Wednesday Jan 29, 2014

ODI 12.1.2 Demo on the Oracle BigDataLite Virtual Machine

Oracle's big data team has just announced the Oracle BigDataLite Virtual Machine, a pre-built environment to get you started on an environment reflecting the core software of Oracle's Big Data Appliance 2.4. BigDataLite is a VirtualBox VM that contains a fully configured Cloudera Hadoop distribution CDH 4.5, an Oracle DB 12c, Oracle's Big Data Connectors, Oracle Data Integrator 12.1.2, and other software.

You can use this environment to see ODI 12c in action integrating big data with Oracle DB using ODI's declarative graphical design, efficient EL-T loads, and Knowledge Modules designed to optimize big data integration. 

The sample data contained in BigDataLite represents the fictional Oracle MoviePlex on-line movie streaming company. The ODI sample performs the following two steps:

  • Pre-process application logs within Hadoop: All user activity on the MoviePlex web site is gathered on HDFS in Avro format. ODI is reading these logs through Hive and processes activities by aggregating, filtering, joining and unioning the records in an ODI flow-based mapping. All processing is performed inside Hive map-reduce jobs controlled by ODI, and the resulting data is stored in a staging table within Hive.
  • Loading user activity data from Hadoop into Oracle: The previously pre-processed data is loaded from Hadoop into an Oracle 12c database, where this data can be used as basis for Business Intelligence reports. ODI is using the Oracle Loader for Hadoop (OLH) connector, which executes distributed Map-Reduce processes to load data in parallel from Hadoop into Oracle. ODI is transparently configuring and invoking this connector through the Hive-to-Oracle Knowledge Module.

Both steps are orchestrated and executed through an ODI Package workflow. 

Demo Instructions

Please follow these steps to execute the ODI demo in BigDataLite:

  1. Download and install BigDataLite. Please follow the instructions in the Deployment Guide at the download page
  2. Start the VM and log in as user oracle, password welcome1.
  3. Start the Oracle Database 12c by double-clicking the icon on the desktop.


  4. Start ODI 12.1.2 by clicking the icon on the toolbar.


  5. Press Connect To Repository... on the ODI Studio window. 


  6. Press OK in the ODI Login dialog.


  7. Switch to the Designer tab, open the Projects accordion and expand the projects tree to Movie > First Folder > Mappings. Double-click on the mapping Transform Hive Avro to Hive Staging.


  8. Review the mapping that transforms source Avro data by aggregating, joining, and unioning data within Hive. You can also review the mapping Load Hive Staging to Oracle the same way. 

    (Click image for full size)

  9. In the Projects accordion expand the projects tree to Movie > First Folder > Packages. Double-click on the package Process Movie Data.


  10. The Package workflow for Process Movie Data opens. You can review the package.


  11. Press the Run icon on the toolbar. Press OK for the Run and Information: Session started dialogs. 




  12. You can follow the progress of the load by switching to the Operator tab and expanding All Executions and the upmost Process Movie Data entry. You can refresh the display by pressing the refresh button or setting Auto-Refresh. 


  13. Depending on the environment, the load can take 5-15 minutes. When the load is complete, the execution will show all green checkboxes. You can traverse the operator log and double-click entries to explore statistics and executed commands. 

This demo shows only some of the ODI big data capabilities. You can find more information about ODI's big data capabilities at:


Wednesday Oct 09, 2013

Streaming relational transactions to Hive

Following the introductory blog post on the topic – ' Stream your transactions into Big Data Systems', and blog post on 'Streaming relational transactions to HDFS', in this blog post I will discuss the architecture for streaming relational transactions into Hive.

Referring to the architecture diagram below, integrating database with Hive is accomplished by developing a custom handler using Oracle GoldenGate's Java API and Hadoop HDFS APIs.

The custom handler is deployed as an integral part of the Oracle GoldenGate Pump process. The Pump process and the custom adapter are configured through the Pump parameter file and custom adapter's properties file.The Pump process executes adapter in its address space. The Pump reads the Trail File created by the Oracle GoldenGate Capture process and passes the transactions to the adapter. Based on the configuration, the adapter writes the transactions in a desired format, with the appropriate content to a file which is defined by the Hive DDL for the table.

