Monday Oct 26, 2009

JFXStudio 'Time' Challenge Winner talks JavaFX


Software architect Mark Nankman was the winner of the September JFXStudio challenge, which required developers to build an application with 30 or fewer lines of code in a single JavaFX file (30 lines as counted by actual lines, or 3,000 characters), with a 'time' theme. Mark's Pacman clock application took first place and caught the attention of many because of the creativity and complexity demonstrated within the small file. Mark has several years of experience in Java programming, and has recently turned his focus to Web 2.0 and RIA development, which is how he became interested in JavaFX. He said he used to develop Adobe Flex front-ends to interact with Java back-ends, but didn't like the fact that it required 3 programming languages! Turning to JavaFX Mark found that the programming language "makes developing maintainable rich web applications a lot easier."

Mark began using JavaFX in October of 2008, and said that he relied primarily on online tutorials to learn the programming language. Among the top sites he utilized are: JavaFX.com, JFXStudio, and Jim Weaver's JavaFXpert blog. When learning JavaFX, Mark set himself a goal to build a complete application, which resulted in his TweetBox Twitter client. To build the application Mark enlisted the help of the JFXtras site as well as the advice of other JavaFX developers. The project is open sourced and Mark is actively looking for other developers to join the project, so be sure to contact him if you are interested!

When discussing Mark's winning Pacman clock application, he noted that it was relatively easy to build, and said he had a functioning product within 30 minutes of starting, stating that with JavaFX “you can do a lot with just a little code.” Mark said he needed to use just a few simple manipulations to keep the code within the 30-line limit, such as using compact SVGPaths, along with several other tricks he listed on his blog. Overall, Mark noted that he was “amazed at just how powerful JavaFX is.” He reported only having to sacrifice one feature in his application – the ability to dynamically resize the clock – which he said simply couldn't be crammed into the 30-line application.

Mark Nankman
Mark Nankman


Mark said his favorite feature with JavaFX is "the fact that all three dimensions of the MVC model can (and must) be programmed and specified in the same, clean language." Mark has already been hard at work on his entry for the October JFXStudio challenge, which has the same 30-line, 3000-character size constraints, with the theme 'five.' For this challenge Mark developed and published a Mayan calculator, based on their ancient counting system, which can be found here. He noted that when developing this application facing the same constraints as last month's challenge he was "yet again amazed by how much you can do with just a few lines of code" in JavaFX.

Read the written Q&A with Mark here.


Wednesday Oct 21, 2009

JavaFX Reviews and How-To Articles


1. Should there be a DB API for JavaFX? –- nick-software.blogspot.com, 10/14
The blogger said he believes that the lack of a DB API is “a possible gaping hole when it comes to developing mobile JavaFX applications.” He stated “it would make sense” to have a database available to run on the high and mid-range mobile devices and gave his argument for why the JavaFX team should develop one.
JavaFX
2. Silverlight vs. JavaFX vs. Flex/AIR -– vinaytechs.blogspot.com, 10/12
The blogger compared three different RIA development platforms (Silverlight, JavaFX, and Flex/AIR)said that even though JavaFX was initially marketed as a Flash-look-alike creative media delivering platform, “the rich UI components allow develop[ing] complex RIA applications.”

3. Creating a Simple Game in JavaFX (Part 1, 2, 3) -– blog.exprimeit.co.uk, 10/15, 10/16
The blogger published a step-by-step account (with code) of how he re-wrote a game originally developed with JavaSE and Java2D in JavaFX since he wanted to see “how much easier writing the game would be using the graphic oriented JavaFX script language.”

4. javax.accessibility for JavaFX –- jfxstudio.wordpress.com, 10/14
Ubivent posted their newly-developed javax.accessibility package with a Swing component now included in the JFrame so as to make up for the lack of native accessibility support in JavaFX “for assisting visually impaired people.” The team described how to use the support and shared the source code for the new solution.

5. Enterprise JavaFX for the Web Platform -– InfoQ.com, 10/12
Peter Pilgrim posted a video presentation he gave at QCon in which he introduced the JavaFX platform, presented the scripting language as well as the standard deployment method of applications, and client applications with the server.

