Tuesday Nov 12, 2013

Big Data Appliance X4-2 Release Announcement

Today we are announcing the release of the 3rd generation Big Data Appliance. Read the Press Release here.

Software Focus

The focus for this 3rd generation of Big Data Appliance is:

  • Comprehensive and Open - Big Data Appliance now includes all Cloudera Software, including Back-up and Disaster Recovery (BDR), Search, Impala, Navigator as well as the previously included components (like CDH, HBase and Cloudera Manager) and Oracle NoSQL Database (CE or EE).
  • Lower TCO then DIY Hadoop Systems
  • Simplified Operations while providing an open platform for the organization
  • Comprehensive security including the new Audit Vault and Database Firewall software, Apache Sentry and Kerberos configured out-of-the-box

Hardware Update

A good place to start is to quickly review the hardware differences (no price changes!). On a per node basis the following is a comparison between old and new (X3-2) hardware:


Big Data Appliance X3-2

Big Data Appliance X4-2

CPU

2 x 8-Core Intel® Xeon® E5-2660 (2.2 GHz)
2 x 8-Core Intel® Xeon® E5-2650 V2 (2.6 GHz)
Memory
64GB
64GB
Disk

12 x 3TB High Capacity SAS

12 x 4TB High Capacity SAS
InfiniBand
40Gb/sec
40Gb/sec
Ethernet
10Gb/sec
10Gb/sec

For all the details on the environmentals and other useful information, review the data sheet for Big Data Appliance X4-2. The larger disks give BDA X4-2 33% more capacity over the previous generation while adding faster CPUs. Memory for BDA is expandable to 512 GB per node and can be done on a per-node basis, for example for NameNodes or for HBase region servers, or for NoSQL Database nodes.

Software Details

More details in terms of software and the current versions (note BDA follows a three monthly update cycle for Cloudera and other software):


Big Data Appliance 2.2 Software Stack Big Data Appliance 2.3 Software Stack
Linux
Oracle Linux 5.8 with UEK 1
Oracle Linux 6.4 with UEK 2
JDK
JDK 6
JDK 7
Cloudera CDH
CDH 4.3
CDH 4.4
Cloudera Manager
CM 4.6
CM 4.7

And like we said at the beginning it is important to understand that all other Cloudera components are now included in the price of Oracle Big Data Appliance. They are fully supported by Oracle and available for all BDA customers.

For more information:



Monday Nov 04, 2013

New Big Data Appliance Security Features

The Oracle Big Data Appliance (BDA) is an engineered system for big data processing.  It greatly simplifies the deployment of an optimized Hadoop Cluster – whether that cluster is used for batch or real-time processing.  The vast majority of BDA customers are integrating the appliance with their Oracle Databases and they have certain expectations – especially around security.  Oracle Database customers have benefited from a rich set of security features:  encryption, redaction, data masking, database firewall, label based access control – and much, much more.  They want similar capabilities with their Hadoop cluster.   

Unfortunately, Hadoop wasn’t developed with security in mind.  By default, a Hadoop cluster is insecure – the antithesis of an Oracle Database.  Some critical security features have been implemented – but even those capabilities are arduous to setup and configure.  Oracle believes that a key element of an optimized appliance is that its data should be secure.  Therefore, by default the BDA delivers the “AAA of security”: authentication, authorization and auditing.

Security Starts at Authentication

A successful security strategy is predicated on strong authentication – for both users and software services.  Consider the default configuration for a newly installed Oracle Database; it’s been a long time since you had a legitimate chance at accessing the database using the credentials “system/manager” or “scott/tiger”.  The default Oracle Database policy is to lock accounts thereby restricting access; administrators must consciously grant access to users.

Default Authentication in Hadoop

By default, a Hadoop cluster fails the authentication test. For example, it is easy for a malicious user to masquerade as any other user on the system.  Consider the following scenario that illustrates how a user can access any data on a Hadoop cluster by masquerading as a more privileged user.  In our scenario, the Hadoop cluster contains sensitive salary information in the file /user/hrdata/salaries.txt.  When logged in as the hr user, you can see the following files.  Notice, we’re using the Hadoop command line utilities for accessing the data:

$ hadoop fs -ls /user/hrdata

Found 1 items
-rw-r--r--   1 oracle supergroup         70 2013-10-31 10:38 /user/hrdata/salaries.txt

$ hadoop fs -cat /user/hrdata/salaries.txt
Tom Brady,11000000
Tom Hanks,5000000
Bob Smith,250000
Oprah,300000000

User DrEvil has access to the cluster – and can see that there is an interesting folder called “hrdata”. 

