Tuesday Nov 12, 2013

Oracle FLEXCUBE delivers 'Bank-in-a-Box' with Oracle Database Appliance

Another great example of how Oracle Database Appliance simplifies the deployment of high availability database solutions making it easy for Oracle Partners and ISVs to deliver value added solutions to customers on a simple, reliable and affordable database platform.

Oracle FLEXCUBE Universal Banking recently announced that it runs on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 to deliver mid-size banks a compelling banking-in-a-box solution. With this certification, banks can benefit from a low-IT-footprint, high-performance, full-scale banking technology that is engineered to support end-to-end business requirements.

In a recent performance test of Oracle FLEXCUBE Universal Banking on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2, the system managed more than 2.6 million online transactions in 60 minutes. This equated to roughly 744 transactions per second with an average response time of 156 milliseconds for 98 percent of the transactions. Likewise, the solution completed end-of-month batch processing for 10 million customer accounts in 123 minutes during the performance test.

 Learn more about Oracle Database Appliance Solution-in-a-Box.


Tuesday Oct 22, 2013

Top Questions and Answers for Pluging into Oracle Database as a Service

On Monday, October 21st we hosted an online forum that shared a comprehensive path to help your organization design, deploy, and deliver a Database as a Service cloud.

If you missed the online forum, you can watch it on demand by registering here.

We received numerous questions.  Below are highlights of the most informative:

DBaaS requires a lengthy and careful design efforts. What is the minimum requirements of setting up a scaled-down environment and test it out?

You should have an OEM 12c environment for DBaaS administration and then a target database deployment platform that has the key characteristics of what your production environment will look like. This could be a single server or it could be a small pool of hosts if your production DBaaS will be larger and you want to test a more robust / real world configuration with Zones and Pools or DR capabilities for example.

How does this benefit companies having their own data center?

This allows companies to transform their internal IT to a service delivery model for the database. The benefits to the company are significant cost savings, improved business agility and reduced risk. The benefits to the consumers (internal) of services if much fast provisioning, and response to change in business requirements.

From a deployment perspective, is DBaaS's job solely DBA's job?

The best deployment model enables the DBA (or end-user) to control the entire process. All resources required to deploy the service are pre-provisioned, and there are no external dependencies (on network, storage, sysadmins teams). The service is created either via a self-service portal or by the DBA.

The purpose of self service seems to be that the end user does not rely on the DBA. I just need to give him a template. He decides how much AMM he needs. Why shall I set it one by one. That doesn't seem to be the purpose of self service.

Most customers we have worked with define a standardized service catalog, with a few (2 to 5) different classes of service. For each of these classes, there is a pre-defined deployment template, and the user has the ability to select from some pre-defined service sizes. The administrator only has to create this catalog once. Each user then simply selects from the options offered in the catalog. 

Looking at DBaaS service definition, it seems to be no different from a service definition provided by a well defined DBA team. Why do you attribute it to DBaaS?

There are a couple of perspectives. First, some organizations might already be operating with a high level of standardization and a higher level of maturity from an ITIL or Service Management perspective. Their journey to DBaaS could be shorter and their Service Definition will evolve less but they still might need to add capabilities such as Self Service and Metering/Chargeback. Other organizations are still operating in highly siloed environments with little automation and their formal Service Definition (if they have one) will be a lot less mature today. Therefore their future state DBaaS will look a lot different from their current state, as will their Service Definition.

How database as a service impact or help with "Click to Compute" or deploying "Database in cloud infrastructure"

DBaaS enables Click to Compute. Oracle DBaaS can be implemented using three architecture models: Oracle Multitenant 12c, native consolidation using Oracle Database and consolidation using virtualization in infrastructure cloud. As Deploy session showed, you get higher consolidating density and efficiency using Multitenant and higher isolation using infrastructure cloud. Depending upon your business needs, DBaaS can be implemented using any of these models.

How exactly is the DBaaS different from the traditional db? Storage/OS/DB all together to 'transparently' provide service to applications? Will there be across-databases access by application/user.

Some key differences are: 1) The services run on a shared platform. 2) The services can be rapidly provisioned (< 15 minutes). 3) The services are dynamic and can be relocated, grown, shrunk as needed to meet business needs without disruption and rapidly. 4) The user is able to provision the services directly from a standardized service catalog..

With 24x7x365 databases its difficult to find off peak hrs to do basic admin tasks such as gathering stats, running backups, batch jobs. How does pluggable database handle this and different needs/patching downtime of apps databases might be serving?

You can gather stats in Oracle Multitenant the same way you had been in regular databases. Regarding patching/upgrading, Oracle Multitenant makes patch/upgrade very efficient in that you can pre-provision a new version/patched multitenant db in a different ORACLE_HOME and then unplug a PDB from its CDB and plug it into the newer/patched CDB in seconds. 

Thanks for all the great questions!  If you'd like to learn more and missed the online forum, you can watch it on demand here.

Monday Feb 27, 2012

BT Operate Standardizes on Oracle Database 11g for Consolidation onto a Private Cloud

This case study describes how BT Operate, the internal IT and network management division of British Telecommunications plc is consolidating their database infrastructure onto a Database as a Service (DaaS) private cloud using Oracle Database 11g. 

If the complexity of managing thousands of databases that represent a mix of products, versions, operating systems, and hardware is making application deployment in your database environment too slow, operations too expensive, resource utilization too low, and the workload on your IT team too high, you'll gain the insight you'll need about Oracle Database 11g features and options that can help you achieve greater agility and innovation in your cloud environment.

BT Operate can now manage 30% more databases with 20% fewer database administrators while reducing the deployment time for a fully-tested, highly available (HA) database from two to three weeks down to only 19 minutes or a 1000x improvement. 

Read the full story here:

BT Operate Boosts Service Levels and Lowers Management Costs by Standardizing on Oracle Database 11g for Consolidation onto a Private Cloud

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