Tuesday Mar 25, 2014

Useful Tips on Oracle GoldenGate 12c Installation, Instantiation, and Setup

Written by Nick Wagner, Director of Product Management, Oracle Database High Availability

This is the first of 3 blog posts that I’m writing that will cover some of the questions I get from customers doing a first time implementation of Oracle GoldenGate. I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel, so to speak, so I’m going to reference a number of different My Oracle Support notes that go into more depth about a particular subject or process.

This first post will be about getting the environment set up and installation of Oracle GoldenGate. Also, for simplicity, this will assume a like to like replication environment as well as one-way replication. Future blogs will cover bi-directional replication and environments where the source and target objects have different structures.

Installation

Installation should be done on direct attached storage unless you are installing Oracle GoldenGate in a cluster or for failover, in that case the use of a dedicated NAS or SAN device is fine. Oracle GoldenGate is a quickly evolving product and we have a standard release and patching process. For example, in Oracle GoldenGate 11.2 and 12.1, it’s typically a 3 week patching cycle. So, always use the most recent version of Oracle GoldenGate so you have the most recent stable release. If you are using Oracle GoldenGate 11.2.1, you can just download the most recent release from My Oracle Support. If you are using Oracle GoldenGate 12.1.2, then you should download the installation from OTN or edelivery.oracle.com, and then download and upgrade to the most recent version from My Oracle Support and use Opatch to patch it to the latest release.

Instantiation

There are numerous articles on Oracle GoldenGate instantiation, the two most common are mentioned below.  Essentially, if you can do an Oracle hot backup that’s the easiest way to establish the target database. If that’s not possible, look at Oracle export/import or data pump, and if that can’t be used, you can use GoldenGate's own instantiation. In a situation where you are going to be doing transformation in the Delivery process (Replicat), then GoldenGate's own instantation, while being the slowest, is probably the best choice, as any transformation done in the Delivery can be applied during the initial load as well. It saves you from having to load the data, then transform it.

For like to like, the first is Oracle GoldenGate Best Practices: Instantiation from an Oracle Source Database [Article ID 1276058.1] this document is very comprehensive and covers Oracle to Oracle as well as heterogeneous options. And the other document: Oracle GoldenGate: Initial Load Techniques and References (Doc ID 1311707.1) can be used as well and has a few examples and would be ideal for targets where transformation is going to be used.

Initial Setup

The initial setup of the production database can be quite involved. However, the most important aspect is ensuring that the source database has the correct supplemental logging enabled. In the case where all (or a majority) of the tables are being replicated, it’s easier to configure supplemental logging at the schema level instead of the table level. Using the GGSCI command ADD SCHEMATRANDATA ensures that as the application changes, and new tables are added or keys changed on a table the underlying supplementally logged columns still adhere to those required by Oracle GoldenGate.

If there are tables without primary keys I would recommend that you review this article Supplemental logging – How to Handle Tables Without Primary Keys or Unique Indexes With Oracle GoldenGate [Article ID 1271578.1] that covers the way Oracle GoldenGate handles these types of tables and why it’s important to handle them correctly. If tables without keys aren’t managed properly, you could get anything from poor performance all the way to data corruption. The default way, may not always be the best way of handling these objects. Especially if there is a unique column that just doesn’t have a unique constraint on it.

Another simple way to reduce maintenance on Oracle GoldenGate is wildcarding. For example, if you have  Capture processes (also called Extract) running as a pump and pulling data from a Trail File, and all the data in the Trail File should be sent to the target, then use TABLE *.*; and that will instruct Capture to send all the data that it reads. That way, if a table is added to the Capture reading from the redo logs, you won’t need to make any changes to the Capture running as a pump is necessary. This same concept can even be used in the Delivery, where ASSUMETARGETDEFS is valid. Just use MAP *.*, TARGET *.*; and any table added to the Capture reading from the transaction logs will be sent all the way down to the target.

And that brings the first blog post to a close. I’ll be happy to answer any questions…

About

Learn the latest trends, use cases, product updates, and customer success examples for Oracle's data integration products-- including Oracle Data Integrator, Oracle GoldenGate and Oracle Enterprise Data Quality

Search

Archives
« March 2015
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
    
       
Today