Friday Jan 22, 2016

Take Data Wrangling to the Next Level With Big Data Preparation Cloud Service

By Madhu Nair

Even in the most well designed big data projects, a larger portion of the effort and cost is spent in preparing complex data ready for analysis. Big Data Preparation Cloud Service (BDPCS) flips that equation. Minimizing the data preparation time helps unlock the value of complex data quickly. However, data preparation is not just a series of sorting, prepping and standardization operations. When done right, it is a crucial step to enrich data. To unearth insights and prepare a data enrichment pipeline that can then be operationalized to deliver higher quality and vastly insightful data to downstream applications.

Oracle Big Data Preparation Cloud Service is part of the comprehensive Cloud Platform for Big Data that Oracle announced during Open World.

Built for Analysts, Data Scientists and Data Experts

BDPCS utilizes a non technical, web based interface to guide the data preparation effort. This is keeping in view that data preparation should not be dependent on technical skills but business expertise. This brings data science closer to the business experts, data analysts and data scientists. Natural Language Processing based algorithms surfaces recommendations that can be then applied as business and enrichment rules to the data set. These recommendations are presented as "plain english" texts that can then be modified and updated.

Build on Apache Spark, Big Data Preparation Cloud Service also includes a responsive visual element that profiles the data sets for even further analysis and standardizations. Using Big Data Preparation Cloud Service, experts can now pull data, mash them up, enrich the data and publish it quickly. This allows them to iterate through many analysis that generally take weeks or sometime months to co ordinate with the IT and technology teams.

Differentiators

Data preparation and data wrangling is attracting a lot of investment as Data Science enters the next stage of refinement. Big Data Preparation Cloud Service brings certain critical elements that put it ahead of its competition.

It brings recommendation driven user experience

It utilizes Natural Language Processing classifications and enrichment, and

It has extensive automation capabilities.

We invite you attend our upcoming webcast to hear from Oracle executives and partner Blue Cloud Innovations and learn more about Oracle Big Data Preparation Cloud Service.  

Take Data Wrangling to the Next Level with Oracle Big Data Preparation Cloud Service

Tuesday, January 26 9:30am PT/ 12:30pm ET

Join us next Tuesday to bring analytics and data science closer to everyone within your organization through easier data preparation.

Tuesday Dec 22, 2015

Being First to Market is no Longer Enough

Written by Shawn Price, Senior Vice President for Oracle Cloud and Product Business Groups, at Oracle @ShawnPrice1000  

Being first to market has for some time now been synonymous with success, and not without reason. From Ford to Nintendo, companies have found an advantage in being the first to launch new and exciting products. But is this still the case? Does the so-called ‘first-mover advantage’ really mean as much as it used to? 

If you listen to Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn, the answer to these questions is a resounding ‘no’, at least when looking at the case of Silicon Valley businesses. For Hoffman, the ability to rapidly scale a digital product or service once it has a customer base is much more important than being first. For evidence, he gives the example of Facebook, which successfully grew its businesses to a breath-taking size in just six years. 

Digital innovation

Hoffman’s view is entirely correct, but it can be taken further. To a greater or lesser extent, all businesses today are ‘Silicon Valley’ businesses in so far as technology lies at the heart of what they do. After all, digital and mobile applications are every bit as important to, for example, a fashion retailer or restaurant as they are to digital service providers such as LinkedIn. 

In the case of the fashion business they can be used to improve everything from logistics and supply chain management to enhancing customer service, while for many restaurants digital applications are transforming how customers place their orders and the way kitchens meet these orders. Whatever the sector, it is easy to imagine ways the customer experience can be improved by enhanced web and mobile applications.   

Continual innovation

Business – and public sector organisations too – must therefore place digital innovation at the heart of everything they do in a way that allows them to continually grow and build further on their innovations. In fact, businesses serious about competing and winning market share need to embrace a philosophy of continual innovation. They must ensure that they never rest on their laurels. This means they should proactively look at how they can improve existing product lines and business models, launch entirely new ones, and be sure they can scale both with ease. 

This all makes good sense from a business perspective, but it also begs a key question: how can businesses embed continual innovation within their organizations without incurring high costs? And how can they physically build, test and launch new applications and features at the pace demanded by modern business? Indeed, how can businesses afford to risk all on innovations that may or may not work? 