A sample implementation of the Hive adapter is provided on My Oracle Support (Knowledge ID - 1586188.1). This is provided to illustrate the capability and to assist in the adoption of the Oracle GoldenGate Java API in developing custom solutions. The sample implementation illustrates the configuration and the code required for replicating database transactions on an example table to a corresponding Hive table. The instructions for configuring Oracle GoldenGate, compiling and running the sample implementation are also provided.

The sample code and configuration may be extended to develop custom solutions, however, please note that Oracle will not provide support for the code and the configuration illustrated in the knowledge base paper.

It would be great if you could share your use case about leveraging Oracle GoldenGate in your Big Data strategy and your feedback on using the custom handler for integrating relational database with Hive. Please post your comments in this blog or in the Oracle GoldenGate public forum - https://forums.oracle.com/community/developer/english/business_intelligence/system_management_and_integration/goldengate

Tuesday Jan 15, 2013

ODI - Hive and MongoDB

I've been experimenting with another Hive storage handler, this time for MongoDB, there are a few out there including this one from MongoDB. The one I have been using supports basic primitive types and also supports read and write - using the standard approach of storage handler class and custom properties to describe the data mask. This then lets you access MongoDB via hive external table very easily and abstract away a lot of integration complexity - also makes it ideal for using in ODI. I have been using on my Linux VM where I have Hive running to access my MongoDB running on an another machine. The storage handler is found here, I used it to access the same example I blogged about here, below is the external table definition;

  1. ADD JAR /home/oracle/mongo/hive-mongo.jar;

  2. create external table mongo_emps(EMPNO string, ENAME string, SAL int)  
  3. stored by "org.yong3.hive.mongo.MongoStorageHandler"  
  4. with serdeproperties ( "mongo.column.mapping" = "EMPNO,ENAME,SAL" )  
  5. tblproperties ( "mongo.host" = "<my_mongo_ipaddress>", "mongo.port" = "27017",  
  6. "mongo.db" = "test", "mongo.collection" = "myColl" );

Very simple. The nice aspect of the Hive external table are the SerDeProperties that can be specified, very simple but provides a nice flexible approach. I can then reverse engineer this into ODI (see reverse engineering posting here) and use it in my Hive integration mappings to read and potentially write to MongoDB.

The primitive types supported can also project nested document types, so for example in the document below (taken from here), name, contribs and awards are strings but have JSON structures;

  1. {
  2. "_id" : 1,
  3. "name" : {
  4. "first" : "John",
  5. "last" :"Backus"
  6. },
  7. "birth" : ISODate("1924-12-03T05:00:00Z"),
  8. "death" : ISODate("2007-03-17T04:00:00Z"),
  9. "contribs" : [ "Fortran", "ALGOL", "Backus-Naur Form", "FP" ],
  10. "awards" : [
  11. {
  12. "award" : "W.W. McDowellAward",
  13. "year" : 1967,
  14. "by" : "IEEE Computer Society"
  15. },
  16. {
  17. "award" : "National Medal of Science",
  18. "year" : 1975,
  19. "by" : "National Science Foundation"
  20. },
  21. {
  22. "award" : "Turing Award",
  23. "year" : 1977,
  24. "by" : "ACM"
  25. },
  26. {
  27. "award" : "Draper Prize",
  28. "year" : 1993,
  29. "by" : "National Academy of Engineering"
  30. }
  31. }

can be processed with the following external table definition, which then can be used in ODI;

  1. create external table mongo_bios(name string, birth string, death string, contribs string, awards string)  
  2. stored by "org.yong3.hive.mongo.MongoStorageHandler"  
  3. with serdeproperties ( "mongo.column.mapping" = "name,birth,death,contribs,awards" )  
  4. tblproperties ( "mongo.host" = "<my_ip_address>", "mongo.port" = "27017",  
  5. "mongo.db" = "test", "mongo.collection" = "bios" );

All very simple and that's what makes it so appealing. Anyway, that's a quick following on using external tables with MongoDB and Hive to the SQL oriented approach I described here that used java table functions.