Wednesday Oct 07, 2009

Last Week's JavaFX Reviews and How-To Articles



1. FXStudio small is the new big, challenge submission – Java Development and other BS, 10/1
The blogger said, “it is amazing what you can do in 30 lines of JavaFX script,” when reflecting on his entry into the JavaFXStudio challenge, and also said JavaFX Script is (more) efficient than Java, particularly given the limitations for the challenge.
JavaFX
2. WidgetFX Experiences – JFXperience.com, 9/27
Blogger Yannick reported on the development of his RadioFX Widget entry in the WidgetFX contest saying that he only began working on the widget one week before the deadline which he said, “shows that JavaFX allows for pretty fast application development; with little time you can still make cool things!”

3. Born out of Boredom – Sumit Bisht, 9/26
Blogger Sumit Bisht reported that he is studying JavaFX and admitted that while he was initially skeptical about the technology, a little experience has allayed his fears. He said that his initial impressions with “playing around with this yet-another-scripting-language for the JVM” have him thinking the programming language “is nicely done (especially the integration with NetBeans).”

4. When to use timelines – The JavaFX Journey, 9/26
The blogger stated that “timelines are a critical part of JavaFX,” noting that “the structure of JavaFX's is very concise and robust,” yet too many timelines in a complex system can be tricky and present problems. He gave an example describing his new Clash game and how he successfully moved the timelines to the infinite game loop for better logic and UI performance.

5. Social Networking in Telematics – lodgON, 9/25
Johan Vos described his company's new JavaFX mobile client, which uses GPS data through JSR 179. He said “I was extremely happy and positively surprised when I discovered that JavaFX supports JSR 179,” before continuing to say “this is one of the reasons I believe in JavaFX: easy support for real devices.”

6. Webcam with JavaFX – JavaFX by Kuldip, 9/25
The blogger said that despite its progress, JavaFX “still misses key features like recording of audio or video, accessing of native devices right from within JavaFX.” He acknowledged that it could be done using JMF but noted, “if I have to use Java then why do I need JavaFX...JFX is supposed to be making developers lives way more easier and that is the reason I love it.”

7. Yet Another Simple JavaFX Time-Based animation – JFXStudio: sketch, hack, share, 9/30
Muhammad Hakim posted his JFXStudio challenge time-based application noting how easy it was to create with JavaFX by saying “a half hour I think is enough to create something like this.” He also shared the source code for his application and posted a demonstration video.

8. 30 Lines of JavaFX – Steve on Java, 9/29
Steve Chin discussed his entry into the JFXStudio contest and showed the full code for the application as well as the shorter version he edited to meet the 3,000 character limit (something he noted is not a recommended coding practice). He also noted that all elements were rendered using JavaFX Shape and Text primitives with Perspective Transform effects.

9. JavaFX location example with GPS – lodgON, 9/26
Johan Vos stated that “one of the cool things about the JavaFX Mobile platform running on my HTC Diamond phone is the easy integration with GPS.” He posted a simple JavaFX example with the GPS that demonstrates how to obtain your position in JavaFX.

10. Pickin' and grinnin' with the JFXtras Picker control – James Weaver's JavaFX Blog, 9/25
Jim Weaver demonstrated the newest enhancement to his SpeedReaderFX that now takes advantage of the Picker control created by David Armitage in the JFXtras project. Jim described how the Picker control helps users to quickly choose different entries of a specific feed type.


Thursday Oct 01, 2009

Interview with JavaFX Developer Dean Iverson


Reviews Interactive recently had a conversation with JavaFX developer Dean Iverson. Dean has been writing software professionally for more than 15 years and is one of the co-authors of the recently released Pro JavaFX Platform book,. He is currently employed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute where he is a senior researcher and rich client application developer. He also has a small software consultancy called Pleasing Software Solutions which he co-founded with his wife.

Dean wrote his first lines of JavaFX code at JavaOne in 2007 and developed his first JavaFX application in the summer of 2008 on the preview SDK. With this preview SDK, Dean built a small Web service client for work that he reports “is still in use today.” Dean noted that at the time he was learning JavaFX, “the best source of information was compiler developers.” He subsequently got involved with the Pro JavaFX Platform book with co-authors Jim Weaver, Stephen Chin, and Weiqi Gao because “I loved the language and the runtime and wanted to help spread the word about this awesome new technology stack to a wider audience.”

