Wednesday Dec 02, 2009

Now Available: Solaris Cluster 3.2 11/09 Software


Today Sun announced the availability of the Solaris Cluster 3.2 11/09 software. Listen to the short podcast below for the details.



Friday Nov 20, 2009

Japanese Online Map Provider Improves User Experience with Sun Technology


Mapion Co. Ltd. is Japan's leading provider of online map services with more than 700,000 page views every day. The company offers the free Mapion online map search service for driving and public transportation routes; the fee-based service Mapion Mobile, which delivers navigation tools and directions to mobile phones; and the Mapion BB service for broadband users, that smoothly and instantaneously refreshes as the user navigates around the map.
Sun Customer Mapion
(Image courtesy: Mapion)
To remain competitive, Mapion must constantly innovate and improve the details in its maps and the services it provides and needs a stable system with minimal downtime and scalability to handle a large increase in users, without a deterioration in response time. In 2008, Mapion had to relocate its data center because of increasing power consumption needs, and saw the relocation as an opportunity to start a full-scale upgrade of the hardware, software, and operating system supporting its map information services.

Mapion chose to deploy the Solaris 10 Operating System along with Solaris Containers to ensure effective use of available resources for map image generation. Mapion also adopted the Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server as its application server, and the MySQL Cluster database as a real-time database for mission-critical applications for Mapion Mobile. Mapion standardized its hardware environment in its new data center on a Sun platform, deploying 18 Sun Fire X4150 servers, 3 Sun Blade 6000 modular systems, 3 Sun Blade X6250 servers, 1 Sun Blade T6320 server, and the Sun Storage Tek 9985V system for storage consolidation and virtualization.

Mapion also decided to renew its customer management system for Mapion Mobile, a system that needed to be available 24/7. Mapion adopted the MySQL Cluster Database because it allows for the availability of existing applications through its 'shared-nothing' distributed architecture with no single point of failure, to meet Mapion's mission-critical application requirements of 99.999% availability, which, coupled with automatic data partitioning with load balancing, allows almost unlimited database scalability for the company. The new customer management system for Mapion Mobile went live in January 2009, “with downtime reduced to near zero,” according to Koji Kozono, who works in the Technology Development Department, Service Development Group at Mapion.

By standardizing its IT infrastructure on a Sun platform, Mapion enjoys unified support from Sun Spectrum Support that keeps the operation running smoothly while substantially reducing costs that would arise from resolving problems. The Sun GlassFish Enterprise server has provided Mapion with a cost-effective platform for developing and delivering applications. Yukio Hasehawa, Manager of the Operational Technology Group, Mapion Technology Development Department, stated that switching to GlassFish resulted in a substantial reduction in the operational management workload and said: “It offers easy-to-use functions which are indispensable in day-to-day operations, including batch deployment to multiple application servers.”

Check out the complete details here.

Thursday Nov 12, 2009

Sun Solutions Help Support 25% Monthly Growth at SoundCloud


Web 2.0 startup SoundCloud provides a Web-based platform that is giving artists and other music-industry professionals an easy way to share music from a central location. More than 250,000 customers already rely on SoundCloud's service to send, receive, and distribute music. Initially, SoundCloud built its offering with a custom Web application that made use of hardware running Linux and a database built with MySQL Community Edition, storing all files remotely using S3 and EC2 services from Amazon.
Sun Customer SoundCloud
(Image courtesy: SoundCloud)
However, by the end of 2008, the hardware supporting the Web application and database neared capacity and could no longer meet performance requirements, making availability an issue. SoundCloud evaluated its options and found an ideal solution with Sun Startup Essentials, which allowed the company to take advantage of discounted Sun technologies as well as hosting services through EveryCity, a managed services provider in London.

EveryCity hosts customer environments on virtual servers built with Solaris Containers, housed on Sun Fire X4150 servers. To alleviate I/O bottlenecks, and to help meet cost constraints, each virtual server stores data in a ZFS hybrid storage pool located on a Sun Storage 7210 Unified Storage System with Solid State Disk technology, which is accessed via the iSCSI protocol. Additionally, built-in analytics leveraging Solaris DTrace and the Sun Fault Management Architecture quickly identify issues, help speed resolution, and provide specific information to fine tune architectures and applications.