Wednesday Jan 02, 2013

ODI - Hive and NoSQL, the code

This post includes the Java client demonstration code used in the Hive and NoSQL post illustrated here. The BasicBigData.java code is a NoSQL client which populates a key value store that is queryable using the Hive external table from that post. It didn't take long to code and a few peeks at the NoSQL javadoc to get it going. You can take this java code and compile and run it (instructions for compiling are similar to the verification demo here - it is very easy).

The java code uses the NoSQL major/minor path constructor to describe the Key, below is a snippet to define the birthdate for Bob Smith;

  1. ArrayList<String> mjc1 = new ArrayList<String>();
  2. mjc1.add("Smith");
  3. mjc1.add("Bob");
  4. ...
  5. ArrayList<String> mnrb = new ArrayList<String>();
  6. mnrb.add("birthdate");
  7. ...
  8. store.put(Key.createKey(mjc1,mnrb),Value.createValue("05/02/1975".getBytes()));
  9. ...

In the referenced post, to actually aggregate the key values, we used the Hive collect_set aggregation function (see here for Hive aggregation functions). The collect_set aggregation function returns a set of objects with duplicates eliminated. To get the aggregation function behavior in ODI with the correct group by we must tell ODI about the Hive aggregation function. We can define a new language element for collect set in the Topology tree, define the element as a group function, and also define the expression for Hive under the Implementation tab;

We are then able to define expressions which reference this aggregation function and get the exact syntax defined in the earlier post. Below we see the Hive expressions using collect_set below;

From this design and the definition of the aggregation function in ODI, when its executed you can see the generated Hive QL with the correct columns in the grouping function;

The target Hive datastore in the interface I defined as been loaded with the key values from the NoSQL keystore, cool!

Those are a few of the missing pieces which would let you query NoSQL through Hive external tables, hopefully some useful pointers. 

Monday Dec 31, 2012

ODI - Hive and NoSQL

The Hive external table let's us do lots of cool stuff including processing data from NoSQL. We have seen how custom SerDes are used, Hive storage handlers also provide some cool capabilities. Using the Hive storage handler defined here, an external table can be defined to project data from a NoSQL key-value store. The external table can then be used as a source in ODI, very simple.

The illustration on github has the following data stored in a Oracle NoSQL Database (the key is the lastname/firstname etc):

  • /Smith/Bob/-/birthdate: 05/02/1975
  • /Smith/Bob/-/phonenumber: 1111-1111
  • /Smith/Bob/-/userid: 1
  • /Smith/Patricia/-/birthdate: 10/25/1967
  • /Smith/Patricia/-/phonenumber: 2222-2222
  • /Smith/Patricia/-/userid: 2
  • /Wong/Bill/-/birthdate: 03/10/1982
  • /Wong/Bill/-/phonenumber: 3333-3333
  • /Wong/Bill/-/userid: 3

Using the Hive external table and the custom storage handler for a key value store, we define a mask to project the data through the external table. 

  1. ADD JAR /home/oracle/kv/HiveKVStorageHandler.jar;
  2. CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE MY_KV_TABLE (lastname string, firstname string, birthdate string, phonenumber string, userid string)
  3.       STORED BY 'org.vilcek.hive.kv.KVHiveStorageHandler'
  4.       WITH SERDEPROPERTIES ("kv.major.keys.mapping" = "lastname,firstname", "kv.minor.keys.mapping" = "birthdate,phonenumber,userID")
  5.       TBLPROPERTIES ("kv.host.port" = "localhost:5000", "kv.name" = "kvstore");

There are a few interesting properties here;

  • we specify the keyvalue store using TBLPROPERTIES, identify the host/port and the keystore name (kvstore).
  • the SerDe properties contains the mapping of the keys to column names, you will get a row for each value of birthdate, phonenumber, userID