When asked what he liked the most about JavaFX Dean had a lengthy list of favorites to include: the ability to bind to arbitrary expressions, the declarative syntax, the runtime's CSS-like syntax for styling applications, along with the ability to easily interface with Java code. Dean summed it up by saying: “Suffice it to say that JavaFX has a lot of advanced features, and for me personally it does all this in a way that makes sense. It fits my mind like a glove, so to speak.”
Dean Iverson
Dean Iverson

Dean actively uses JavaFX at work for small- to medium-sized Web service clients, which he said “is really the sweet spot for the technology at the moment.” Looking to the future Dean noted that “JavaFX's killer feature is being able to unify development for all of the devices we see today.” He said continued applet support for the mobile and TV is critical to ensuring people get the rich user experience they have come to expect these days and that “JavaFX has the potential to greatly simplify development in a world populated by such disparate computing platforms.”

Click here to read more of Dean's interview.

Tuesday Sep 29, 2009

Recent JavaFX How-To and Review Articles

JavaFX

1. Using JavaFX Classes Directly From Java – Carstens blog, 9/23
The blogger noted that from the “Swing side of the fence, the grass on the JavaFX side certainly sometimes seems a lot greener,” but said he didn't want to be “bothered with the JavaFX language.” Therefore, he demonstrated how to access JavaFX jars from Swing to get an applet up and running in JavaFX 1.2.
JavaFX
2. Multi-threading options in Rich Internet Applications – Silverlighter, 9/24
Blogger Danijel Stulic stated that the use of multi-threading is a must in any complex RIA in order to avoid poor user experience. He looked at the competing technologies and reported he was surprised that JavaFX script is single-threaded. However, he noted that while all threading options are handled in Java code in the JRE, some multi-threading improvements are expected in the next JavaFX release.

3. DSL Calculator – Arno Raps, 9/23
The blogger presented a DSL calculator created with JavaFX 1.2, which he said “has native support for databinding and charts, saving a lot of time.” He also pointed out that creating the chart in the calculator was very simple because “JavaFX supports a number of charts.”

4. So What Kind of Interesting Things – Sunshine2k's blog, 9/18
The blogger, who has been playing with JavaFX as a hobby said the programming language “has some really cool features like binding, animations, and effects.” He said JavaFX is a “better way to design cooler Java applets” rather than trying to write them in “plain Java.”

5. Wish list for converting Adobe Illustrator Files to JavaFX – Lucas Jordan's Blog, 9/18
Blogger Lucas Johnson said he loves how easily Adobe Illustrator graphics can be exported to “a format friendly JavaFX,” but reported that he struggles with how the nodes are named. He suggested a modification to the naming format that he said “would turn Illustrator and Photoshop into very powerful tools for creating complex content in a JavaFX application.”

6. The Bluffer's Guide to JavaFX , part 1 – Inside RIA, 9/18
Simon Morris took a neutral stance in this article to discuss the pro's and con's of JavaFX. Among the high points he notes that JavaFX is a single declarative language that unites the development of the user interface with writing the code, as well as JavaFX script allowing bound expressions to be as complex as necessary “including numerous variable references to different objects.”

Tuesday Sep 22, 2009

Last Week's JavaFX Reviews and How-To Articles


1. JavaFX + WebStart+ Web Services + GlassFish = One cool client app – cotopia.com, 9/16
The blogger discussed why he chose the JavaFX “eye candy” platform for his client application because it “can be written without major problems.”
JavaFX
2. JavaFX Charts and General Discussion – MarbleMice.com, 9/15
The blogger discussed his recent work with JavaFX charts noting that “JavaFX charts are not really suited to dragging points around and the level of intractability I want.” Therefore, he developed his own simple editable line chart although he stated, “I will still use the JFX Chart everywhere I can as they are pretty easy to use.”

3. Week 3.2 Knowledge Experiment – SpikyOrange, 9/12
Blogger Rob, who admitted to having a “limited knowledge of JavaFX,” developed a small scene graph that “shows you how quickly a newbie can pick up JavaFX and run with it!” He was pleased to find the code required for his experiment was pretty small and said “I think I am going to like JavaFX!”