Businesses need a way to reduce the time, cost and complexity that has traditionally characterised application development. They need to be able to risk failure on applications without that failure coming at too punitive a price. In a way, application development needs to be taken down from its pedestal and integrated into all parts of the business as a day-to-day task, where business units themselves can take on some of the development functions that have traditionally been the preserve of the IT team. 

Enabling continual innovation

Until recently such an environment was largely the stuff of dreams, but the rapid rise of cloud computing has meant that these dreams can now be realised. In fact, the ideal of continual innovation is today within reach of all businesses.  

One cloud platform – Platform as a Service (PaaS) – is particularly important in this respect. PaaS brings the qualities that have made cloud computing so compelling for business application provision to the world of application development; namely ease of use, price flexibility and scalability.  

Ease of use is important because it reduces the time it takes to develop applications. All the resources and toolsets needed for a development environment can be taken as a service, which means they can be delivered to the business almost immediately through the cloud. In the past, such resources and toolsets would need to be procured, set up and project managed by the IT department, a process that could take many months depending on what else the IT department had on its to do list.  

Cost is also important. When provisioning bespoke development environments for each application, as is the case in traditional on-premise set ups, the costs can quickly add up. Consequently, few businesses are willing to invest in the storage, infrastructure and database resources needed for application development, unless the business case is iron clad. Not only does this hinder innovation, but it also impedes the ability to scale.  

Faster innovation at scale

With PaaS, however, businesses can take whatever resources they need for any given stage of development. If a business wants to rapidly evaluate an application it can do so in the cloud, using pre-existing toolsets to build the application and test it using virtualised cloud resources. If successful, the business can then easily scale up, either by buying more capacity from cloud providers or moving the application to their on-premise or private cloud resources if preferred. 

Indeed, this is perhaps the most significant capability of PaaS solutions: to act as a bridge between public and private clouds and on-premise systems. We are facing what will be a decade of coexistence between cloud and on-premise computing. Crucially, the right PaaS solutions are compatible with both and therefore can act as glue, binding on-premise and cloud solutions in hybrid cloud infrastructures with a single unified view. 

PaaS, therefore, not only allows businesses to innovate, but ensures they can stay relevant by continually building on their ideas and winning over new customers in the process. It also means that if businesses hit on a winning web or mobile application they are able to scale it rapidly and make the most of the business opportunity. This ensures that regardless of whether they are first to market or last, if they have a service that customers want to use, they are able to build on it rapidly and fuel growth for the business.  
To find out more about how PaaS can enable scalable innovation, please download our report into the subject: The Oracle Cloud Agility Study.


Wednesday Dec 16, 2015

Think Application Development is a Risky Business? Well Think Again

Written by Shawn Price, Senior Vice President for Oracle Cloud and Product Business Groups, at Oracle @ShawnPrice1000 

Risk has always been, and will continue to be, an integral part of doing business. After all, it is only by taking risks that the greatest wins are made. But the nature of risk is changing. In the past, the pace of innovation and change was much slower than it is today. Major innovations in technology and business models would take months, if not years, to spread. This meant that cautious businesses could take a ‘wait-and-see’ approach and only adopt new business tools and approaches to working once they had passed the test of time. On the other hand, adventurous businesses could risk all by adopting early. They gained much if the risk paid off, but when it didn’t these businesses stood to lose everything. 

Today, this model has been turned on its head. New services and even whole new companies are being launched every week, and what is revolutionary one month is passé the next. In our fast-moving digital world, the biggest risk for companies is doing nothing and watching their customers and market share flow to more agile competitors. It is surprising, therefore, that in a recent Oracle study of global enterprises, 33 percent of respondents state that their companies are risk averse when it comes to developing innovative business applications. With a further 24 percent of stating that they do not know just how risk averse their companies are, the real figure could be much higher.

Risk aversion and application development

These findings are concerning: in a world which favours the quickest and most inventive, many businesses are opting for a cautious approach towards what is a key mechanism for innovation – application development. When looking at the causes of risk aversion in this context, the study showed a variety of factors are at play. Chief amongst these are fears that the cost and time associated with application development is simply too high to risk failure, and a belief within businesses that they don’t have access to the right data insights to create innovative applications. Institutional risk aversion was also cited by a significant proportion of respondents.  

