Data Backup and Recovery for MySQL - a MySQL Time Machine is Born.

Sure, you've heard it before: [some company's logo] has a new MySQL backup tool that promises to solve all of your data recovery needs. The good news is most of these tools work pretty well. However, they tend to suffer from a similar set of limitations. Most require sophisticated infrastructures or complex setup and maintenance and can become a resource drain for some organizations. You're probably wondering, "Why can't someone build a fully automated MySQL backup solution that you can just turn on and forget?"

I am happy to say that the MySQL Developers at Sun are doing just that. In fact, a prototype will be demonstrated at the 2009 MySQL Users' Conference that will show the feasibility of a fully automated MySQL backup and recovery tool. It's being called the MySQL Time Machine and (with all due respect to all vendors with products of similar names) it allows you to recover your data using a datetime value. How cool is that? Even MySQL Backup can't do that!

Build Your Own MySQL Time Machine

While it doesn't have flux capacitors or require a svelte Delorian host, the MySQL Time Machine is still a revelation for MySQL data recovery. It uses a unique combination of replication, point-in-time recovery, backup and restore, and a set of automation tools to provide a web-based automated MySQL backup and recovery tool. Not only does it backup your data at regular intervals, it also allows you to restore to any point in the history of the data -- right up to the second. That's right -- just plug in the date you want to recover and the MySQL Time Machine will do all the work for you. No more digging through the MySQL Reference Manual for esoteric parameters and fiddling with strange command-line tools. You don't even have to know anything about replication to use it! It's easy, it's simple, and it just works.

Disclaimer: The MySQL Time Machine is currently a prototype designed to run on MySQL 6.0. Like all such beasts, it demonstrates features that seem complete and ready to turn loose on the world, but these animals are rarely released as products immediately. This is because prototypes are typically built to either show how something could be done and thrown away in favor of a better design (a proof of concept) or evolve to something far more sophisticated (a mockup of a planned tool). Which direction will the MySQL Time Machine take? Rather than answer that question, stop by the 2009 MySQL Users' Conference next week and take a look. If you like it, tell us what you think. If you really like it, find someone on the Sun MySQL Sales team and give them your use case for why you need it now.

MySQL Conference & Expo 2009
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