Monday Feb 25, 2013

Connecting Velocity to Value: Introducing Oracle Fast Data

To understand fast data, one must first look at one of the most compelling new the breakthroughs in data management: big data. Big data solutions address the challenge today’s businesses are facing when it comes to managing the increasing volume, velocity, variety of all data - not just data within as well as about the organization. Much of the buzz and to-do around big data has been around Hadoop, NoSQL technologies, but little has been talked about velocity. Velocity is about the speed this data is generating. In many cases the economic value of this data diminishes fast as well. As a result, companies need to process large volumes of data in real-time and make decisions in a more rapid fashion to create value from highly-perishable, high-volumes of data in business operations.

This is where fast data comes in. Fast data solutions help manage the velocity (and scale) of any type of data and any type of event to enable precise action for real-time results.

Fast data solutions come from multiple technologies, and some of the concepts, such as complex event processing and business activity monitoring, have been in use in areas such as the financial services industry for years. But often, the pieces were used in isolation—a complex event process engine as a standalone application to apply predefined business rules to filter data, for example. But when these concepts are tied to analytics, capabilities expand to allow improved real-time insights. By tying together these strands, companies can filter/correlate, move/transform, analyze, and finally act on information from big data sources quickly and efficiently, enabling both real-time analysis and further business intelligence work once the information is stored.

Oracle’s Fast Data solutions offer multiple technologies that work hand-in-hand to create value out of high-velocity, high-volume data. They are designed to optimize the efficiency, scale for processing high volume events and transactions.

[Read More]

Tuesday Oct 02, 2012

Fast Data: Go Big. Go Fast.

For those of you who may have missed it, today’s second full day of Oracle OpenWorld 2012 started with a rumpus. Joe Tucci, from EMC outlined the human face of big data with real examples of how big data is transforming our world. And no not the usual tried-and-true weblog examples, but real stories about taxi cab drivers in Singapore using big data to better optimize their routes as well as folks just trying to get a better hair cut. Next we heard from Thomas Kurian who talked at length about the important platform characteristics of Oracle’s Cloud and more specifically Oracle’s expanded Cloud Services portfolio. Especially interesting to our integration customers are the messaging support for Oracle’s Cloud applications. What this means is that now Oracle’s Cloud applications have a lightweight integration fabric that on-premise applications can communicate to it via REST-APIs using Oracle SOA Suite. It’s an important element to our strategy at Oracle that supports this idea that whether your requirements are for private or public, Oracle has a solution in the Cloud for all of your applications and we give you more deployment choice than any vendor.

If this wasn’t enough to get the juices flowing, later that morning we heard from Hasan Rizvi who outlined in his Fusion Middleware session the four most important enterprise imperatives: Social, Mobile, Cloud, and a brand new one: Fast Data. Today, Rizvi made an important step in the definition of this term to explain that he believes it’s a convergence of four essential technology elements:

  • Event Processing for event filtering, business rules – with Oracle Event Processing
  • Data Transformation and Loading - with Oracle Data Integrator
  • Real-time replication and integration – with Oracle GoldenGate
  • Analytics and data discovery – with Oracle Business Intelligence

Each of these four elements can be considered (and architect-ed) together on a single integrated platform that can help customers integrate any type of data (structured, semi-structured) leveraging new styles of big data technologies (MapReduce, HDFS, Hive, NoSQL) to process more volume and variety of data at a faster velocity with greater results. 

Fast data processing (and especially real-time) has always been our credo at Oracle with each one of these products in Fusion Middleware. For example, Oracle GoldenGate continues to be made even faster with the recent 11g R2 Release of Oracle GoldenGate which gives us some even greater optimization to Oracle Database with Integrated Capture, as well as some new heterogeneity capabilities. With Oracle Data Integrator with Big Data Connectors, we’re seeing much improved performance by running MapReduce transformations natively on Hadoop systems. And with Oracle Event Processing we’re seeing some remarkable performance with customers like NTT Docomo. Check out their upcoming session at Oracle OpenWorld on Wednesday to hear more how this customer is using Event processing and Big Data together.

If you missed any of these sessions and keynotes, not to worry. There's on-demand versions available on the Oracle OpenWorld website. You can also checkout our upcoming webcast where we will outline some of these new breakthroughs in Data Integration technologies for Big Data, Cloud, and Real-time in more details.


