Tuesday Dec 15, 2009

Petrobras Meets Oil Production Challenges with a Sun High Performance Computing Network



The BR Network is a high-performance computing initiative funded by Brazil's national oil company, Petróleo Brasilero, and is managed by an alliance of five federal universities to support the country's oil and gas industries. After the discovery of a vast new oil field off the coast of Brazil, the BR Network was selected to develop computer simulations to aid oil production at the new site, which is under approximately two miles of ocean floor riddled with geological faults.
Sun Customer BR Network
(Image courtesy: BR Network, a Petrobras initiative)
The Alberto Luiz Coimbra Institute-Graduate School and Research in Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro realized that the alliance of universities needed a high-performance computing grid to handle the complex new project that would be both an affordable and easily expandable solution over the next few years. Ultimately, the alliance selected Sun, which not only was the vendor that would best meet the performance, scalability, and energy efficiency goals, but also cost almost 30% less than the next closest offer from a competing vendor.

The new HPC solution includes 448 Sun Blade X6275 Server Modules with the new Intel Xeon processor series 5500, Sun Blade 6048 Modular Systems, and the Lustre File System. The solution also features the first blade server with on-board QDR InfiniBand for high performance and low latency. The alliance runs the Red Hat Linux OS on a Sun open-network solution, which supports multiple operating systems. The BR Network is currently running at three universities on a grid that provides approximately 100 teraflops of peak performance and 21.5 TB of memory.

The alliance expects that the BR Network will be fully operational by February 2010 with nearly 300 researchers working on the new clusters. Sun Professional Services is providing ongoing support for the project's air-conditioning and hi-visualization environments. The Sun solution more than doubles the universities' processing speed with ample room for growth. Alvaro Coutinho, a professor at the Center for Parallel Computing and Department of Civil Engineering, COPPE/UFRJ said: “We are very excited about the scalability of our Sun HPC system. We are currently at about 100 teraflops and we are thinking of doubling or even tripling it in the next two years.”

Check out the complete details here.

Tuesday Dec 08, 2009

Sun Ray thin clients help leading UK retailer to improve operations and reduce costs



Founded in 1979, ScrewFix is the leading tool, accessory, and hardware product supplier to both building professionals and DIY enthusiasts in the U.K. The company's original business model was based on high-volume catalog orders, but it now runs a substantial online operation in addition to its network of 143 trade outlets, delivering millions of products to customers every year.
Sun Customer ScrewFix
(Image courtesy: ScrewFix)
The ScrewFix contact center plays a critical role in daily operations, taking customer calls to place orders while also handling other customer inquiries including refunds and exchanges, using internally developed customer relationship management software. Until recently, contact center agents used the CRM system running on desktop PCs connected to the company's datacenter. However, slow system performance was making it increasingly difficult to respond quickly to customer inquiries. In 2008, as the PCs came to an end of their lifecycle, ScrewFix looked into an alternative solution with Sun.

Sun recommended a proof of concept using five Sun Ray 270 Virtual Display Client terminals that were deployed in different areas of the contact center, and ScrewFix reported that “the end-user response was impressive.” The proof of concept was enough to convince the ScrewFix IT team to deploy 350 Sun Ray 270 Virtual Display Client terminals to the entire contact center team, powered by 10 Sun Blade X6250 Server Modules residing in two Sun Blade 6000 Chassis. Six of the blades run Windows Server 2003 Terminal Services, while the other four run Sun Ray Software 4 on top of the Solaris 10 Operating System.

The new solution was installed overnight during one week to minimize disruption to employees and customers, and user migration to the new systems took place quickly. ScrewFix's server and storage team leader Peter Smith reports that because the technology is so easy to use, “for most people it was business as usual from the moment they switched on their new machine.” Additionally, ScrewFix employees are also saving time, with startup times up to 95% faster than the previous solution. The deployment of thin-client technology has also significantly lowered hardware total cost of ownership and made administration much simpler and less time consuming.

Check out the complete details, along with a podcast, here.

