Five must-know facts about approved senders in OCI Email Delivery

June 28, 2021 | 2 minute read
Josh Nason
Senior Email Delivery Consultant
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If you were taking a class in Email 101, the first thing that you would learn is that you can’t send an email without a recipient and you can’t send an email unless you have an email address to send from.

With OCI Email Delivery, that email address you send from is called an approved sender: An email address that’s approved to send from your tenancy and region.

Approved senders can utilize their primary corporate domain, a subdomain or both. Brands typically use multiple approved senders based on their different streams of email, such as bulk and marketing, transactional, cart abandonment, and re-engagement. These streams all make for a sound domain strategy.

Setting up approved senders in OCI Email Delivery

  • You can’t use Oracle.com or free mailbox providers, such as Gmail or Hotmail, as approved senders. The sender must be a domain or subdomain that you can add email authentication to, like SPF and DKIM.

  • Approved senders are region-specific but can be used in multiple regions. For example, if josh@example.com is set up in US West (Phoenix), it must also be set up in US East (Ashburn) if you want to send through that region.

  • User permission policies are required to both manage and use approved senders.

  • OCI Email Delivery supports tags for approved senders, which can better help you organize them.

  • Free Tier OCI customers can have up to 2,000 approved senders, while enterprise users can have up to 10,000.

When you read that last bullet, you might wonder why any sender would need that many addresses to send from. Companies that provide email services to other companies, such as a CRM tool or a specialty service, having that flexibility can come in handy.

If you’re not an Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Email Delivery customer, you can begin your journey today.

Josh Nason

Senior Email Delivery Consultant

An email marketing veteran of more than a decade, Josh came to Oracle through the acquisition of Dyn. He currently works on both the Dyn and OCI Email Delivery teams, both assisting customers with email delivery issues and helping keep the network clean.


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