$ hadoop fs -ls /user
Found 1 items
drwx------   - hr supergroup          0 2013-10-31 10:38 /user/hrdata

However, DrEvil cannot view the contents of the folder due to lack of access privileges:

$ hadoop fs -ls /user/hrdata
ls: Permission denied: user=drevil, access=READ_EXECUTE, inode="/user/hrdata":oracle:supergroup:drwx------

Accessing this data will not be a problem for DrEvil. He knows that the hr user owns the data by looking at the folder’s ACLs. To overcome this challenge, he will simply masquerade as the hr user. On his local machine, he adds the hr user, assigns that user a password, and then accesses the data on the Hadoop cluster:

$ sudo useradd hr
$ sudo passwd
$ su hr
$ hadoop fs -cat /user/hrdata/salaries.txt
Tom Brady,11000000
Tom Hanks,5000000
Bob Smith,250000
Oprah,300000000

Hadoop has not authenticated the user; it trusts that the identity that has been presented is indeed the hr user. Therefore, sensitive data has been easily compromised. Clearly, the default security policy is inappropriate and dangerous to many organizations storing critical data in HDFS.

Big Data Appliance Provides Secure Authentication

The BDA provides secure authentication to the Hadoop cluster by default – preventing the type of masquerading described above. It accomplishes this thru Kerberos integration.


Figure 1: Kerberos Integration

The Key Distribution Center (KDC) is a server that has two components: an authentication server and a ticket granting service. The authentication server validates the identity of the user and service. Once authenticated, a client must request a ticket from the ticket granting service – allowing it to access the BDA’s NameNode, JobTracker, etc.

At installation, you simply point the BDA to an external KDC or automatically install a highly available KDC on the BDA itself. Kerberos will then provide strong authentication for not just the end user – but also for important Hadoop services running on the appliance. You can now guarantee that users are who they claim to be – and rogue services (like fake data nodes) are not added to the system.

It is common for organizations to want to leverage existing LDAP servers for common user and group management. Kerberos integrates with LDAP servers – allowing the principals and encryption keys to be stored in the common repository. This simplifies the deployment and administration of the secure environment.

Authorize Access to Sensitive Data

Kerberos-based authentication ensures secure access to the system and the establishment of a trusted identity – a prerequisite for any authorization scheme. Once this identity is established, you need to authorize access to the data. HDFS will authorize access to files using ACLs with the authorization specification applied using classic Linux-style commands like chmod and chown (e.g. hadoop fs -chown oracle:oracle /user/hrdata changes the ownership of the /user/hrdata folder to oracle). Authorization is applied at the user or group level – utilizing group membership found in the Linux environment (i.e. /etc/group) or in the LDAP server.

For SQL-based data stores – like Hive and Impala – finer grained access control is required. Access to databases, tables, columns, etc. must be controlled. And, you want to leverage roles to facilitate administration.

Apache Sentry is a new project that delivers fine grained access control; both Cloudera and Oracle are the project’s founding members. Sentry satisfies the following three authorization requirements:

  • Secure Authorization:  the ability to control access to data and/or privileges on data for authenticated users.
  • Fine-Grained Authorization:  the ability to give users access to a subset of the data (e.g. column) in a database
  • Role-Based Authorization:  the ability to create/apply template-based privileges based on functional roles.
With Sentry, “all”, “select” or “insert” privileges are granted to an object. The descendants of that object automatically inherit that privilege. A collection of privileges across many objects may be aggregated into a role – and users/groups are then assigned that role. This leads to simplified administration of security across the system.

Sentry Object Hieararchy

Figure 2: Object Hierarchy – granting a privilege on the database object will be inherited by its tables and views.

Sentry is currently used by both Hive and Impala – but it is a framework that other data sources can leverage when offering fine-grained authorization. For example, one can expect Sentry to deliver authorization capabilities to Cloudera Search in the near future.

Audit Hadoop Cluster Activity

Auditing is a critical component to a secure system and is oftentimes required for SOX, PCI and other regulations. The BDA integrates with Oracle Audit Vault and Database Firewall – tracking different types of activity taking place on the cluster:


Figure 3: Monitored Hadoop services.

