Introducing the Free Java License

September 15, 2021 | 2 minute read
Donald Smith
Vice President of Product Management
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In September 2017, Oracle announced plans to distribute the JDK under the GPL as “Oracle OpenJDK” and also as the Oracle JDK under an Oracle Technology Network (OTN) license.  Providing Oracle OpenJDK builds under the GPL was highly welcomed, but feedback from developers, academia and enterprises was that they wanted the trusted, rock-solid Oracle JDK under an unambiguously free terms license, too.  Oracle appreciates the feedback from the developer ecosystem and are pleased to announce that as of Java 17 we are delivering on exactly that request.

Oracle will provide Oracle JDK LTS releases under the NFTC for at least one full year after the subsequent LTS version, giving you more flexibility on your upgrade schedules. You can still follow the six monthly JDK release cadence to benefit from faster access to new features, performance improvements and other enhancements, of course, but you now also have the time necessary to migrate from one Oracle JDK LTS to the next, if that’s the model that you prefer.

For more information about Oracle JDK Licensing, see the Oracle Java SE Licensing FAQ.

The Oracle Java SE Subscription continues to provide value-added features such as the Java Management Service, Advanced Management Console and GraalVM Enterprise at no incremental cost.  Coupled with 24x7 support (from the very developers at Oracle who develop source code for most of the Java platform used globally) and the low cost of just $25 (USD)/month/processor or $2.50(USD)/user/month, the Oracle Java SE Subscription remains a high value choice favored by thousands of organizations small and large alike.

Donald Smith

Vice President of Product Management


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