Good Morning Build 50

Another new build on our Sun Ray server. Since I managed to upgrade my home server and laptop on Friday this is almost old news:


: estale.eu IA 1 $; uname -a
SunOS estale 5.11 snv_50 sun4u sparc SUNW,Sun-Fire
: estale.eu IA 2 $;

Good though this is the really good bit is this:

: estale.eu IA 2 $; /usr/sbin/psrinfo -v
Status of virtual processor 0 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:13:59.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 1 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 2 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 3 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 512 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 513 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 514 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of virtual processor 515 as of: 10/15/2006 22:58:54
  on-line since 10/14/2006 21:14:08.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 1800 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
: estale.eu IA 4 $; 


The window system is just much snappier. o.k. I am almost single user on this and this is written on the Sun Ray @ home but it is flying. Obviously we are just keeping these CPUs warm in case they are needed for an escalation but they certainly get my vote.


Tags:

Comments:

While they're not needed for escalations, you get the benefit of lightning fast sessions :)

Do you have many thin clients deployed with dual screens in the workplace (Sun Ray 2FS)?

How many simultaneous clients does something like your server support? Is there a formula for working it out?

I'm just loading up Solaris 10 to gain some experience now - very much looking forward to seeing Solaris 11, my initial impressions are 'Cool!' especially with regards ZFS and Zones.

Posted by Alex on October 17, 2006 at 01:15 PM BST #

We have a few dual head setups using the older Sun Rays where 2 appliances can be grouped to form a multi head group. The problem for me with this setup is that it is all or nothing. I found it great to use a twin head system but the pain when you found yourself on a single head system with it flipping screens just to irritating. Since, for me, the best thing about Sun Ray is session mobility I reverted to a single screen.

I don't have a formula for number of users. I imagine it would be heavily dependant on what they were doing. We max out at around 70 users on the Solaris 10 Sun Ray server which is a two board system (8 sockets 2 cores per Socket giving 16 CPUS but these are only the 1200Mhz parts) with 64Gb of Ram. The 1800hz systems typically have 20-30 users on them depending on where we are in the upgrade cycle. However for all our systems the limit on the number of users is the number of people we have at the location. I suspect they would cope with far more than we have thrown at them. One of the advantages of keeping the hardware warm;-)

Using the fair share scheduler means that the systems seem to scale much better than most systems as single users don't impact the borader user base so much.

Posted by Chris Gerhard on October 17, 2006 at 01:47 PM BST #

Very cool stuff, I've been working with a dual head setup for about two years now - typically one large 24" flatscreen (coding) and a 20" (reference, IRC)! Not seen it in many workplaces so was curious about how things are done at Sun - its a definite enhancement to my productivity ;)

Does your 'native' dual head ability with a Sun Ray 2FS use Xinerama in any way? How does it handle equipping a system with two screens that aren't an identical size? Is the X11 server aware of the different geometries, and the window manager able to accommodate this?

Presumably you're effectively using a Sun Ray server as a processing powerhouse, with storage elsewhere provided by NFS or iSCSI? I recently read an article in Paul's blog about upgrading your NFS systems to 10Gig-E - how much of a bottleneck is using Gig-E networking, and since most servers come with (or can be fitted with) three or four 1000Mbit NICs quite cheaply; would this solve the problem?

Sorry for all the questions :) I'm just curious - always used Linux myself, and I've just been reading about the magical ZFS. Tinkering with a build of Solaris Express now on a desktop and wondering what other cool things are possible!

One last question really; how is driver support for storage controllers under Solaris 10? I've been struggling to locate decent information, a definitive list of everything supported... Fileserver here (I'm a student, go easy!) has a Highpoint RR2220 installed and driving eight fairly cheap 250GB SATA drives - I'd be really keen to get that running ZFS now I see the benefits of RAID-Z and other stuff...

Great blog by the way :)

Posted by Alex on October 18, 2006 at 08:59 AM BST #

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This is the old blog of Chris Gerhard. It has mostly moved to http://chrisgerhard.wordpress.com

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