At the lowest level, every operation that accesses data in HDFS is captured. The HDFS audit log identifies the user who accessed the file, the time that file was accessed, the type of access (read, write, delete, list, etc.) and whether or not that file access was successful. The other auditing features include:

  • MapReduce:  correlate the MapReduce job that accessed the file
  • Oozie:  describes who ran what as part of a workflow
  • Hive:  captures changes were made to the Hive metadata

The audit data is captured in the Audit Vault Server – which integrates audit activity from a variety of sources, adding databases (Oracle, DB2, SQL Server) and operating systems to activity from the BDA.

Audit Vault Server

Figure 4: Consolidated audit data across the enterprise. 

Once the data is in the Audit Vault server, you can leverage a rich set of prebuilt and custom reports to monitor all the activity in the enterprise. In addition, alerts may be defined to trigger violations of audit policies.

Conclusion

Security cannot be considered an afterthought in big data deployments. Across most organizations, Hadoop is managing sensitive data that must be protected; it is not simply crunching publicly available information used for search applications. The BDA provides a strong security foundation – ensuring users are only allowed to view authorized data and that data access is audited in a consolidated framework.

Tuesday Oct 15, 2013

Are you ready for Hadoop?

To find out, take the assessment here. Have fun!

Wednesday Oct 09, 2013

Big Data Openworld Sessions now available for Download/Viewing

For those who did go to Openworld, the session catalog now has the download links to the session materials online. You can now refresh your memory and share your experience with the rest of your organization. For those who did not go, here is your chance to look over some of the materials.

On the big data side, here are some of the highlights:

There are a great number of other sessions, simply look for: Solutions => Big Data and Business Analytics and you will find a wealth of interesting content around big data, Hadoop and analytics.

Sentry Meetup at Strata + Hadoop World 2013

Meetup Details and Exact Location Here

Join us for the inaugural Apache Sentry meetup at Oracle's offices in NYC, on the evening of the last day of Strata + Hadoop World 2013 in New York. 

(@ Oracle Offices, 120 Park Ave, 26th Floor -- Note: Bring your ID and check in with security in the lobby!)

We'll kick-off the meetup with the following presentation:

Getting Serious about Security with Sentry

Presenters: 
Shreepadma Venugopalan - Lead Engineer for Sentry
Arvind Prabhakar - Engineering Manager for Sentry 
Jacco Draaijer - Development Manager for Oracle Big Data

Apache Hadoop offers strong support for authentication and coarse grained authorization - but this is not necessarily enough to meet the demands of enterprise applications and compliance requirements. Providing fine-grained access to data will enable organizations to store more sensitive information in Hadoop; only those users with the appropriate privileges will ever see that sensitive data.

Cloudera and Oracle are taking the lead on Sentry - a new open source authorization module that integrates with Hadoop-based SQL query engines. Key developers for the project will provide details on its implementation, including:

-Motivations for the project
-Key requirements that Sentry satisfies
-Utilizing Sentry in your applications
-Future plans

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Big Data at Openworld 2013

To start of Openword on Monday morning (Sept 23), Mark Hurd is using his keynote to talk about how businesses can transform themselves using big data and analytics. Given all the hype around these two hope topics this keynote will look at the promise of big data and how it enables your business to leverage a range of information to provide new services, operate more efficiently, and market more effectively.

This keynote will include key Oracle customers and other Oracle experts who will explain how to harness the value of big data; craft an IT strategy to stream, acquire, organize and analyze to make transformational decisions about business operations and products and services.

The Data Warehousing and Big Data Guide include details of this important keynote and on all the other interesting sessions around big data and big data appliance.

You can download the iBook, PDF and calendar using the following links:

The guide is available in both Apple iBook format  (click here - please note this file is 200MB because it is packed full of videos, slideshows and other unique iBook features) for iPad and iPad Mini uses and PDF format  (click here) for all other platforms. (Please note that in PDF format some of the iBook features will not work such as the URL links that provide cross-referencing bookmarks and built-in 12c videos will not work).

There is a downloadable calendar (.ics file) available here which includes all the sessions, keynotes and hands-on labs listed in this guide. You can import this file into your own calendar application. Details of how to do this are included in this guide, see chapter 3.

