Friday Jul 11, 2014

Studio 12.4 Beta Refresh, performance counters, and CPI

We've just released the refresh beta for Solaris Studio 12.4 - free download. This release features quite a lot of changes to a number of components. It's worth calling out improvements in the C++11 support and other tools. We've had few comments and posts on the Studio forums, and a bunch of these have resulted in improvements in this refresh.

One of the features that is deserving of greater attention is default hardware counters in the Performance Analyzer.

Default hardware counters

There's a lot of potential hardware counters that you can profile your application on. Some of them are easy to understand, some require a bit more thought, and some are delightfully cryptic (for example, I'm sure that op_stv_wait_sxmiss_ex means something to someone). Consequently most people don't pay them much attention.

On the other hand, some of us get very excited about hardware performance counters, and the information that they can provide. It's good to be able to reveal that we've made some steps along the path of making that information more generally available.

The new feature in the Performance Analyzer is default hardware counters. For most platforms we've selected a set of meaningful performance counters. You get these if you add -h on to the flags passed to collect. For example:

$ collect -h on ./a.out

Using the counters

Typically the counters will gather cycles, instructions, and cache misses - these are relatively easy to understand and often provide very useful information. In particular, given a count of instructions and a count of cycles, it's easy to compute Cycles per Instruction (CPI) or Instructions per Cycle(IPC).

I'm not a great fan of CPI or IPC as absolute measurements - working in the compiler team there are plenty of ways to change these metrics by controlling the I (instructions) when I really care most about the C (cycles). But, the two measurements have a very useful purpose when examining a profile.

A high CPI means lots cycles were spent somewhere, and very few instructions were issued in that time. This means lots of stall, which means that there's some potential for performance gains. So a good rule of thumb for where to focus first is routines that take a lot of time, and have a high CPI.

IPC is useful for a different reason. A processor can issue a maximum number of instructions per cycle. For example, a T4 processor can issue two instructions per cycle. If I see an IPC of 2 for one routine, I know that the code is not stalled, and is limited by instruction count. So when I look at a code with a high IPC I can focus on optimisations that reduce the instruction count.

So both IPC and CPI are meaningful metrics. Reflecting this, the Performance Analyzer will compute the metrics if the hardware counter data is available. Here's an example:


This code was deliberately contrived so that all the routines had ludicrously high CPI. But isn't that cool - I can immediately see what kinds of opportunities might be lurking in the code.

This is not restricted to just the functions view, CPI and/or IPC are presented in every view - so you can look at CPI for each thread, line of source, line of disassembly. Of course, as the counter data gets spread over more "lines" you have less data per line, and consequently more noise. So CPI data at the disassembly level is not likely to be that useful for very short running experiments. But when aggregated, the CPI can often be meaningful even for short experiments.

Friday May 23, 2014

Generic hardware counter events

A while back, Solaris introduced support for PAPI - which is probably as close as we can get to a de-facto standard for performance counter naming. For performance counter geeks like me, this is not quite enough information, I actually want to know the names of the raw counters used. Fortunately this is provided in the generic_events man page:

$ man generic_events
Reformatting page.  Please Wait... done

CPU Performance Counters Library Functions   generic_events(3CPC)

NAME
     generic_events - generic performance counter events

DESCRIPTION
     The Solaris  cpc(3CPC)  subsystem  implements  a  number  of
     predefined, generic performance counter events. Each generic
...
   Intel Pentium Pro/II/III Processor
       Generic Event          Platform Event          Event Mask
     _____________________________________________________________
     PAPI_ca_shr          l2_ifetch                 0xf
     PAPI_ca_cln          bus_tran_rfo              0x0
     PAPI_ca_itv          bus_tran_inval            0x0
     PAPI_tlb_im          itlb_miss                 0x0
     PAPI_btac_m          btb_misses                0x0
     PAPI_hw_int          hw_int_rx                 0x0
...

Monday Oct 19, 2009

Fishing with cputrack

I'm a great fan of the hardware performance counters that you find on most processors. Often you can look at the profile and instantly identify what the issue is. Sometimes though, it is not obvious, and that's where the performance counters can really help out.

I was looking at one such issue last week, the performance of the application was showing some variation, and it wasn't immediately obvious what the issue was. The usual suspects in these cases are:

  • Excessive system time
  • Process migration
  • Memory placement
  • Page size
  • etc.

Unfortunately, none of these seemed to explain the issue. So I hacked together the following script cputrackall which ran the test code under cputrack for all the possible performance counters. Dumped the output into a spreadsheet, and compared the fast and slow runs of the app. This is something of a "fishing trip" script, just gathering as much data as possible in the hope that something leaps out, but sometimes that's exactly what's needed. I regularly get to sit in front of a new chip before the tools like ripc have been ported, and in those situations the easiest thing to do is to look for hardware counter events that might explain the runtime performance. In this particular instance, it helped me to confirm my suspicion that there was a difference in branch misprediction rates that was causing the issue.

Monday Oct 27, 2008

Tutorial on writing a hardware performance counter profiler

This post looks like a very useful tutorial on writing a hardware performance counter profiler. Probably a good read for anyone who fancied writing their own Performance Analyzer.

Friday Feb 08, 2008

libcpc in Solaris 10

libcpcchanged between Solaris 9 and Solaris 10. This is start point for the documentation of the version in Solaris 10, this is the start point for Solaris 9. It's probably also interesting to look at the source for cputrack and cpustat.

About

Darryl Gove is a senior engineer in the Solaris Studio team, working on optimising applications and benchmarks for current and future processors. He is also the author of the books:
Multicore Application Programming
Solaris Application Programming
The Developer's Edge
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