Friday Nov 20, 2009

Parallel Processing in ODI

This post assumes that you have some level of familiarity with ODI. The concepts of Packages, Interfaces, Procedures and Scenarios are used here assuming that you understand them in the context of ODI. If you need more details on these elements, please refer to the ODI Tutorial for a quick introduction, or to the complete ODI documentation for detailed information.

ODI: Parallel Processing

A common question in ODI is how to run processes in parallel. When you look at a typical ODI package, all steps are described in a serial fashion and will be executed in sequence.

ParallelPackageSerial.PNG

However, this same package can parallelize and synchronize processes if needed.

PARALLEL PROCESSES

The first piece of the puzzle if you want to parallelize your executions is that a package can invoke other packages once they have been compiled into scenarios (the process of generation of scenarios is described later in this post). You can then have a master package that will orchestrate other scenarios. There is no limit as to how many levels of nesting you will have, as long as your processes are making sense: Your master package invokes a seconday package which, in turn invokes another package...

When you invoke these scenarios, you have two possible execution modes: synchronous and asynchronous.

ParallelScenario.PNG

A synchronous execution will serialize the scenario execution with other steps in the package: ODI executes the scenario, and only after its execution is completed, runs the next step.

An asynchronous execution will only invoke the scenario but will immediately execute the next step in the calling package: the scenario will then run in parallel with the next step. You can use this option to start multiple scenarios concurrently: they will all run in parallel, independently of one another.

SYNCHRONIZING PROCESSES

Once we have started multiple processes in parallel, a common requirement is to synchronize these processes: some steps may run in parallel, but at times we will need all separate threads to be completed before we proceed with a final series of steps. ODI provides a tool for this: OdiWaitForChildSession.

ParallelSynchronize.PNG

An interesting feature is that as you start your different processes in parallel, they can each be assigned a keyword (this is just one of the parameters you can set when you start a scenario). When you synchronize the processes, you can select which processes will be synchronized based on a selection of keywords.

ADDING SCENARIOS TO YOUR PACKAGE FOR PARALLEL PROCESSING

To add a scenario to your package, simply drag and drop the generated scenario in the package, and edit the execution parameters as needed. In particular, remember to set the execution mode to Asynchronous.

You can generate a scenario from a package, from an interface, or from a procedure. The last two will be more atomic (one interface or one procedure only per execution unit). The typical way to generate a scenario is to right-click on one of these objects and to select Generate Scenario.

The generation of scenarios can also be automated with ODI processes that would invoke the ODI tool OdiGenerateAllScen. The parameters of this tool will let you define which scenarios are being generated automatically.

In all cases, scenarios can be found in the object tree, under the object they were generated from - or in the Operator interface, in the Scenarios tab.

While you are developing your different objects, keep in mind that you can Regenerate existing scenarios. This is faster than deleting existing ones only to re-create them with the same version number. To re-generate a scenario, simply right-click on the existing version and select Regenerate ... .

From an execution perspective, you can specify that the scenario you will execute is version -1 (negative one) to ensure that the latest version number is always the one executed. This is a lot easier than editing the parameters with each new release.

DISPLAYING PARALLEL PROCESSING

You will notice that as of 10.1.3.4, ODI does not graphically differentiate between serialized and parallelized executions: all are represented in a serial manner. One way to make parallel executions more visible is stack up the objects vertically, versus the more natural horizontal execution for serialized objects. (If we have electricians reading this, the layout will be very familiar to them, but this is only a coincidence...)

ParallelPackageStackUp.PNG

OTHER OBJECTS THAN SCENARIOS

Scenarios are not the only objects that will allow for parallel (or Asynchronous) execution. If you look at the ODI tool OdiOSCommand, you will notice a Synchronous option that will allow you to define if the external component you are executing will run in parallel with the current process, or if it will be serialized in your process. The same is true for the Data Quality tool OdiDataQuality.

EXECUTION LOGS

As you will start running more processes in parallel, be ready to see more processes being executed concurrently in the Operator interface. If you are only interested in seing the master processes though, the Hierarchy tab will allow you to limit your view to parent processes. Children processes will be listed under the entry Childres Sessions under each session.

Likewise, when you access the logs from the web front end, you can view the Parent processes only.

Enjoy!

Screenshots were taken using version 10.1.3.5 of ODI. Actual icons and graphical representations may vary with other versions of ODI.

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