Fairly straightforward. We can then reverse engineer this into ODI, using the same mechanism as I described in previous posts here setting the ODI_HIVE_SESSION_JARS and so forth. The data projected looks like this;

  1. hive> SELECT * FROM MY_KV_TABLE;
  2. OK
  3. Smith     Patricia     10/25/1967     NULL NULL
  4. Smith Patricia NULL 2222-2222     NULL
  5. Smith Patricia NULL NULL 2
  6. Smith Bob 05/02/1975 NULL NULL
  7. Smith Bob NULL 1111-1111 NULL
  8. Smith Bob NULL NULL 1
  9. Wong Bill 03/10/1982 NULL NULL
  10. Wong Bill NULL 3333-3333 NULL
  11. Wong Bill NULL NULL 3

In ODI by defining the Hive collect_set function as an aggregation function, we can then aggregate the data and pivot the data to get it as a row;

  1. SELECT lastname, firstname, collect_set(birthdate)[0], collect_set(phonenumber)[0], collect_set(userid)[0]
  2.       FROM MY_KV_TABLE
  3.       GROUP BY lastname, firstname;

So another interesting illustration of external tables in Hive and what they can provide.

Saturday Dec 29, 2012

ODI - Hive and Complex JSON

Time for a nested JSON example using Hive external tables. ODI treats nested complex types in Hive the same way it treats types in other technologies such as Oracle, the type name is captured, not the definition - you can see XMLType or SDO_GEOMETRY as an example within the ODI Oracle technology. The Hive technology in ODI also has the ARRAY, STRUCT and MAP types seeded. For the nested JSON example I will use the example define in this JSON SerDe page here.

The external table definition is below, I have defined this in Hive and reverse engineered into ODI just like the previous post. Note it is using a different SerDe from the post here, when I tried using that Google SerDe the data was not projected properly (all data was projected as null...so beware of components used). Just like the previous post we need to add the jar whenever it is used (plus don't forget the ODI_HIVE_SESSION_JARS), either from Hive or ODI;

  1. ADD JAR /home/oracle/json/hive-serde-1.0.jar;
  2. CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE message (
  3.   messageid string,
  4.   messagesize int,
  5.   sender string,
  6.   recipients array<string>,
  7.   messageparts array<struct<
  8.     extension: string,
  9.     size: int
  10.   >>,
  11.   headers map<string,string>
  12. )
  13. ROW FORMAT SERDE 'com.proofpoint.hive.serde.JsonSerde'
  14. LOCATION '/user/oracle/json_complex';

This external table has ARRAY fields, STRUCT fields and MAP fields, so we are going above and beyond simple types. The data I will use is the same as the referenced web page;

  1. {
  2.   "messageId": "34dd0d3c-f53b-11e0-ac12-d3e782dff199",
  3.   "messageSize": 12345,
  4.   "sender": "alice@example.com",
  5.   "recipients": ["joe@example.com", "bob@example.com"],
  6.   "messageParts": [
  7.     {
  8.       "extension": "pdf",
  9.       "size": 4567
  10.     },
  11.     {
  12.       "extension": "jpg",
  13.       "size": 9451
  14.     }
  15.   ],
  16.   "headers": {
  17.     "Received-SPF": "pass",
  18.     "X-Broadcast-Id": "9876"
  19.   }
  20. }

Again, I will use the Hive RKM that I mentioned in the post here in order to reverse engineer the external table defined in Hive into ODI. Below you can see the table and how it is represented in ODI. You can see the recipients and messageparts columns are defined as ARRAY, and headers is a MAP.

We can view the data in ODI just like other tables - remember the external table is projected the JSON data from HDFS through Hive;

When the datastore is used in an interface these are the columns that are available in mapping, you can use any of the Hive functions or operators available on these complex types, plus constructors for building them. For example to retrieve the 1st element in the array the following Hive QL can be used;

  • select sender, recipients[0] from message;

 You can build such expressions in ODI;

You just need to be aware of the datatypes you are using and the functions available. Haven't gone into complex SQL/Hive QL here, but you see the basic mechanics are pretty straightforward. One of the points that comes home here is the functionality level of the non-core pieces of Hadoop, so the first 2 JSON SerDe libraries I have used support different capabilities of JSON - so be aware.