4. New Graphics – New Challenges – The JavaFX Journey, 9/11
The blogger reported that he recently reworked the graphics engine in his JavaFX game Clash, and said “fortunately for me, JavaFX is able to handle it in spades.” He noted that JavaFX can handle up to 50 characters on the screen, moving at different times and said “I am beyond pleasantly surprised that it can.”

5. JavaFX wordpress calendar widget – Michel LeBlond Blog, 9/17
The blogger completed a redesign and integration of the JavaFX calendar widget to function in Wordpress. He said the applet was modified using NetBeans and the Bluefish HTML editor and described how the widget was further customized and optimized to perform on Wordpress.

6. Adding feeds to SpeedReaderFX that don't \*quite\* comply with the RSS/Atom formats – James Weaver's JavaFX blog, 9/16
Jim Weaver found that when adding feeds to his SpeedReaderFX application's criteria dialog, some of them did not comply with the RS/Atom formats, so he described how to create a custom feed parser, which he was able to add to the app.

7. JavaFX and RSS – Macca Blog, 9/14
Blogger Mark revisited the RSS feature in JavaFX, which he noted people “tend to quickly forget about,” and described and demonstrated the RSS support in JavaFX in this tutorial by working with the javafx.data.feed.rss package and the RssTask class.

8. JavaFX classes constructors – Mils in a Nutshell, 9/14
The blogger reported that he had been struggling with a JavaFX object oriented model because there were no classes constructors in JavaFX. He did find a way to combine several steps to create a type of constructor (similar to Java) and demonstrated how to do so in this tutorial.

9. Sticky Note, A JavaFX Tutorial – Gooder Code, 9/12
Blogger Kerry posted a tutorial that demonstrated how he developed his first JavaFX program called Sticky Note, that mimics the Windows 7 feature Sticky Notes. He said it provides a sticky note that the user can open and fill with reminders, which are saved and restored between application runs.

10. JavaFX Password Field – Martin Matula's Blog, 9/12
Blogger Martin reported that since there is no password field in JavaFX, he decided to create one since he was not pleased with any of the workarounds he discovered. He presented his Password Field and the code to create it in this post, and described it as “an elegant and simple solution,” noting that “it looks and behaves exactly as you would expect of a password field.”

11. Using Transitions to Simplify JavaFX Animations – InformIT, 9/9
Jeff Friesen discussed how JavaFX simplifies common animations by providing “canned” animation transition classes, which he introduced in this tutorial. He also shows how to create your own additional classes in this in-depth tutorial.

Monday Aug 24, 2009

Jonathan Giles on JavaFX


Reviews Interactive recently talked with Jonathan Giles, a JavaFX evangelist and software engineer from New Zealand who primarily builds enterprise applications and specializes in user interface/user experience development. Jonathan is a huge fan of Java, and is well-known among Java developers for publishing his 'Java desktop links of the week' on his blog. Jonathan, as a developer of enterprise software, approaches JavaFX with a different perspective, and looks to see the program utilized in various enterprise applications in the form of controls such as buttons, lists, menubars, tables, and trees.

Jonathan is a relatively new developer in the JavaFX environment, and only recently began working with the program after winning a trip to JavaOne in the “Dude, where's my pass?” contest. Jonathan reported that at JavaOne he was “brainwashed” by members of the JavaFX team when they showed him the work that had been done on controls. He stated: “I was pleasantly surprised and for the first time saw huge potential in JavaFX to be a player in the enterprise software arena, as well as in other areas...such as RIA.”

True to form, Jonathan reported that his favorite feature in the JavaFX 1.2 release is the new controls and the framework around them and noted “JavaFX 1.2 created a very good, clean foundation for future JavaFX releases to include new controls.” Jonathan just finished an early release of a JavaFX menubar control which “allows people to have the 'File' and other menus atop their applications,” and is now available in the JFXtras project.
Jonathan Giles
Jonathan Giles

As to the future of JavaFX, Jonathan said “I want to see the future of JavaFX continue its focus on building out controls,” which he said he would like to see followed up with an improved graphics stack and improved performance. He stated that once that happens a JavaFX application framework should be developed and made available. Jonathan believes if this happens JavaFX “will be at the point where it can be seriously considered and used by people wanting to build enterprise software.”