The migration took place in January 2009, and was completed in only 10 hours. With the new solution, customer requests are now processed by multiple instances of the Web application running with a cluster of Solaris Containers. Customer information, images, and artwork is tracked in a database that runs on a Sun Fire X4150 server, and the database is stored on eight 15k RPM SAS disks, striped and mirrored using the ZFS file system.

With the new solution in place, the Web application driving SoundCloud maintains 99.99% availability and supports rapid growth, which is critical because the number of users has grown from 20,000 to 250,000, and the site now processes about three million dynamic page requests per day. Sean Treadway, Chief Architect at SoundCloud said: “With our Sun solution we have a good strategy for scaling different application bottlenecks and are no longer limited by a fixed storage-pool size. We can grow our storage pool as required without having to worry about where the space is or how it will work.”

Check out the complete details here.

Friday Sep 18, 2009

Sun News -- The Week in Review


In the weekly Sun News podcast, Maijaliisa and I talk about the Sun and Oracle Exadata Database Machine Version 2 announcement, Software Freedom Day and Sun's 2009 Corporate Social Responsibility Report.

Enjoy!



Wednesday Sep 09, 2009

TweetMeme Manages 85% Monthly Growth with MySQL Enterprise and Sun Startup Essentials Program


TweetMeme is a social media company that is quickly becoming one of the most popular Web 2.0 sites in the world. TweetMeme uses custom-made software to count the number of links posted on Twitter, which it then organizes into categories on its Web site so visitors to the site can easily find stories that interest them. Visitors can also cast their own votes by “retweeting” a story through their own Twitter account, which in turn increases a story's popularity.

Sun Customer TweetMeme
(Image courtesy: TweetMeme)
TweetMeme has experienced tremendous growth in recent months, experiencing 85% month-on-month growth in unique visitors and serving more than 1.6 billion retweet buttons each month.. TweetMeme uses open-source software, running the Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system, Apache HTTP server software, and MySQL database. TweetMeme has worked closely with Sun since its launch earlier this year, taking advantage of the Sun Startup Essentials program for support, discounts on hardware, and specialist advice.

TweetMeme has focused on maximizing uptime because, as founder Nick Halstead noted, “Downtime has the potential to break a social media business.” Sun Startup Essentials has helped TweetMeme keep pace with the fast-moving social media industry by migrating TweetMeme to MySQL Enterprise, deployed on a mixture of 10 Sun Fire X4440 and Sun Fire X4150 servers. The MySQL Enterprise subscription includes expert technical support for the database and advanced database monitoring tools, which enable TweetMeme to optimize performance and maximize uptime.

The new hardware is delivering impressive results and helping to reduce IT costs through simpler maintenance and reduced power consumption, while offering outstanding availability and utilization. TweetMeme continues to expand rapidly, with the site analyzing, categorizing, and indexing more than 50,000 links per hour, while handling 600 million retweets per month. With its new solution, TweetMeme can grow without worry, thanks to the MySQL Enterprise database, that will scale to meet any level of exponential growth in the future. Halstead recognizes this significant advantage and noted: “Things move so quickly in this industry that you can't afford any distractions. But thanks to Sun, we can now focus on strategy rather than on technology.”

Check out the complete details, including a podcast, here.

Tuesday Jul 28, 2009

At a Glance: Last Week's Reviews


NetBeans
Starting off last week’s positive reviews was eWEEK’s Jeff Cogswell, who reviewed NetBeans IDE 6.7, finding that while it’s a .7 release, it “includes so many new features it could rightfully receive a full version increment.” A long-time fan of NetBeans blogged that version 6.7 was “faster than its predecessors,” and also noted its native integration, which he called “impressive.” Blogger Haroon wrote that NetBeans 6.7’s native Maven integration was a “good and productive” feature that convinced him to “shift from Eclipse to NetBeans 6.7.” Lastly, long time NetBeans user Iwan Eising praised Version 6.7’s almost seamless compatibility with older versions, saying that it “makes testing NetBeans a better experience.”

VirtualBox
Jeff James at Windows IT Pro gave top marks to VirtualBox 3.0, calling it “an impressive product with an unbeatable price tag” that “competes well with the likes of VMware Workstation and Parallels Desktop.” Blogger Haroon wrote about his first experience with VirtualBox saying, “I find it really awesome,” and noted that in full-screen mode, no-one could tell that the guest OS such as Vista or XP was actually running over Ubuntu. Another blogger wrote that VirtualBox was the ideal program for a “developer that wants to tinker,” and pointed out that “server consolidation is one great thing VirtualBox can offer.” Rounding out the group was a blogger from Techfuels who posted instructions on how to save VirtualBox to a portable drive to run consistently on any desktop, noting that “these techniques allow you to be completely independent.”