These are, in all fairness, perfectly good reasons to be risk averse. However, businesses today need to weigh up the risks associated with application development against the greater risk of failing to innovate. The modern business world is built on and fuelled by digital technology, both in terms of customer services and internal operations. Just as web and mobile applications are revolutionising how companies interact with and sell to customers, so too are they enhancing productivity and driving unheralded levels of efficiency through improved working practices. Companies that can continually innovate, enhance and scale these applications will become leaders in their fields. 

The good news is that technology is increasingly able to make application development a far less risky, costly and time-consuming process. In many cases, test and development environments are required for each new application instance, which may mean buying new infrastructure and software resources. Additionally, the technology involved can be complex and needs IT to project manage the development process. Given the already busy schedules of IT departments, such projects can be delayed further and it can take several months or longer for a new application to be designed and tested.

What if, after all that time and money, it turns out that the application does not meet expectations? In the light of this concern, it is easy to see why some businesses are risk averse.

Enabling low-risk innovation

The good news is that this no longer need be the case. Businesses have for some years now enjoyed the flexibility cloud computing has brought to ‘off-the-shelf’ applications. Software as a Service (SaaS) has created a whole new era in computing, enabling businesses to pay only for what they actually use, while accessing the latest versions of applications on the market each and every time. Many of the characteristics that made SaaS such a success are now promising to transform the way business applications are developed and extended internally within organisations. As such, Platform as a Service (PaaS) promises to reduce the risks associated with application development and thereby help enable further rapid innovation and change. 

With PaaS, businesses can get the resources and infrastructure they need for application development instantly as a service. This not only means the cost is moved from capital to operational expenditure, it also means that businesses can get the resources they need much more quickly, and that these resources will always be the best available at any given time. Moreover, cloud ‘hides’ much of the complexity involved, providing simple user interfaces that most people can use with minimal input from IT. As a result, the business department requiring the application can also lead on its development. 

Importantly, PaaS further helps businesses by smoothing the migration from on-premise to cloud systems. Over the next decade, , businesses’ on-premise systems will coexist with cloud systems, and applications will be developed and used in both environments. PaaS will be important as it optimises this coexistence. The best PaaS solutions let customers view cloud and on-premise as a single unified system., allowing businesses to get the most from their existing on-premise investments while losing none of the agility benefits on offer in the cloud. As such, PaaS is a great tool for managing risk.  

PaaS is therefore an enabler of the digital business; providing the means of testing applications and businesses models rapidly and at a dramatically lower cost, evaluating their worth and then either discarding them or implementing them. It provides cloud test environments that allow even the most cautious of businesses to start with small and targeted developments and thereby greatly reduce risk. It means businesses can innovate more, while worrying less. 


Friday Dec 04, 2015

Now Launching Oracle Sites Cloud Service

Originally posted on the Oracle WebCenter blog

We are excited to announce Oracle Sites Cloud Service. Oracle Sites Cloud Service drives digital engagement for employees, customers and partners through intuitive assembly of content, applications, and processes to build rich community and marketing sites.

Engagement.
Rapidly assemble rich digital experiences for marketing sites, communities, and other business needs using themes, components, and applications.

Collaboration.
Collaborate with internal and external teams in creating content, building sites, and coordinating site updates.

Governance.
View, manage, and administer all of your community and marketing microsites in one console.

Extensibility.
Integrate third-party applications and create new custom themes to meet specific business needs.

Ready to Learn More on Oracle Sites Cloud Service?

          · [White Paper] The Linchpin of Your Digital Engagement Platform (link)
   · [Datasheet] Digital Engagement Sites in the Cloud (link)
   · [Infographic] Empowering the Business to Deliver Sites and Communities (link)
   · [eBook] Rapidly Develop Engagement Sites in the Cloud (link
   · [Video] Introducing Oracle Sites Cloud Service (link)
   · [Website] Oracle Sites Cloud Service Website (link)

          Oracle Sites Cloud Service is available as an option under Oracle Documents Cloud Service. Limited use is included at no-charge with Oracle Documents Cloud Service. To get started, visit us at cloud.oracle.com/cloud-sites

Wednesday Dec 02, 2015

Oracle Data Visualization Cloud Service is Now Available

At this year's Oracle OpenWorld, there was no shortage of new product announcements and updates. If you've been around Oracle long enough, it's something you just get accustomed to when it comes to Oracle's annual flagship conference. Sometimes it feels like you're drinking from a firehose! So with all of the activity and news that surrounds OpenWorld, it's not hard for any news item to get lost in the mix.

