Code complete: coding style

I read Code Complete a couple of years back. It's an interesting book to read, but there were two parts that annoyed me. I was giving a presentation the other week on "Coding for performance" and I happened to mention the book, and say that I had these two reservations. So I figure I should write them up more formally.

My first issue was, basically, me just been a stuck in the mud. Those of you who regularly read my blog will see that I favour the following style of indenting:

  if (some condition)
  {
     do something;
  }

If you've read Solaris Application programming, you'll see that I actually use quite a few styles. In writing that book, there were particular places where there was limited space on the page and I ended up juggling the style to make it fit the medium. So I have preferences, but I'm pragmatic.

Anyway, CC on page 746 says identifies my preferred style as "unindented begin-end pairs" and says the following "Although this approach looks fine, it violates the Fundamental Theorem of Formatting; it doesn't show the logical structure of the code.".

Bother.

So I wanted to read up more details on this Fundamental Theorem, perhaps I'm misreading the text, but this is how it appeared to me (pg 739) "A control construct in Visual Basic always has a beginning statement ... and it always has a corresponding End statement." (pg 740) "The controversy about formatting control blocks arises in part from the fact that some languages don't require block structures." (pg 740) "Uncoupling begin and end from the control structure - as languages like C++ and Java do - with { and } - leads to questions about where to put the begin and end. Consequently, many indentation problems are problems only because you have to compensate for poorly designed language structures." [Emphasis mine.] I read this as, basically, you need to make your untidy C/C++/Java code look more like VB. I guess that's why it's taken me a couple of years to calm down sufficiently to post this ;)

Actually, I'm not far from disagreeing. But let's return to this point in a moment. Let's start with the two approaches to indenting that are recommended in the book.

First of all, what is probably the most common style "pure block emulation":

  if (something) {
    do something;
  }

The other recommended style is "begin and end as block boundaries":

  if (something)
    {
    do something;
    }

On page 745, a study by Hansen and Yim (1987) indicates that there's no difference in understandability between these two styles. Excellent - so it doesn't matter! I'm sure that if "unindented begin-end pairs" were also included in the survey then it too would provide indistinguishable understandability.

Anyway, the differences between the recommended "begin and end as block boundaries" and the shunned "unindented begin-end pairs" is basically four spaces, which I don't personally think is a lot.

Heading back to why I might actually agree with some of his comments. It is very easy to introduce a bug in a program where the begin and end braces have been omitted. For example:

BeforeAfter
  if ( a > max )
    max = a;

  if ( a > max )
    printf("New max = %i\\n",a);
    max = a;

So, whilst I agree that the absence of brackets can be a problem, I don't necessarily think that rigid adherence to a particular style naturally follows as the only solution to that problem.

I do have some rules that I tend to obey:

  • Indenting is a personal/project preference. There are tools out there that can render source code pretty much how you like it. The UI is a view of the source, and it doesn't really matter what the style of the source is. If I find the source hard to read, then I can process it to make it conform to what ever layout works best for me to solve the problem that I'm working on.
  • Always use begin and end brackets. They add a single character and can avoid the problem demonstrated above.
  • I tend to favour clarity over a rigid adherence to particular styles. I'm not above placing an entire statement on a single line when I feel that it is the best way to present the information. Taking the previous example:
    Multi-lineSingle line
      if ( a > max ) {
        max = a;
      }
    
    
      if ( a > max ) { max = a; }
    
    
Comments:

Awhile back I worked with a group that wrote a Coding Standards for Java book. By far the most contentious topic was were the "proper" place was to put the opening brace. We thought we could solve the argument once and for all. After a long debate the group was split exactly 50-50.

Posted by Bill Rushmore on June 10, 2009 at 10:27 PM PDT #

You can never please everyone. I'm convinced that the IDE should display the code in the way _you_ like, and store the code in the way that the _group_ likes - IMO the best of both worlds. Of course that would require some changes to vi.

D.

Posted by Darryl Gove on June 11, 2009 at 03:16 AM PDT #

I guess this is why python avoids braces for blocks alltogether, just to stop this endless discussion...

Posted by fs111 on June 11, 2009 at 08:17 AM PDT #

I find myself much more annoyed by lines like int cmd = 5; int arg=3; int fol=10; int bly=12; than I am by all but the most haphazard mixes of bracketing styles, even in the same file.

Posted by Michael Ernest on June 11, 2009 at 09:16 AM PDT #

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

Darryl Gove is a senior engineer in the Solaris Studio team, working on optimising applications and benchmarks for current and future processors. He is also the author of the books:
Multicore Application Programming
Solaris Application Programming
The Developer's Edge

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
5
6
8
9
10
12
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today
Bookmarks
The Developer's Edge
Solaris Application Programming
Publications
Webcasts
Presentations
OpenSPARC Book
Multicore Application Programming
Docs