To read more of Jonathan's interview click here.

Tuesday Aug 18, 2009

Interview with JavaFX Developer Stephen Chin


Reviews Interactive recently spoke with JavaFX developer Stephen Chin, a prolific developer and blogger within the JavaFX community. Steve is one of the co-authors of the recently released Pro JavaFX Platform book, and was also named a JavaOne 2009 Rock Star for his WidgetFX session. Steve began working in JavaFX in May 2008, after being challenged by Sun's Josh Marinacci to write a program in JavaFX. The challenge turned into the development of WidgetFX, and has kept Steve “heavily involved with JavaFX,” ever since.

Steve recently launched a new JFXtras Community Site, which is an open resource and forum for the entire JavaFX community. Steve pulled together samples from multiple contributors across the JavaFX community under a commercial-friendly, open-source license. The samples are intended to help users learn and explore the language. The site also features additional JavaFX resources and documentation. Steve also continues to work with WidgetFX, a desktop widget framework for Java written entirely and JavaFX, as well as JFXtras, a component and add-on library for JavaFX.

In discussing the new JavaFX 1.2 release Steve said, “Java FX 1.2 is a huge step forward for the platform!” He stated that the Skinnable Controls, New Layout Classes, and Charting Support are, in his opinion, the most important new features in the release. When asked how JavaFX has changed the way developers create RIAs Steve said: “JavaFX takes the best of client technology with a rich scenegraph, elegant animation support, and built-in media playback, and combines this with web service access, designer skinning and tools, and full browser integration....for the first time, Java client and Web developers can join forces to build applications that are immersive, rather than tiered.”
Stephen Chin
Stephen Chin


Commenting on the future of JavaFX, Steve noted that all modern technology startups are required to demonstrate their technology working across a wide variety of mediums, which generally requires programming in 5 or 6 different languages with incompatible feature sets and code bases. Therefore, Steve believes “JavaFX brings the promise of write-once, run-anywhere to all of these screens, which will dramatically reduce time-to-market of innovative solutions, and unlock applications that we can't even dream of today.”

To read more of Steve's interview click here.

Thursday Jun 18, 2009

Recent JavaFX reviews from developers


1. Inkscape and JavaFX - Almost There -- Lucas Jordan's Blog, 6/16
Lucas Jordan has looked into whether JavaFX content can be exported from Inkscape or GIMP based on a question presented to his panel at JavaOne. After some research, he discovered Inkscape does, but with a great deal of limitations. He explains his test results in-depth and notes that while it is far from perfect, "this is a really good start, and it is excellent to see JavaFX included in Inkscape at all."
JavaFX
2. A Game Programming Perspective -- The JavaFX Journey, 6/16
The blogger explains why he believes JavaFX is a good gaming framework/engine, and why the 1.2 release helps enable that in this in-depth post. He says "The future of good interfaces is in widgets, fluidity, and maximizing the users productivity. JavaFX gives you the tools to create a truly unique experience, and will let you re-use your existing Java code."

3. Learning JavaFX -- java.net, 6/14
John O'Conner confesses that he stopped tinkering with, reading about, and writing about JavaFX several years ago believing "JavaFX wasn't ready for prime time." However, he now says "JavaFX certainly seems to be the future of desktop applications," and that for developers who want to continue developing Java desktop user interfaces, "the future is JavaFX."

4. JKstat meet JavaFX -- The Trouble with Tribbles, 6/14
Blogger Peter Tribble was excited at the new availability of JavaFX for Solaris and OpenSolaris and decided to try using JavaFX to make a graphical front-end to JKstat. Although he was able to integrate JKstat and JavaFX, he notes a number of issues he encountered getting it to work to include JavaFX not supporting either Java Collections or Generics, as well as not being able to put the jni shared library directly into the right JavaFX library directory.

5. Installing JavaFX -- Learning JavaFX, 6/13
The blogger writes that there are "3 easy ways to get started with JavaFX Script," noting that although it's very easy to use JavaFX from NetBeans "you have plenty of other options too." He then lists the options to getting all the "tools" necessary to get started with JavaFX.