ODI - Hive External Tables, reverse engineering

Here we see Hive external tables on JSON data files in action and being reversed engineered from Hive into ODI. Carrying on from my earlier post on Hive reverse engineering here we will tackle external tables with primitive data types. Just like Oracle external tables for accessing data on the filesystem, Hive external tables can access big data files in HDFS. This example uses a JSON SerDe for Hive which was downloaded from here. The external tables in Hive are quite nice! You just specify the HDFS directory and all files in that directory are projected through the external table definition, also you can specify sophisticated SerDe classes that comply with the Hive SerDe interfaces - these classes can reverse engineer complex types also which make them very useful.

Before launching ODI or the agent for this I added the SerDe JAR file to this environment variable used by ODI, here is what I did in my system;

  • export ODI_HIVE_SESSION_JARS=$ODI_HIVE_SESSION_JARS:/home/oracle/json/hive-json-serde-0.2.jar

I have 2 JSON files with data in my HDFS under /user/oracle/json I will specify this directory in the external table definition, along with the JSON SerDe. Within my Hive shell I can define the external table, remembering to add the JSON SerDe file (using the ADD JAR command) just before I create the external table.

  1. ADD JAR /home/oracle/json/hive-json-serde-0.2.jar;
  2. CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE IF NOT EXISTS my_table (
  3.           field1 string, field2 int, field3 string, field4 double
  4.        )
  5.        ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.apache.hadoop.hive.contrib.serde2.JsonSerde'
  6.        LOCATION '/user/oracle/json';

 The data in the first JSON file looks like the following, this was just an example from the google code snippets;

  • {"field1":"data1","field2":100,"field3":"more data1","field4":123.001}
  • {"field1":"data2","field2":200,"field3":"more data2","field4":123.002}
  • {"field1":"data3","field2":300,"field3":"more data3","field4":123.003}
  • {"field1":"data4","field2":400,"field3":"more data4","field4":123.004}

I have defined these fields in the external table. Back in ODI, in my model below I am using the customized reverse with the RKM Hive mentioned above, also for this reverse I just want one table imported, so I defined the mask just to be my_table. Clicking the 'Reverse Engineer' button on the top left of the panel starts the reverse engineering.

If there are errors, then check the ODI Operator, that's where you will see anything that goes wrong. The table in ODI has just some rudimentary information about the number of columns, all of the external table definition for this is defined in Hive, this is the same as when we reverse engineer an Oracle external table. Once the table is captured in ODI I can view the data;

The custom Hive RKM I used is here - this has some changes to the one shipped with ODI to include external table reverse (I included EXTERNAL_TABLE in the getTables API call), plus support for custom SerDe JARs loaded via the environment variable ODI_HIVE_SESSION_JARS (just like the ODI IKMs load the JARs, the RKM also needs to).

Anyway, that's a quick peek at external tables in Hive and reverse engineering them into ODI. Once the table is captured in ODI you can use it in mappings just like other tables!

Friday Dec 28, 2012

ODI - Basic Hive Queries

Here we will see a basic example joining the movie lens data and then loading a Hive table based on the tables from the Reverse Engineering Hive Tables post. The Hive table was defined and created via ODI, I duplicated the movies table and added a column for the rating, just for demo purposes...

When I build my interface, I add movies for my source and movies_info as my target, the auto mapping completes much of the mapping, the rating (which is not mapped below) comes from another table - this is where ODI's incremental design is nice, I can add in a new datastore as a source and map columns from it, then describe the join. 

 After I have added the movie ratings table, I will define the join just by dragging movie_id from movies to the ratings table movie_id column. That's the join...mostly defined.

The other thing you need to check is that the ordered join property is set. This will generate the ordered join (ANSI style, but using the Hive technology's template) syntax.

 We can also perform transformations using built in or user defined functions, below I am performing the Hive built-in UPPER function on the movie name for example.