Enjoy OpenWorld 2013  and if you have time please stop by the data warehouse section of the demo grounds and say hello.

Wednesday Jul 17, 2013

Oracle: Big Data at Work

There is a lot of hype around big data, but here at Oracle we try to help customers implement big data solutions to solve real business problems. For those of you interested in understanding more about how you can put big data to work at your organization, consider joining these events:

San Jose | August 5 - 6
Marriott San Jose
301 S Market St, San Jose, California 95113
Event Registration Page
Chicago | August 7 - 8
The Westin Michigan Avenue
909 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611

New York | August 12 - 13
Marriott Marquis Times Square
1535 Broadway, New York, NY 10036
Event Registration Page

Enjoy!

Friday May 10, 2013

Streaming data to and from Hadoop and NoSQL Database

A quick update on some of the integration components needed to build things like M2M (Machine 2 Machine communication) and on integrating fast moving data (events) with the Hadoop and NoSQL Database. As of 11.1.1.7 of the Oracle Event Processing product you now have:

OEP Data Cartridge for Hadoop (the real doc is here)

OEP Data Cartridge for NoSQL Database (the real doc is here)

The fun with these products is that you can now model (in a UI!!) how to interact with these products. For example you can sink data into Hadoop without impacting the stream logic and stream performance and you can do a quick CQL (the OEP language) lookup to our NoSQL DB to resolve for example a customer profile or status lookup.

More to come, but very interesting and really something cool on making products work together out of the box.

Friday May 03, 2013

Videos: How to build out an end-to-end Big Data System

For those interested in understanding how to actually build a big data solution including things like NoSQL Database, Hadoop, MapReduce, Hive, Pig and Analytics (data mining, R) have a look at the big data videos Marty did:

  • Video 1: Using Big Data to Improve the Customer Experience
  • Video 2: Using Big Data to Deliver a Personalized Service
  • Video 3: Using Big Data and NoSQL to Manage On-line Profiles
  • Video 4: Oracle Big Data and Hadoop to Process Log Files
  • Video 5: Integrate All your data with Big Data Connectors
  • Video 6: Maximizing business impact with Big Data

Happy watching and learning.

Thursday Apr 11, 2013

Big Data Appliance - more flexibility, same rapid time to value

Untitled Document

This week Oracle announced the availability (yes you can right away buy and use these systems) to Big Data Appliance X3-2 Starter Rack and Big Data Appliance X3-2 In-Rack Expansion. You can read the press release here. For those who are interested in the operating specs, best to look at the data sheet on OTN.

So what does this mean? In effect this means that you can now start any big data project with an appliance. Whether you are looking to try your hand on your first project with Hadoop, or whether you are building your enterprise Hadoop solution with a large number of nodes, you can now get the benefits of Oracle Big Data Appliance. By leveraging Big Data Appliance for all your big data needs (being this Hadoop or Oracle NoSQL Database) you always get:

  • Reduced risk by having the best of Oracle and Cloudera engineering available in an easy to consume appliance
  • Faster time to value by not spending weeks or months building and tuning your own Hadoop system
  • No cost creep for the cluster as your system is set up and configured for a known cost

Assume you want to start your first implementation on Hadoop, you can now start with the BDA Starter Rack, 6 servers which you can fully deploy for HDFS and MapReduce capabilities (of course we also support for example HBase). All the services are pre-configured, so you have Highly Available NameNodes, automatic failover and a balanced approach to leveraging the 6 servers as Hadoop nodes.As your project grows (and you need more compute power and space to store data) you simply add nodes in chunks of 6 using the In-Rack Expansion, filling up the rack.

Once full you can either add another Starter Rack or add Full Racks to the system. As you do that, Mammoth - the install, configure and patch utility for BDA - ensures that your service nodes are in the appropriate place. For example, once you have 2 cabinets assigned to a single cluster, Mammoth will move the second NameNode to the second Rack for higher fault tolerance.

This new release of Big Data Appliance (the software parts of it) now also include Cloudera CDH 4.2 and Cloudera Manager 4.5. On top of that, you now create multiple clusters on a single BDA Full Rack using just Mammoth, which means you can now patch and update individual clusters on that Full Rack. As you add nodes to a cluster, Mammoth will allow you to choose where to add nodes, how to grow a set of clusters, etc.