6. Why JavaFX fits the bill for RIAs -- IT Knowledge Exchange, 6/12
Jan Stafford has posted a video in which she talked with authors Jim Clarke and Eric Bruno about JavaFX. She notes that in the interview they explain how JavaFX "simplifies and improves the RIA development process."

7. JavaFX and Google Maps -- StartClass 0830, 6/11
The blogger writes that he has recently "taken a very keen interest in JavaFX" stating that his "exploration with JavaFX has been very fruitful." He notes JavaFX "is really easy to pick up and to be productive with it in a matter of hours," and then demonstrates a project in which he incorporates Google Maps into a JavaFX application.

8. JavaFX Script as a general purpose language? -- java.net, 6/11
Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein writes in this in-depth analysis that the Java language has come to a dead-end," and says "JavaFX script really could be a very viable candidate to the role of successor or companion to Java as a language for implementation of full Java applications."

9. JavaFX binding is neat, but ... beware -- java.net, 6/11
Fabrizio Giudici writes that he likes binding a lot, but has found some adverse effects that can arise out of its use in JavaFX. He gives an example of how an external class has broken even though it was fine by itself noting "we have injected a problem," and continues to say "this is a worse breakage than breaking information hiding in Java by getters/setters."

10. First look at JavaFX 1.2, Part II -- java.net, 6/10
Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein has been testing JavaFX 1.2 using a series of benchmarks and has noted the "results are surprising," and that "we can see interesting potential (in JavaFX 1.2)."

Tuesday Jun 16, 2009

From JavaOne 2009 Memory Lane...

JavaOne Radio
Yours Truly, Gail Anderson and Paul Anderson at the JavaOne Radio Booth

This year at JavaOne, I hosted couple of segments in our JavaOne Radio. The picture above is from one of the JavaFX book sessions -- authors Gail and Paul Anderson were talking about JavaFX and their new book. I had another discussion with authors Eric Bruno and Jim Clarke on JavaFX and the book "JavaFX: Developing Rich Internet Applications." Check these and other good JavaFX books (like this one) if you are planning to learn about JavaFX. The JavaOne Radio segments are below.

I have to admit that the most cool thing I saw at JavaOne 2009 had nothing to do with software though -- it was a plug adapter-sized "computer." It was suprising (to me) to see how much compute power and memory these guys had put in such a small form factor. It was fun talking with the "plug computer" guys at the show. (And the BlogTalkRadio stats show that it was one of the highest listened to segments as well.)

Tuesday May 12, 2009

At a Glance: Last Week's OpenSolaris, VirtualBox and NetBeans Reviews


OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris and ZFS had blogs buzzing last week, starting off with a look at OpenSolaris 2009.06 from Phoronix’s Michael Larabel who called out several feature improvements. Michael highlighted the Image Packaging System, ZFS snapshot time-slider and new desktop artwork, as well as saying the new “Firefox package is bleeding edge.” OpenSolaris
Blogger Simon shared an extensive post about his experiences using Solaris and ZFS on a home fileserver, concluding that he “learnt a lot over the last year about ZFS, and using it has convinced me that I made the right choice in selecting both Solaris and ZFS.”

Gabe Reys, a Solaris systems administrator for a multi-national company, published almost 40 posts to date. His topics include everything from helpful tips on using global and non-global zones in Solaris, to managing ZFS filesystems, to basic and advanced uses of DTrace.


VirtualBox
Sun xVM VirtualBox
VirtualBox 2.2 continued to garner positive blogger reviews this week, as Brighthub’s Steve Mallard gave VirtualBox a 5 out of 5 rating in his review that said installation was “straightforward and easy.” Steve also noted that, “VirtualBox has dozens of options and features found in virtualization software that cost hundreds of dollars…the value of virtualization cannot be stressed enough.”

Blogger Tom Puleo said he was really happy with VirtualBox, and “when given the chance, will choose it over Virtual PC or VMware.” He said he liked VirtualBox because it is “fast” and “great for day to day use.”