In the physical, or flow view I am using the Hive Control Append IKM, I am using ODI to create the target table in Hive and also performing a truncate if it exists. Also have the control flow switched off. 

Executing this is just like any other interface apart from we leverage Hive to perform the heavy lifting. The resultant execution can be inspected in the ODI operator or console and the resultant table inspected when complete. 

ODI - Reverse Engineering Hive Tables

ODI can reverse engineer Hive tables via the standard reverse engineer and also an RKM to reverse engineer tables defined in Hive, this makes it very easy to capture table designs in ODI from Hive for integrating. To illustrate I will use the movie lens data set which is a common data set used in Hadoop training.

I have defined 2 tables in Hive for movies and their ratings as below, one file has fields delimited with '|' the other is tab delimited. 

  1. create table movies (movie_id int, movie_name string, release_date string, vid_release_date string,imdb_url string) row format delimited fields terminated by '|';
  2. create table movie_ratings (user_id string, movie_id string, rating float, tmstmp string) row format delimited fields terminated by '\t';

For this example I have loaded the Hive tables manually from my local filesystem (into Hive/HDFS) using the following LOAD DATA Hive commands and the movie lens data set mentioned earlier; 

  1. load data local inpath '/home/oracle/data/u.item' OVERWRITE INTO TABLE movies;
  2. load data local inpath '/home/oracle/data/u.data' OVERWRITE INTO TABLE movie_ratings;

The data set in the file u.item data file looks like the following with '|' delimiter;

  • 1|Toy Story (1995)|01-Jan-1995||http://us.imdb.com/M/title-exact?Toy%20Story%20(1995)|0|0|0|1|1|1|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0
  • 2|GoldenEye (1995)|01-Jan-1995||http://us.imdb.com/M/title-exact?GoldenEye%20(1995)|0|1|1|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|1|0|0
  • 3|Four Rooms (1995)|01-Jan-1995||http://us.imdb.com/M/title-exact?Four%20Rooms%20(1995)|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|1|0|0

In ODI I can define my Hive data server and logical schema, here is the JDBC connection for my Hive database (I just used the default);

I can then define my model and perform a selective reverse using standard ODI functionality, below I am reversing just the movies table and the movie ratings table;

I

After the reverse is complete, the tables will appear in the model in the tree, the data can be inspected just like regular datastores;

From here we see the data in the regular data view;

The ODI RKM for Hive performs logging that is useful in debugging if you hit issues with the reverse engineer. This is a very basic example of how some of the capabilities hang together, ODI can also be used to design the load of the file into Hive, transformations within it and subsequent loads using Oracle Loader for Hadoop into Oracle and on and on.

Wednesday Aug 01, 2012

ODI 11g - Hadoop integration self study

There is a self study available at the link below which is a great introduction to the Hadoop related integration available in ODI 11.1.1.6 (see earlier blog here). Thanks to the curriculum development group for creating this material. You can see from the study how ODI was extended to support integration in and out of the Hadoop ecosystem.

https://apex.oracle.com/pls/apex/f?p=44785:24:0::NO:24:P24_CONTENT_ID,P24_PREV_PAGE:6130,29

The paper here titled 'High Performance Connectors for Load and Access of Data from Hadoop to Oracle  Database' which describes the raw capabilities in the Oracle Loader for Hadoop and Oracle Direct Connector for HDFS is encapsulated in the HDFS File/Hive to Oracle KM, so the different options for loading described in the paper are modeled as capabilities of the Knowledge Module. Another great illustration of the capabilities of KMs.

Much more to come in this space... 

Wednesday Mar 28, 2012

New Feature in ODI 11.1.1.6: ODI for Big Data

By Ananth Tirupattur

Starting with Oracle Data Integrator 11.1.1.6.0, ODI is offering a solution to process Big Data. This post provides an overview of this feature.

Before getting into the details of ODI for Big Data and with all the buzz around Big Data, I will provide a brief introduction to Big Data and Oracle Solution for Big Data.

[Read More]
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