MySQL
Bloggers this week explored a variety of useful MySQL tools, with one from Development GuRu taking advantage of the MySQL Optimize Table command. He called it “very useful for tables that are frequently updated and/or deleted.” Blogger Grig Gheorghiu focused on managing multiple MySQL instances, and concluded that the MySQL Sandbox “does make your life much easier.”

OpenOffice
Linux.com’s Jacqueline Emigh kicked off the reviews for OpenOffice.org this week, recommending OpenOffice.org's Write program for anyone “seeking a smooth learning curve from MS Word.” Another blogger described the OpenOffice Suite in Ubuntu as “the perfect blend you need for all your office needs.” LinuxJournal’s Bruce Byfield chimed in with a tutorial on using OpenOffice’s DataPilots, which he said offered “convenient ways to perform statistical analyses.” Finally, a blogger got hands-on with OpenOffice.org and created a template and tutorial for making printable flash cards.

JavaFX
Java Pilot blogger Walter Bogaardt reported on his testing of JavaFX, noting that “it definitely gives a face lift to the Java GUI applications from an RIA.” Another blogger, who had read reports of large scene graphs affecting JavaFX performance, re-evaluated a game he had written and offered JavaFX optimization tips along the way. Finally, a blogger decided to experiment with Maven, stating that using JavaFX 1.2 with Maven 2.2 made it “somewhat easy to integrate a build with JavaFX complier.”

Wednesday Jul 22, 2009

At a Glance: Last Week's Reviews


VirtualBox
Computerworld’s Steven Vaughn-Nichols tested VirtualBox 3.0 on a variety of systems and platforms, concluding that “you owe it to yourself to try VirtualBox… It’s never been easier and VirtualBox has never been better.” Jack Wallen from TechRepublic came to the same conclusion, calling VirtualBox “one of the easiest of all virtualization products available,” and made special mention of its “amazing” Seamless mode. Blogger Tara focused on VirtualBox's speed when she wrote, “VirtualBox's disk throughput is phenomenal, in fact, this is the first time I've seen almost-native speed disk in [a] virtual machine,” concluding that “it's an awesome app.” Rounding out the group was a blogger who praised VirtualBox’s seamless mode and noted that “the graphics also feel nicer and run faster.”

JavaFX
Praise for JavaFX this week started with blogger Matt Van Bergen, who discussed how the RIA platform of JavaFX makes Internet based applications much more user-friendly and intuitive. Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein focused on JavaFX 1.2’s overall update, concluding that 1.2 was “a much needed update that fixed important holes and performance bottlenecks.” Blogger Jim Weaver turned his attention to the JavaFX-powered Indaba online recording studio, noting that JavaFX “enables recording high-quality audio directly onto the client platform.”

NetBeans
NetBeans beat out the competition this week starting with a longtime TextMate user who made the switch to NetBeans, calling the IDE’s features “just amazing.” A different blogger wrote, “I've tested many, many IDE's and options for programming and getting your work done. But…NetBeans gets the first prize.” Finally, blogger JJ Behrens, who has been using NetBeans for six months, noted that NetBeans is “way easier to get up to speed with than Eclipse.”

OpenSolaris
Bloggers highlighted a range of Solaris and OpenSolaris features, with blogger Alan Fineberg, a computer science and engineering student at University of Washington, calling Dtrace “awesome.” ZFS Mirror also earned a thumbs up from a blogger who explained how much easier Solaris 10’s ZFS Mirror makes the difficult work of breaking down a large task into smaller sub-tasks. A third blogger then gave a step-by-step guide showcasing how “easy it is to recover your favorite OS after installing” for what he called a “glorious recovery.”

OpenOffice
OpenOffice.org won new followers this week, including a blogger who reported his surprise with “the incredible power of OpenOffice.org” writing that “it has completely blown me away.” Blogger Peter Daley described OpenOffice as “a very sophisticated office suite,” and called it “a viable alternative” to Microsoft Office. Finally, blogger Travis Hampton got hands-on with OpenOffice, posting the first part in a series of tutorials on how to prepare an OpenOffice.org document in book form.

