simple rule is that read-sharing is cheap, and write-sharing is very expensive. We can also pack fields together that tend to be written together by the same thread at about the same time.

More generally, we're trying to influence relative field placement to minimize coherency misses. In a simple single-threaded environment fields that are accessed closely together in time should be placed proximally in space to promote cache locality. That is, temporal locality should condition spatial locality. Fields accessed together in time should be nearby in space. That having been said, when threads are accessing our fields concurrently we have to be careful to avoid false sharing and excessive invalidation from coherence traffic. As such, we try to cluster or otherwise sequester fields that tend to written at approximately the same time by the same thread onto the same cache line. Note that there's a tension at play: if we try too hard to minimize single-threaded capacity misses then we can end up with excessive coherency misses running in a parallel environment. In native C/C++ code it's fairly typical for programmers to use informed concurrency-aware structure layout. @Contended should give use the same capability in Java, although in native code the binding of fields to offsets happens at compile-time, while it happens at load-time for the Java. It's worth pointing out that in the general case there is no single optimal layout for both single-thread and multithreaded environments. And the ideal layout problem itself is NP-hard.

Ideally, a JVM would employ hardware monitoring facilities to detect sharing behavior and change the layout on the fly. That's a bit difficult as we don't yet have the right plumbing to provide efficient and expedient information to the JVM. Hint: we need to disintermediate the OS and hypervisor. Another challenge is that raw field offsets are used in the unsafe facility, so we'd need to address that issue, possibly with an extra level of indirection.

Finally, I'd like to be able to pack final fields together as well, as those are known to be read-only.

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Dave

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