Lastly, but not least, there is more flexibility in how to acquire Big Data Appliance Full Rack, as it is now a part of Oracle's Infrastructure as a Service offering, allowing for a smooth capital outflow for your Big Data Appliance. 

Tuesday Mar 05, 2013

Hadoop Cluster: Build vs. Buy (part II)

About a year ago we did a comparison (with an update here) of Build your Own Hadoop cluster and a Big Data Appliance, where we focused purely on the hardware and software cost. We thought it could use an update, but luckily an analyst firm did one for us and this time it covers both the Hardware/Software costs, but also ventures a lot more into dealing with other costs.

Read all about it in ESG's Getting Real About Big Data, Build vs Buy (Feb 2013) here.

Some highlights from the report:

  • Oracle Big Data Appliance($450k) is 39% less costly than "build your own"($733k) 
  • OBDA reduces time-to-market by 33% vs "build"

But, the report is not just about those numbers, it covers a number of very interesting things like 3 Hadoop Myths, the importance of big data in the near future and the priority customers give to improving their analytics footprint.

Enjoy the read!


Wednesday Feb 20, 2013

Looking for tools to solve your big data problems?

Look no further, Infosys today announced its Infosys BigDataEdge developer platform to drive value from your big data stack. 

By empowering business users to rapidly develop insights from vast amounts of structured and unstructured data, better business decisions can be made in near real-time. With Infosys BigDataEdge, enterprises can reduce the time taken to extract information by up to 40 percent and generate insights up to eight times faster.

Read More.

Wednesday Jan 30, 2013

Parallel R: Quick Ways Model More

Introduction

I am less and less often mistaken for a pirate when I mention the R language.  While I miss the excuse to wear an eyepatch, I'm glad more people are beginning to explore a statistical language I've been touting for years.  When it comes to plotting or running complex statistics in a single line of code, R is a great tool to have.  That said, there are plenty of pitfalls for the casual or new user: syntax, learning to write vectorized code, or even just knowing which "apply" function you really should choose.

  I want to explore a slightly less-often considered aspect of R development: parallelism.  Out of the box, R can seem very limited to someone used to working on compute clusters or even a multicore server.  However, there are a few tricks we can leverage to get the most out of R on everything from a personal workstation to a Hadoop cluster.

 R is Single-Threaded

The R interpreter is -- and likely always will be -- single-threaded.  This means loading data frames is done in a single thread.  So is building your linear model, or generating that pretty surface plot.  Even on my laptop, that's a lot of threads to not use for modeling.  No matter how much my web browser might covet those cycles, I'd like to use them for work.

Rather than a complex multithreaded re-implementation, the R interpreter offers a number of ways to allow users to selectively apply parallelism.  Some of these approaches leverage MPI libraries and mirror that message passing approach.  Others allow a more implicit parallelism via "foreach" or "apply" constructs. We'll just focus on a pair of strategies using the parallelism that's been included in R since it's 2.14.1 version: the parallel library.

 Setting The Stage for Parallel Execution

We're going to need to load a few libraries into our R session before we can execute anything outside of our single-thread.  We'll use the doParallel and foreach because they allow us to focus on what to parallelize rather than how to coordinate our threads.

> data(iris)
library(parallel)
library(iterators)
library(doParallel)
library(foreach)

Knowing that calculations in R will be single-threaded, we want to use the parallel package to operate on logical subsets of the data simultaneously.  For example, I loaded a set of data about Iris which contains a number of different species.  One way I might want to parallelize is to fit the same each species simultaneously.  For that, I'm going to have to split the data by species:

> species.split <- split(iris, iris$Species)

 This gives us a list we can iterate over -- or parallelize.  From here on out, it's simply a question of deciding what resources we want to leverage: local CPUs or remote hosts.

FORKs and SOCKs

We're going to use the makeCluster function to bind together a set of computational resources.  But first we need to decide: do we want to use only local CPUs, or is it necessary to open up socket connections to other machines distribute our workload?  In the former case we'll use makeCluster to create what's called a FORK cluster (in that it uses UNIX's fork call to create slaves).  In the latter, we'll create a SOCK cluster by opening up sockets to a list of remote hosts and starting slave processes on them.