That's why in the post-OpenWorld calm, I like to revisit some of the key new product offerings that are worth learning more about. In this case, I'd like to draw your attention to the Oracle Data Visualization Cloud Service (DVCS) which we announced at OpenWorld and is now Generally Available (GA).

Oracle DVCS is a new Oracle Cloud PaaS offering that provides rich, consumer-style analytics, including intelligent data visualization, and self-service data discovery. It also provides mobile consumption and authoring capabilities. In just a few clicks, DVCS users can combine and visually analyze data from disparate data sources, and quickly reveal and share hidden patterns and actionable insights.  As a cloud service, DVCS provides these capabilities without heavy lifting by IT resources or upfront capital investment, resulting in faster time to value and greater ROI.


To get the full scoop on Oracle Data Visualization Cloud Service, check out Jernej Kaše's post on the Fusion Middleware Blog. And for more info about DVCS and other Oracle BI cloud services, visit Oracle Cloud Platform for Business Analytics.

Tuesday Oct 27, 2015

More PaaS News from OpenWorld '15

Every year at Oracle OpenWorld, there are a number of announcements made about new products and services. This year has been no different. If you saw Larry Ellison's keynote on Sunday, you heard Larry announce several exciting new cloud offerings which were summarized in this blog.

Fast forward to today and there's additional announcements being made about Oracle Cloud's platform and infrastructure services that further show Oracle's innovation and leadership in the cloud. Here is a list of the press release announcements made today:

Monday Oct 26, 2015

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 kicks off with major announcements in Larry Ellison keynote

Officially kicking off Oracle OpenWorld 2015, the keynote of Larry Ellison on Sunday evening was packed with annoucements.

In his analysis of the Cloud market of the last 16 years, he made it very clear that we're in the middle of a cloud transformation of each of the 3 layers of the cloud, SaaS, PaaS and IaaS. He then introduced the 6 design goals of the Oracle Cloud:

  • Cost
  • Reliability
  • Performance
  • Standards
  • Compatibility
  • Security

and elaborated extensively on each of those design goals.

For your convenience, we've storified all of the relevant tweets that were sent during his one hour presentation. As you can read in the Storify, he announced many new services and improvements:

For SaaS:

For PaaS

 Can you spot all of them? We will cover all of these new services in due time in more detail.

The video with highlights of the keynote can be found here

Monday Sep 28, 2015

The Wait is Over: SOA Cloud Service and API Manager Cloud Service are Here

Today we announced the availability of Oracle SOA Cloud Service and API Manager Cloud Service with a press release. These services are part of Oracle Cloud Platform for Integration and complement Oracle Integration Cloud Service to provide a complete and robust integration platform-as-a-service (iPaaS) in the cloud.

Oracle SOA Cloud Service is a comprehensive suite of integration services that enable users to quickly integrate on-premises and cloud applications with capabilities including enterprise service bus and orchestration; while B2B, Managed File Transfer, business activity monitoring, scheduling service and event processing features are coming soon.   Oracle API Manager Cloud Service enables developers to create new custom APIs and expose them to internal or external consumers in a secure way to help develop innovative offerings for end users. 