Blogger Carl reported that he has experimented with a lot of virtualization software and had “come to like VirtualBox best.” After switching his Windows XP virtual machine from VMware to VirtualBox, Carl says “I'm not likely to switch back from VirtualBox any time soon.”


NetBeans
NetBeans 6.7 was the focus of several positive reviews this week, with Dean at Grails Blog saying that the 6.7 Beta is a great release for the Grails community. Dean noted, “NetBeans' support of Grails functionality is nearly on par with that of IntelliJ 8.1.”
NetBeans
The blogger from cld.blog-city.com stated that the new release of NetBeans has excellent support for PHP, and highlighted key aspects such as syntax highlighting, a navigator, and code folding, as well as “nice support for PHP debugging.”

Blogger Brian Silberbauer discussed how when he’s teaching a course on JEE, he begins with NetBeans. He noted, “This is a great help to the students as it gives them the overview of what we will be working with and shows them how quick and easy it is to create a JEE application in NetBeans - It takes the complexity fear out of them (to a certain extent).”

Tuesday May 05, 2009

Recent JavaFX reviews from developers


1. Flex vs. JavaFX -- alexonrails, 4/28
Blogger Alexis Tejeda describes JavaFX as the "Flash of Java" but with a layer that allows you to customize features to improve user experience on the front end while allowing you to make the application more visually appealing.
JavaFX
2. The Future of JavaFX -- lodgON, 4/27
Blogger Johan Vos says that as a software developer, there is a clear benefit to using JavaFX. He says using JavaFX means that in web-based projects he can focus on the functionality, and not the coding. Johan says that the more projects his group develops on JavaFX, the smaller the total cost compared to a project with standard web technologies, which allows for more customers to afford interactive sites.

3. JavaFX: I'm Starting To Believe -- java.dzone.com, 4/27
James Sugrue believes that one of JavaFX's main strengths is "the type of user interfaces that are possible." He says that the more examples of JavaFX he sees, the more he is "starting to believe that it has its place for Java developers."

4. Groovy and JavaFX, more useful together? -- LEXECORP, 4/26
Alex Garrett is playing around with using both JavaFX and Groovy in a project because he likes the scripting language of Groovy but loves the "eye-candy capable JavaFX." He concludes that while it may not be a marriage made in heaven, he enjoyed it because he wants to develop a "beautiful looking product" that he can get with JavaFX.

5. JDK 6u14 almost ready at b05; Making Java load faster and lighter -- Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein's Blog, 4/24
Osvaldo Pinali is interested in anything that will allow Java to load faster and consume less resources, and compares to previous benchmarks the new JRE 6u14b05. After testing, Osvaldo still believes that JavaFX apps can still get rid of further Swing dependencies, perhaps with some Swing classes, which he suspects might be possible by refactoring the repository to not be hardwired to Swing classes.

6. JavaFX Finally Peaks My Interest -- Dominic Da Silva's Blog, 4/23
Dominic Da Silva recently attended a talk by Jim Clarke on JavaFX and was "impressed" with the JavaFX language, particularly the ability to drag an in-browser JavaFX applet out of the browser and have it run on the desktop, even after the browser closes. Dominic thinks "JavaFX can have a good future with the right marketing and the support of the community."

Monday May 04, 2009

At a Glance: Last week's NetBeans, OpenOffice and MySQL reviews


NetBeans
Blogger Sean discovered the powerful profiling engine in NetBeans, which helped him understand the memory usage and consumption of each property, method call and object instant in his program. Programming Blogs posted about integration with Project Kenai in NetBeans 6.7 Beta. Another Programming Blogs writer said the NetBeans IDE provided a Web Services Manager that supported SaaS applications and it was much easier for Java developers to access all the popular SaaS services on the web. Blogger Carl McDade tried many of the FOSS IDE’s and editors and settled on NetBeans for erlang development, then provided instructions to set up NetBeans to get syntax highlighting and debugging with detailed explanations. NetBeans

OpenOffice.org
OpenOffice.org
The blogger at SoftSailor highlighted some of the program features in OpenOffice.org and says the “great advantage” of this suite is that the interface is similar to MS Office, which makes it easy for a user to “switch sides” without having to re-adapt to a completely different environment. Peter Jaques urged people to try OpenOffice.org because, “it's basically 99% compatible, and I bet you won't need Microsoft at all. Really!” Blogger Brendan Vittum wrote a tutorial on how to create a database shell in OpenOffice.org BASE, saying “users of all levels, novice, intermediate, or expert will find the collection of Wizards, Design Views, and straight SQL Views an intuitive means of creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports.”

