Monday Sep 15, 2014

Oracle SQL Developer & Data Modeler Support for Oracle Big Data SQL

Oracle SQL Developer and Data Modeler (version 4.0.3) now support Hive and Oracle Big Data SQL.  The tools allow you to connect to Hive, use the SQL Worksheet to query, create and alter Hive tables, and automatically generate Big Data SQL-enabled Oracle external tables that dynamically access data sources defined in the Hive metastore.  

Let's take a look at what it takes to get started and then preview this new capability.

Setting up Connections to Hive

The first thing you need to do is set up a JDBC connection to Hive.  Follow these steps to set up the connection:

Download and Unzip JDBC Drivers

Cloudera provides high performance JDBC drivers that are required for connectivity:

  • Download the Hive Drivers from the Cloudera Downloads page to a local directory
  • Unzip the archive
    • unzip Cloudera_HiveJDBC_2.5.4.1006.zip
  • Two zip files are contained within the archive.  Unzip the JDBC4 archive to a target directory that is accessible to SQL Developer (e.g. /home/oracle/jdbc below): 
    • unzip Cloudera_HiveJDBC4_2.5.4.1006.zip -d /home/oracle/jdbc/

Now that the JDBC drivers have been extracted, update SQL Developer to use the new drivers.

Update SQL Developer to use the Cloudera Hive JDBC Drivers

Update the preferences in SQL Developer to leverage the new drivers:

  • Start SQL Developer
  • Go to Tools -> Preferences
  • Navigate to Database -> Third Party JDBC Drivers
  • Add all of the jar files contained in the zip to the Third-party JDBC Driver Path.  It should look like the picture below:
    sql developer preferences

  • Restart SQL Developer

Create a Connection

Now that SQL Developer is configured to access Hive, let's create a connection to Hiveserver2.  Click the New Connection button in the SQL Developer toolbar.  You'll need to have an ID, password and the port where Hiveserver2 is running:

connect to hiveserver2

The example above is creating a connection called hive which connects to Hiveserver2 on localhost running on port 10000.  The Database field is optional; here we are specifying the default database.

Using the Hive Connection

The Hive connection is now treated like any other connection in SQL Developer.  The tables are organized into Hive databases; you can review the tables' data, properties, partitions, indexes, details and DDL:

sqldeveloper - view data in hive

And, you can use the SQL Worksheet to run custom queries, perform DDL operations - whatever is supported in Hive:

worksheet

Here, we've altered the definition of a hive table and then queried that table in the worksheet.

Create Big Data SQL-enabled Tables Using Oracle Data Modeler

Oracle Data Modeler automates the definition of Big Data SQL-enabled external tables.  Let's create a few tables using the metadata from the Hive Metastore.  Invoke the import wizard by selecting the File->Import->Data Modeler->Data Dictionary menu item.  You will see the same connections found in the SQL Developer connection navigator:

pick a connection

After selecting the hive connection and a database, select the tables to import:

pick tables to import

There could be any number of tables here - in our case we will select three tables to import.  After completing the import, the logical table definitions appear in our palette:

imported tables

You can update the logical table definitions - and in our case we will want to do so.  For example, the recommended column in Hive is defined as a string (i.e. there is no precision) - which the Data Modeler casts as a varchar2(4000).  We have domain knowledge and understand that this field is really much smaller - so we'll update it to the appropriate size:

update prop

Now that we're comfortable with the table definitions, let's generate the DDL and create the tables in Oracle Database 12c.  Use the Data Modeler DDL Preview to generate the DDL for those tables - and then apply the definitions in the Oracle Database SQL Worksheet:

preview ddl

Edit the Table Definitions

The SQL Developer table editor has been updated so that it now understands all of the properties that control Big Data SQL external table processing.  For example, edit table movieapp_log_json:

edit table props

You can update the source cluster for the data, how invalid records should be processed, how to map hive table columns to the corresponding Oracle table columns (if they don't match), and much more.

Query All Your Data

You now have full Oracle SQL access to data across the platform.  In our example, we can combine data from Hadoop with data in our Oracle Database.  The data in Hadoop can be in any format - Avro, json, XML, csv - if there is a SerDe that can parse the data - then Big Data SQL can access it!  Below, we're combining click data from the JSON-based movie application log with data in our Oracle Database tables to determine how the company's customers rate blockbuster movies:

compare to blockbuster movies

Looks like they don't think too highly of them! Of course - the ratings data is fictitious ;)

Monday Jan 27, 2014

Announcing: Oracle Big Data Lite Virtual Machine

You've been hearing alot about Oracle's big data platform. Today, we're pleased to announce Oracle Big Data Lite Virtual Machine - an environment to help you get started with the platform. And, we have a great OTN Virtual Developer Day event scheduled where you can start using our big data products as part of a series of workshops.


BigDataLite Picture

Oracle Big Data Lite Virtual Machine is an Oracle VM VirtualBox that contains many key components of Oracle's big data platform, including: Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition, Oracle Advanced Analytics, Oracle NoSQL Database, Cloudera Distribution including Apache Hadoop, Oracle Data Integrator 12c, Oracle Big Data Connectors, and more. It's been configured to run on a "developer class" computer; all Big Data Lite needs is a couple of cores and about 5GB memory to run (this means that your computer should have at least 8GB total memory). With Big Data Lite, you can develop your big data applications and then deploy them to the Oracle Big Data Appliance. Or, you can use Big Data Lite as a client to the BDA during application development.

How do you get started? Why not start by registering for the Virtual Developer Day scheduled for Tuesday, February 4, 2014 - 9am  to 1pm PT / 12pm to 4pm ET / 3pm to 7pm BRT:

OTN_VDD

There will be 45 minute sessions delivered by product experts (from both Oracle and Oracle Aces) - highlighted by Tom Kyte and Jonathan Lewis' keynote "Landscape of Oracle Database Technology Evolution". Some of the big data technical sessions include:

  • Oracle NoSQL Database Installation and Cluster Topology Deployment
  • Application Development & Schema Design with Oracle NoSQL Database
  • Processing Twitter Data with Hadoop
  • Use Data from a Hadoop Cluster with Oracle Database
  • Make the Right Offers to Customers Using Oracle Advanced Analytics
  • In-DB Map Reduce with SQL/Hadoop
  • Pattern Matching in SQL

Keep an eye on this space - we'll be publishing how-to's that leverage the new Oracle Big Data Lite VM. And, of course, we'd love to hear about the clever applications you build as well!

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The data warehouse insider is written by the Oracle product management team and sheds lights on all thing data warehousing and big data.

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