The new cloud services target developers’ diverse requirements and accelerate innovation with features such as:
  • Rapid provisioning for SOA 12c, Service Bus 12c, or API Manager 12c environments, based on the size and requirements specified by the customer. A new environment can be created in a matter of minutes, instead of taking weeks or even months to be ready on premises.
  • Simplified management with single click patching, single click scale out, built-in backup/recovery
  • Access to comprehensive capabilities of SOA 12c and deployment portability to support hybrid integration


Hybrid integration is a popular approach to integration projects as it gives customers the flexibility to deploy their projects where it makes sense to run them at the time, without being locked into that environment going forward. Ovum’s senior analyst for middleware Saurabh Sharma says “With 88 percent of respondents to a recent Ovum survey showing inclination to adopt cloud-based integration platforms for appropriate use cases, it is clear that enterprises realize the need for an agile approach to hybrid integration. Digitalization and the need for greater agility at a lower cost of ownership are driving adoption of hybrid integration solutions with an ‘SOA and iPaaS’ combination being a preferred option. Enterprises should plan to distribute integration processes in a way that ensures efficient utilization of both on-premise and cloud-based integration infrastructure and operational spend.  Oracle’s unified iPaaS portfolio, which includes Oracle Integration Cloud Service and Oracle SOA Cloud Service, combined with its on-premises SOA Suite, enables users to ease the complexity of hybrid integration.”

Oracle Integration Cloud Service customer Calix also shares our excitement. Ravi Gade, senior director, IT Applications at Calix says: “Oracle’s iPaaS portfolio, which now includes Oracle SOA Cloud Service and Oracle API Manager Cloud Service, meets various integration requirements and supports multiple use cases that today’s competitive digital businesses need. It empowers integration developers to focus on enabling strategic initiatives by simplifying administration and configuration of the integration platform.”

You can learn more about Oracle SOA Cloud and Oracle API Manager Cloud services by visiting our Web site http://cloud.oracle.com/SOA and reading additional blog posts.

Monday Jun 29, 2015

Oracle Cloud Platform Launch Wrap-Up

Last Monday, Oracle held a live event at its headquarters in Redwood Shores, announcing the addition of 24 new platform and infrastructure services to the Oracle Cloud. The launch event was headlined by none other than Oracle’s Executive Chairman and CTO, Larry Ellison. I was lucky enough to attend in person and thought I’d share some of the highlights of the day.

The day got off to an early start with a full lineup of executive interviews conducted by SiliconANGLE’s John Furrier and streamed live from theCube. Interviewees included a number of Oracle executives, Oracle Cloud Platform customers, and IDC analyst Carl Olofson. I thought the interviews were insightful and I really like John’s conversational interview style.  If you’re interested in hearing different industry perspectives on PaaS, it’s worth checking out the replays of the interviews here.

The live in-person portion of the event went off in front of a packed house in Oracle’s Conference Center. The room was filled with hundreds of customers, partners, and members of the press and analyst communities. For those who weren’t able to attend in person, the entire event was streamed live to a global audience of thousands.  Larry’s presentation provided a quick recap of Oracle’s SaaS business as well as a high-level view of the 24 new platform and infrastructure services being added to Oracle Cloud. Following Larry was Thomas Kurian, President of Product Development, Oracle, who drilled down into more detail on the new services and included some very cool demos of the new Dedicated Compute, Exadata, and Mobile cloud services.  Lastly, Steve Daheb, SVP of PaaS, BI, and EPM Business Groups, hosted a panel discussion with key executives from Avaya, JDSU, Accenture, and Pharmavite who talked about how Oracle Cloud Platform is helping them drive business innovation and technology leadership. The entire event was recorded and each segment is now available to view on-demand. If you don’t have time to watch a replay of the entire event, you can watch this short highlight video of Larry’s keynote.

My key takeaway from Monday’s launch was that Oracle continues to be all-in with respect to the cloud. Oracle is expanding its already broad and integrated cloud platform and has plugged the few remaining gaps with services like Mobile, Integration, and Process. Now, Oracle is starting to differentiate itself by raising the bar with platform services based on engineered systems like Oracle Exadata and Big Data Appliance to enable performance, scale, and reliability never seen before in a public cloud. It’s ambitious and impressive, and based on initial reactions from customers, press, and analysts, it's going to significantly increase the possibilities of PaaS in the enterprise.

For a more comprehensive rundown of Monday’s announcements, check out the press release.  And of course, for more information about the Oracle Cloud Platform itself, just go to http://oracle.com/paas.  

Lastly, if you want to learn more about Oracle Cloud Platform, I encourage you to register for the upcoming live Oracle Cloud Platform webcast series which starts in July.

Monday Mar 30, 2015

What is PaaS? And Why Should HR Care?