MySQL
Kicking things off was a blogger at Rawseo, who explained why developers should opt for MySQL instead of Access, naming features such as MySQL’s attractive free price tag, multiple-user access, better management of large databases and increased security. Other developers focused on making MySQL even better, with one providing a list of the chief principles for optimizing PHP and MySQL scripts, while Linux Magazine’s Jeremy Zawodny, who has used MySQL for almost a decade, offered helpful tips based on MySQL problems he’s seen in the past.

Thursday Jul 16, 2009

French company reduces costs with Sun open-source solution


Symeos, a Web services security startup based in France, provides online identity management and federated authentication services to organizations in Western Europe and the United States. Symeos offers innovative single sign-on technologies for customers across multiple industries, helping to protect organizations against e-commerce online scams and identity thefts.
Sun Customer Symeos
As the demand for increased security and online identity management and authentication solutions continued to increase, Symeos created a new identity management product called EGO. Symeos quickly needed a completely new virtualized platform to support the more than 10 million expected users of EGO. The company turned to Sun to provide a high performance, low energy consumption solution that was open source, fast, scalable, and secure.

Symeos ordered 8 Sun Blade T6340 Server Modules with UltraSPARC T2 Plus processors and 12 Sun Blade X6250 Server Modules with Intel Xeon processors. The company also purchased two Sun Blade 6000 Chassis to house the machines; and to protect the platform’s data, the company chose a Sun Storage 7410 Unified Storage System together with a Sun Storage J4000 Array. The infrastructure runs on the Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris Operating Systems. The blade servers provide support for Web solutions that include the Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server v3, the Sun GlassFish Web Space Server 10, and the open-source offerings of the MySQL Database, the Sun OpenDS directory server, and Sun OpenSSO Enterprise.

Symeos built the finished platform over a period of two months, and after testing, plans to launch the by the end of the year. Because Symeos used open-source and open-standard technology throughout, the business expects to lower future development costs by about 60%. Herve Prot, Chief Executive Officer of Symeos said: “With the support of Sun, we have developed a cost-effective identity management platform that offers customers 99.999% availability and is easily scalable.”

Check out the complete details here.

Tuesday Jul 14, 2009

At a Glance: Last Week's Reviews


Virtualbox
VirtualBox 3.0 received rave reviews this week beginning with Ars Technica’s Ryan Paul, who called VirtualBox his “preferred desktop virtualization solution,” noting its excellent integration between guest and host environments. Rick Vanover, a self-proclaimed fan of VirtualBox, also highlighted the updated functionality of the 3.0 release while the Chicago Sun-Times’ Andy Ihnatko made special mention of the “practically seamless” integration with “your ‘real’ PC.” A blogger at we3geeks couldn’t agree more, stating that VirtualBox “has to be one of the coolest pieces of software I think I've come across. Ever.”

JavaFX
Developers highlighted a wide variety of features this week starting with blogger Carl Dea, who noted, “One of the most impressive features that I've seen relating to JavaFX, is the ability of an Applet to interact with the browser via JavaScript and HTML.” In a different post, Carl was also pleased with the usability of strings in JavaFX, pointing out that “the added clarity will help people debug better.” Rounding out the group was Jim Weaver, who noted that with the JavaFX 1.2 release, it is easy “to create a ProgressIndicator that reflects the progress of a task such as HttpRequest.”

OpenSolaris
Accolades for OpenSolaris began this week with eWeek’s Jason Brooks, who tested out OpenSolaris 2009.06 and was most impressed with the flexibility and functionality of Crossbow network virtualization. A blogger from Blog O’Matty focused on a different feature, praising Solaris' “ability to generate a core file when a system panics,” which he felt was more seamless than in Linux.

MySQL
Bloggers focused this week on the excellent troubleshooting tools offered by MySQL. One blogger opted to use the MySQL workbench tool, noting the stability and good overall quality of the program. Another chose a different route, demonstrating how to use Performance Tuning Primer Script in order to tune MySQL, a technique he noted is “easy to use and offers valuable output for MySQL performance optimization.”