MySQL
Despite some of the concerns floating around the MySQL Conference, Linux Magazine wrote there was good news coming out of the event. The article noted the MySQL developers stated they will return to a 'release early, release often' schedule, and the pending 5.4 release has a number of features worth keeping an eye on. A writer at the MySQL Performance Blog noted that he had a chance to take a look at TokuDB and run some benchmarks. The blogger reported that tuning TokuDB was much easier than InnoDB, and that there were only a few parameters to change. Core Security Patterns Weblog discussed how enabling SSL/TLS based MySQL connections ensure trusted communication between MySQL clients and the database server. MySQL

Friday Apr 24, 2009

JavaFX how-to articles from developers


1. Is August Lammersdorf a Propller-Head? (JavaFX meets Java 3D animation) - James Weaver's JavaFX Blog, 4/17
James Weaver revisits the work of August Lammersdorf of InteractiveMes.org, who is "developing infrastructure that connects Java 3D and JavaFX, in which the 3D canvas is rendered in a lightweight component." James says that August's work will make it easier for developers to create applications in JavaFX that feature a Java 3D universe, and takes a look at a piston and propeller in a virtual space rendered on puzzle pieces in JavaFX.
JavaFX
2. Project Goliath: Part 3: SoundKit - JavaFX BBC Micro Sound Emulation Demo - Peter Pilgrim Java Champion Enterprise Weblog, 4/17
Peter Pilgrim has been working hard on part three of Project Goliath, which is a "shoot-em-up" arcade game written in JavaFX. For this part of the project Peter has recreated a BBC sound emulator in JavaFX, and gives a complete rundown of the demonstration, and how he utilized numerous JavaFX components in its development.

3. Deploying Swing and JavaFX applications to the masses - JavaWorld, 4/21
Blogger Java Jeff writes that JavaFX's success depends largely upon how easily the user can install JavaFX on their platform and launch JavaFX applications with ease. So, he tested several deployment exercises and discusses his ease-of-installation and reliability findings for four different browsers in addition to an oddity he found in the JavaFX 1.0 and 1.1 compilers, where he was able to invoke functions that do not exist.

4. JavaFX, it has merit - LEXECORP, 4/20
Alex Garrett, who last reported on his struggles with the JavaFX language, started trying out the graphics this past weekend and has determined that "graphics is certainly JavaFX's forte." He compared a mock version of his application created in Groovy to one in JavaFX and said the Groovy version is "ugly as sin" while the mockup in JavaFX has "sparkle."

Monday Apr 20, 2009

At a Glance: Last week's JavaFX, OpenSolaris and MySQL reviews


JavaFX
JavaFX continued its strong introduction to the developer blogs. IBM developer/blogger Bob Balfe called JavaFX the "most pervasive platform in the world," and discussed it being an Adobe Flash killer. He concluded saying, "I am sure we will be hearing more about JavaFX in the near future." The blogger from Softified gave a thorough introduction to JavaFX, as well as tips for downloading, coding, and sample applications.
JavaFX

OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris and ZFS received positive praise from bloggers this week. The blogger from Me, Myself and I said that the Solaris version of the Cg Toolkit was a "nice Solaris package" that worked "flawlessly" in OpenSolaris. He also noted he "can't wait for the native Skype port, especially for OpenSolaris." Blogger Teodor Milkov discussed operating systems supporting DTrace, highlighting Solaris and OpenSolaris. After installing he said that "everything was smooth... I was thinking about playing with ZFS these days anyway."

MySQL
MySQL use in the enterprise was the focus of a post from Enterprise Systems this week, discussing the scalability of MySQL for business use. Author Richard Cooley said that "MySQL is scalable if you look at the entire architecture and not just at the database tier," noting that prominent MySQL users include Yahoo, YouTube, AOL, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and WordPress. "If these companies can run portions of their companies on MySQL so can you."
Sun MySQL

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