By Mike Vilimek

wow

Oracle recently announced the availability of a new type of Cloud offering called PaaS. It stands for Platform-as-a-Service, and allows customers to develop, run and manage web applications without the complexity of building and maintaining the infrastructure typically associated with developing and launching an app. Sounds very “techy”. Why should HR care about PaaS?

[Read More]

Thursday Mar 26, 2015

Your Journey to the Oracle Cloud

You can’t rush your journey to the cloud. It takes up front planning and analysis to determine your first steps toward a cloud environment. But with the right management tools and best practices in place, it can be a much faster, simpler, and more rewarding process than you might envision. Some initial steps to consider for your transition to cloud:

  1. A first step would be to consolidate, standardize and automate your existing on-premises IT environment. This lays a foundation for migration over time to the cloud. You don’t want to move from a heavily distributed, non-standardized environment and then just move that into the cloud. That just takes you from essentially existing physical “sprawl” to virtual “sprawl”. Standardizing and consolidating is a key first step to avoid propagation of these complexities into a cloud environment.
  2. Next, implement a private cloud, to leverage immediate benefits in increased agility while retaining control of your environment.  More and more companies are implementing a private cloud with self-service access, automation, elastic scaling, and so forth, to achieve the benefits of cloud on-premises.
  3. Explore Oracle’s extensive public cloud services, from cloud applications, to PaaS, to IaaS.  Educate yourself about the offerings with the multitude of white papers, webcasts, demos, and videos available.  This will help you in your planning and strategizing on which project to implement in Oracle Cloud first.
  4. Look at the management capabilities included with the Oracle Cloud services.  A key aspect is the use of Oracle Enterprise Manager, which allows you to manage your on-premises or private cloud, as well as your services running in Oracle Cloud.
  5. Start with your simplest use cases, and move those first, such as development and test.  Development and test environments are ideal as they typically have no data dependency or security considerations, as you are using strictly test data. 

For further information on moving to cloud, you can start here

Friday Feb 06, 2015

Personalized Technology: The New Frontier in Cloud Computing

written by Lisa M. Schwartz @leeza2020

As it is with medicine and learning institutions, we often rely on traditional ways of treating people in large groups so that positive effects can be achieved quickly for the masses. Yet, today, consumers want more. They are asking for the next level in personalization: How can medicines and treatments be tailored so that they work best for “ME”? Or, how does a tailored training course help “ME” to learn faster?

In medicine, a growing number of researchers, healthcare clinicians, and an increasing number of patients are calling for a more personalized approach aimed at preventing disease and tailoring treatment if a disease becomes a reality - often referred to as personalized medicine, genomic medicine or precision medicine.

Even educational institutions use the phrase, “personalized learning”, to refer to tailoring lessons to different students. They point to the myriad of digital devices, software, and learning platforms offering educators an array of options for tailoring lessons to students' preferences.

The Advent of Personalized Cloud Technology Software

And so it goes, in the cloud computing software world.

How can software be personalized in the cloud to work better for “ME”, the individual?

As consumers, most of us don’t mind having recommendations made to us based upon our last purchases, especially if they are relevant and timely to our interests. And similarly, as employees using business software, we want to be able to tailor software, even have insights and recommendations made to us, so we can be more empowered and effective in in our day to day tasks.

And today this phenomenon is only accelerating. Gen Y or Millennials are the largest generation now in the workforce since the baby boomers. Millennials, have taken the lead in seizing all the new platforms of the digital era—the internet, mobile technology, social media—to construct personalized networks. They are “digital natives”—the only generation for which these new technologies are not something they’ve had to adopt. Personalization is something they have come to expect. (1)

Not only Millennials, but most digital users today want to know more, quickly and easily. There is an expectation that business software will allow us to personalize, enabling us get better results for the company and ultimately help us to excel in our positions.

“Treat Everyone the Same” 1St Gen Cloud Apps Providers

Yet, not all cloud software gives the user the flexible personalization they need, due to a “one size fits all software design in the cloud” built by the majority of SaaS software providers. This “one size fits all” design enables the software provider to manage and upgrade all their customers at one time, treating them as a large group. This 1st generation “treat everyone the same design” decreases the provider’s costs. Not only is this practice prevalent in the cloud but is a predominant practice in medical and educational institutions. The result of this “treat everyone the same” is: limited personalization, limited options and limited benefits for the consumer.