NetBeans
Bloggers were active trying out the new NetBeans 6.7, yielding some great results in the process. Blogger Chandika, an Eclipse user, tested NetBeans 6.7 and was “seriously impressed” by its functionality and performance. Blogger James called NetBeans 6.7 “a great effort from the NetBeans team,” citing Hudson integration as his favorite feature. Finally, blogger Antony Du, a recent convert from Eclipse, explained his rationale for the switch: “[NetBeans] has all the languages I develop in on a daily basis built-in, offers additional services like connecting to databases...and most importantly it's still FREE.”

Tuesday Jul 07, 2009

At a Glance: Last Week's Developer Reviews


JavaFX
JavaFX received rave reviews for its usability, with one blogger proclaiming that JavaFX “really does a nice job of blending the timeframe based concepts of other programming environments into a nice declarative language.” According to blogger Pieter, developers are better off choosing JavaFX over Silverlight or Air because “it is the most logical step,” since the developer will already be used to the tools. Finally, blogger Jonathan Giles, a self-identified “UI geek,” tested out JavaFX and blogged about how to maintain consistent borders in JavaFX’s TextBox control.

OpenOffice
OpenOffice beat out the competition, receiving praise for being “functional, usable, and user-friendly” from Geek.com’s Rick Hodgin in his piece on a potential Office alternative from Cisco. A Rarst.net blogger described OpenOffice as “one of the open source flagships” and noted it has a “set of powerful functions and a company more than willing to support it.” Finally, in order to help readers get the most out of OpenOffice.org’s “many advanced features,” a blogger from Linux Beacon compiled an in-depth list of tips for Writer.

MySQL
MySQL won excellent feedback for a variety of features this week. One blogger liked the combination of PERL and MySQL, writing, “That's what the internet calls a 'win.'” He felt that the combination of PERL and MySQL was particularly “useful for reading hundreds of little text files and organizing them into one big data set.” Another blogger, who was troubleshooting a problem with Ubuntu, noted the high quality of MySQL’s test suite, which allowed him to easily identify the issue.

OpenSolaris
After a briefing with Sun Product Manager Larry Wake, InformationWeek’s Serdar Yegulap praised Sun’s strategic positioning around OpenSolaris as “the key element in a kick-butt application stack,” and felt that making Solaris open-source was a “big help” towards helping users get adjusted to a more rapid release cycle. Echoing Serdar’s positive review was blogger Bob Gourley, who switched to OpenSolaris in his home office and described the key benefits that led to his decision – security, cost, functionality, and fun.

NetBeans
A blogger from Mokblok kicked off the accolades for the new NetBeans 6.7, writing that “tight integration with Kenai and native Maven integration…really rock!” Another blogger also raved about native Maven integration and highlighted NetBeans’ efficient use of memory. Rounding out the cheers was a blogger who got hands-on with NetBeans writing, “The nice thing with NetBeans 6.7 and Maven, is that NetBeans modifies your maven project when you create a web service.”

Monday May 04, 2009

At a Glance: Last week's NetBeans, OpenOffice and MySQL reviews


NetBeans
Blogger Sean discovered the powerful profiling engine in NetBeans, which helped him understand the memory usage and consumption of each property, method call and object instant in his program. Programming Blogs posted about integration with Project Kenai in NetBeans 6.7 Beta. Another Programming Blogs writer said the NetBeans IDE provided a Web Services Manager that supported SaaS applications and it was much easier for Java developers to access all the popular SaaS services on the web. Blogger Carl McDade tried many of the FOSS IDE’s and editors and settled on NetBeans for erlang development, then provided instructions to set up NetBeans to get syntax highlighting and debugging with detailed explanations. NetBeans

OpenOffice.org
OpenOffice.org
The blogger at SoftSailor highlighted some of the program features in OpenOffice.org and says the “great advantage” of this suite is that the interface is similar to MS Office, which makes it easy for a user to “switch sides” without having to re-adapt to a completely different environment. Peter Jaques urged people to try OpenOffice.org because, “it's basically 99% compatible, and I bet you won't need Microsoft at all. Really!” Blogger Brendan Vittum wrote a tutorial on how to create a database shell in OpenOffice.org BASE, saying “users of all levels, novice, intermediate, or expert will find the collection of Wizards, Design Views, and straight SQL Views an intuitive means of creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports.”