Here's a FORK cluster which uses all my cores:

> cl <- makeCluster(detectCores())
registerDoParallel(cl)

And here's a SOCK cluster across three nodes (password-less SSH is required)

> hostlist <- c("10.0.0.1", "10.0.0.2", "10.0.0.3")
cl <- makeCluster(hostlist)
registerDoParallel(cl)

In each case, I call registerDoParallel to bind this cluster to the %dopar% operator.  This is the operator which will let us easily iterate in parallel.

Running in Parallel

Once we've got something to iterate over and a cluster with which to do it, modeling in parallel becomes straightforward.  Suppose I want to fit a model of sepal length as a linear combination of petal characteristics.  In that case, the code is simply:

> species.models <- foreach(i=species.split) %dopar% {
m<-lm(i$Sepal.Length ~ i$Petal.Width*i$Petal.Length);
return(m)
}

But I'm not just restricted to fitting linear models on my little cluster.  I can run k-means clustering for several different k simultaneously using basically the same block:

> species.clusters<- foreach(i=2:5) %dopar% {
km <- kmeans(iris, i);
return(km)
}

When I'm done with my block, I can just call stopCluster(cl) to ensure my processes terminate and I'm not hogging resources.

Using Hadoop

Finally, there will be situations in which I need to deploy in parallel against much larger datasets -- specifically, datasets stored in HDFS.  Both Hive and Pig will let me run an R script as part of a streaming process.  In Hive, the TRANSFORM operator will send data to an R Script.  In Pig, you can use theSTREAM operator to send a whole bag to an R script.  However, you can't stream from within Pig'sFOREACH blocks, so I occasionally use a UDF which invokes R scripts for me.

Regardless of the method you choose to send HDFS data to an R process, it's important to make sure your R script can consume data streaming from standard input.  I find the most expedient way of doing this via the file function.  A typical script might start:

#! /usr/bin/env Rscript
#Connection to STDIN for reading a data frame
con <- file(description="stdin")
my.data.frame <- read.table(con, header=FALSE, sep=",")

Summary

We've covered several ways to push R beyond the the bounds of its single-threaded core.  There are forking and socket mechanisms for spreading our work around, not to mention tricks for leveraging the power of Hadoop Streaming.  In each case, however, one thing stands out: we must be smart as modelers and understand what can and should be done in parallel.

[Read More]

Monday Jan 28, 2013

First Oracle BIWA Data Scientists Certified

For those who attended the BIWA Summit a few weeks ago, you would have seen the data scientist certification. BIWA just listed the first batch of data scientists it certified:

Instructor Level Certificate  - Brendan Tierney

Oracle Data Scientist Certificate 
Don Ferguson, CherryRoad Technologies
Jorge Anicama, IBM (GBS)
Tim Vlamis, Vlamis Software Solutions
Vijayalakshmi Muthukrishnan, Motorola
Sicheng Liu, Deloitte Consulting
Avik Bhattacharya, Printpack Inc.
Ari Kaplan, Ariball
Paul Mitchell, Oracle

Associate Level 
Suresh Anand, Sashatech LLC

Participation Certificate 
Ahmed Kopap
Ekine Akuiyibo
Khader Mohiuddin

More on the program, see here: http://oraclebiwasig.blogspot.com/2013/01/oracle-data-scientist-at-biwa-summit.html


Friday Jan 25, 2013

Announcing: OTN Big Data Developer Day

Announcing the first Big Data Developer Day. A full day with two tracks and hands-on on all things Big Data at Oracle!!

An influx of new data types combined with new approaches for analyzing data are creating untapped growth opportunities that have the potential to transform your business. Oracle is the first vendor to provide a complete and integrated set of enterprise-ready products to address the full spectrum of big data business requirements. Jumpstart your understanding of big data in the enterprise by attending this complementary one-day hands-on workshop. You will learn from technical experts how to:

  • Write MapReduce on Oracle’s Big Data Platform
  • Manage a Big Data environment
  • Access Oracle NoSQL Database
  • Manage Oracle NoSQL DB Cluster
  • Use data from a Hadoop Cluster with Oracle
  • Develop analytics on big data

Register today to learn these skills which you can immediately put to use within your organization.

For more information and to sign up (space is limited!) click the link here.

So if you are in the bay area, do come and learn the coolest new technologies.

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The data warehouse insider is written by the Oracle product management team and sheds lights on all thing data warehousing and big data.

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