Distinctions of Modern 2nd Generation Cloud Apps Providers

However not all cloud providers use this approach in cloud application design. 2nd generation cloud application providers understand that personalization for each customer and each individual is now a requirement. Modern cloud application providers are taking a personalized approach to cloud design and understand that each customer is unique, has unique business processes, has unique data requirements and that all customers do not fit nicely into one group. 2nd generation cloud application providers offer customers’ choice and personalization in cloud software for their business.

Personalizing Beyond the SaaS Application with PaaS

Not only does personalization include the capabilities to make choices within the application but also includes a complete breadth of services available to you if you want to extend beyond your SaaS application with Platform as a Service (PaaS). Perhaps you want create a new application or mashup information into your SaaS application from external data sources. When choosing a cloud applications provider, it is equally important to look very closely at the standards based capabilities within their cloud PaaS platform.


Things to Look for in a Modern Cloud Platform Provider

· Provides a well-known standards based cloud platform to maintain consistent governance and standards across the business

· Allows you to personalize and extend your SaaS cloud applications quickly

· No lock-in with unknown proprietary languages or databases

· Maintains a secure cloud platform that connects easily with SaaS applications and other clouds

· Allows you to move your applications if you choose to another platform

· Provides pre-built services at every layer that will help your business innovate and personalize beyond the SaaS application.

     As we enter into the next frontier of personalized cloud technology, be sure to examine closely the nuances of cloud providers and how  they allow you to personalize your cloud. In this 2nd generation of cloud applications and cloud platforms, it is not an unreasonable for you to expect more choice and personalization in the cloud.

 For find out more about Personalizing SaaS applications and modern standards based cloud platform services, PaaS, watch and share this fun and fact filled video.

          1.  (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chris-komisarjevsky/millennials-are-defining-_b_5714683.html)

Tuesday Feb 03, 2015

Five best practices for PaaS [Platform as a Service]

In the Fall of 2014, ComputerWorld published a report detailing the results from a survey conducted with 300 IT executives and practitioners worldwide. The questions ranged from type of applications being run on the cloud now and in the future, support for mission-critical apps, the challenges faced from an interoperability perspective, and more. The results highlighted some critical insights from these experts which for certain topics were surprisingly significantly aligned. Calling this phenomena [this alignment] the wisdom of the crowd, we bet that as the industry moves forward with the cloud initiative, IT leaders worldwide are increasingly adopting these practices, driving these to become best practices. Hence our attempt at culling these and putting these within an infographic, so its easily available at a birds eye view level to IT practitioners undertaking their cloud journey right now.

For further details, refer to the the ComputerWorld Survey report here.

Friday Jan 16, 2015

Is Your PaaS Delivering the Agility Your Users Demand?

Jan. 28, 2015, Cloud Platform Online Forum

Join Oracle at the keynote as we kick off the online forum with IDC analyst Robert Mahowald. Learn how to rapidly build, deploy, manage, and secure rich applications and enable business collaboration and innovation using an integrated cloud platform built on the industry’s #1 Database and Application Server.

Following the keynote, stay for highly engaging content specifically designed for:

  • Java and Database developers
  • Database managers and administrators
  • IT operations managers
  • Lines of business managers

Review the full agenda for more information. Experts will be available for online chat to answer your technical questions.

Thursday Jan 15, 2015

New Enterprise Manager Release Delivers Adaptive Private PaaS

We are pleased to announce an update to Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c Release 4. The update is now available for download on Oracle Technology Network.  

So what exactly is adaptive private PaaS?

Recent releases of Enterprise Manager have expanded capabilities around Platform as a Service (PaaS) delivery in your private cloud. In particular, the EM Cloud Management Packs have focused on two critical areas for Oracle customers: Database as a Service (DBaaS) and Middleware as a Service (MWaaS).

In this release, these PaaS capabilities have become more adaptive to complex, rapidly growing environments. The detailed blog post on the Enterprise Manager blog looks at 3 areas where database and middleware users and managers will benefit.

Read more here.

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