MySQL
Despite some of the concerns floating around the MySQL Conference, Linux Magazine wrote there was good news coming out of the event. The article noted the MySQL developers stated they will return to a 'release early, release often' schedule, and the pending 5.4 release has a number of features worth keeping an eye on. A writer at the MySQL Performance Blog noted that he had a chance to take a look at TokuDB and run some benchmarks. The blogger reported that tuning TokuDB was much easier than InnoDB, and that there were only a few parameters to change. Core Security Patterns Weblog discussed how enabling SSL/TLS based MySQL connections ensure trusted communication between MySQL clients and the database server. MySQL

Tuesday Apr 21, 2009

MySQL 5.4 Announcement Details...

MySQL

Today we announced MySQL 5.4 at the seventh annual MySQL Conference and Expo. The new version is designed to deliver up to 90% faster response times and scalability. The InnoDB storage engine can now scale up to 16-way x86 servers and 64-way CMT servers.
Sun MySQL
Robin Schumacher, Director of Product Management for MySQL, joined me to discuss what is new and exciting in MySQL 5.4. Listen to the short segment below for the details.


Monday Apr 20, 2009

At a Glance: Last week's JavaFX, OpenSolaris and MySQL reviews


JavaFX
JavaFX continued its strong introduction to the developer blogs. IBM developer/blogger Bob Balfe called JavaFX the "most pervasive platform in the world," and discussed it being an Adobe Flash killer. He concluded saying, "I am sure we will be hearing more about JavaFX in the near future." The blogger from Softified gave a thorough introduction to JavaFX, as well as tips for downloading, coding, and sample applications.
JavaFX

OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris and ZFS received positive praise from bloggers this week. The blogger from Me, Myself and I said that the Solaris version of the Cg Toolkit was a "nice Solaris package" that worked "flawlessly" in OpenSolaris. He also noted he "can't wait for the native Skype port, especially for OpenSolaris." Blogger Teodor Milkov discussed operating systems supporting DTrace, highlighting Solaris and OpenSolaris. After installing he said that "everything was smooth... I was thinking about playing with ZFS these days anyway."

MySQL
MySQL use in the enterprise was the focus of a post from Enterprise Systems this week, discussing the scalability of MySQL for business use. Author Richard Cooley said that "MySQL is scalable if you look at the entire architecture and not just at the database tier," noting that prominent MySQL users include Yahoo, YouTube, AOL, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and WordPress. "If these companies can run portions of their companies on MySQL so can you."
Sun MySQL

Friday Feb 27, 2009

MySQL review in FriendFeed


As you know, social media content aggregator FriendFeed pulls together content from over 40 Websites like YouTube, Flickr, Twitter and more. Needless to say, the service manages a large quantity of information.
Sun MySQL
Today Bret Taylor -- the co-founder of FriendFeed -- has published a review of MySQL on his company blog stating, "We have optimized our primary indexes quite a bit in this new [MySQL] system, and we are quite pleased with the results."

The review has gotten attention from FriendFeed's strong advocates among the online/social media community. Robert Scoble already posted to Twitter about the post being included on top tech news aggregator Techmeme.

In the review, Bret described how the company looked to manage the rapid growth of content they're experiencing, with their service currently storing over 250 million entries as well as other comments and data.

Bret said that FriendFeed uses MySQL for storing all of this data, and the company was looking for ways to scale and manage indexes more quickly. Regarding background research, Bret said, "In the tests we read about and ran ourselves, none of the projects were stable or battle-tested enough for our needs... MySQL works. It doesn't corrupt data. Replication works. We understand its limitations already. We like MySQL for storage, just not RDBMS usage patterns." This lead the team to implement a "schema-less" storage system on top of MySQL rather than use a completely new storage system.

The majority of the review includes the actual high-level architecture FriendFeed employs, and follows with some graphical representation of the success they've seen. Bret said, "In particular, the latency of our system is now remarkably stable, even during peak mid-day hours."

In conclusion, Bret noted, "the system has been really easy to work with so far. We have already changed the indexes a couple of times since we deployed the system, and we have started converting some of our biggest MySQL tables to use this new scheme so we can change their structure more liberally going forward."

Tuesday Feb 17, 2009

MySQL wins Database of the Year 2008 award!!!


MySQL has been selected as the Database of the Year in the 2008 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards. MySQL got 58.10% of the total votes cast!!!

Congratulations, MySQL team!

MySQL Wins Award
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