Friday Nov 20, 2009

Japanese Online Map Provider Improves User Experience with Sun Technology


Mapion Co. Ltd. is Japan's leading provider of online map services with more than 700,000 page views every day. The company offers the free Mapion online map search service for driving and public transportation routes; the fee-based service Mapion Mobile, which delivers navigation tools and directions to mobile phones; and the Mapion BB service for broadband users, that smoothly and instantaneously refreshes as the user navigates around the map.
Sun Customer Mapion
(Image courtesy: Mapion)
To remain competitive, Mapion must constantly innovate and improve the details in its maps and the services it provides and needs a stable system with minimal downtime and scalability to handle a large increase in users, without a deterioration in response time. In 2008, Mapion had to relocate its data center because of increasing power consumption needs, and saw the relocation as an opportunity to start a full-scale upgrade of the hardware, software, and operating system supporting its map information services.

Mapion chose to deploy the Solaris 10 Operating System along with Solaris Containers to ensure effective use of available resources for map image generation. Mapion also adopted the Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server as its application server, and the MySQL Cluster database as a real-time database for mission-critical applications for Mapion Mobile. Mapion standardized its hardware environment in its new data center on a Sun platform, deploying 18 Sun Fire X4150 servers, 3 Sun Blade 6000 modular systems, 3 Sun Blade X6250 servers, 1 Sun Blade T6320 server, and the Sun Storage Tek 9985V system for storage consolidation and virtualization.

Mapion also decided to renew its customer management system for Mapion Mobile, a system that needed to be available 24/7. Mapion adopted the MySQL Cluster Database because it allows for the availability of existing applications through its 'shared-nothing' distributed architecture with no single point of failure, to meet Mapion's mission-critical application requirements of 99.999% availability, which, coupled with automatic data partitioning with load balancing, allows almost unlimited database scalability for the company. The new customer management system for Mapion Mobile went live in January 2009, “with downtime reduced to near zero,” according to Koji Kozono, who works in the Technology Development Department, Service Development Group at Mapion.

By standardizing its IT infrastructure on a Sun platform, Mapion enjoys unified support from Sun Spectrum Support that keeps the operation running smoothly while substantially reducing costs that would arise from resolving problems. The Sun GlassFish Enterprise server has provided Mapion with a cost-effective platform for developing and delivering applications. Yukio Hasehawa, Manager of the Operational Technology Group, Mapion Technology Development Department, stated that switching to GlassFish resulted in a substantial reduction in the operational management workload and said: “It offers easy-to-use functions which are indispensable in day-to-day operations, including batch deployment to multiple application servers.”

Check out the complete details here.

Monday Nov 09, 2009

Canadian Province Speeds Up Application Deployment and Cuts IT Costs with Sun Server and Storage Solution


The Government of Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada offers services ranging from education and environmental protection, to public health, social services, and transportation to the province's 140,000 residents. In a move to improve these services while reducing IT costs, PEI consolidated all 12 individual department IT divisions into a single Information Technology Shared Services group in 2007. PEI then looked to simplify and standardize the heterogeneous IT department after finding there were 300 separate systems and more than 500 servers in 38 locations running on a variety of applications with no central or unified architecture.

Sun Customer Prince Edward Island Government
(Image courtesy: Govt. of PEI)
PEI, working with IT partners VisionQuest and Bulletproof Solutions, ultimately chose Sun hardware as the foundation of a new virtualized environment solution. The new solution includes a Sun Blade 6000 chassis with five Sun Blade X6250 Server Modules, each with two quad-core Intel Xeon Processors, running VMware Infrastructure 3 virtualization storage. The two-tier storage is based on the Sun StorageTek 6140 array, with Fibre Channel drives for high-performance storage and SATA-II drives for high capacity, and a Sun StorageTek SL48 Tape Library with two LTO 3 tape drives. The Sun servers and storage array are connected by Brocade Silkworm 200E SAN switches.

Sun Enterprise Installation and Implementation assisted with the deployment in July 2008, with VisionQuest hosting the virtual environment in a leased data center, and Bulletproof Solutions providing continuous technical support. The entire solution is backed by a SunSpectrum Support plan. The five Sun blades replaced 40 of PEI's existing physical servers, which is saving PEI approximately 58% a year on labor, support, power, cooling, and data center costs. Additionally, with a virtualized solution PEI will not have to purchase new physical servers, saving an additional $224,000 per year on acquisition costs, setup, and ongoing maintenance and support. PEI plans to increase the savings by adding more blades and eventually replacing as many physical servers as possible with virtual ones.

In addition to the cost savings, PEI has found that many IT tasks require less time and effort to include data backup and disaster recovery. PEI can also deploy new applications on its virtual servers in five to seven days, versus several weeks for physical servers – or even in minutes if the applications use a predefined server configuration. PEI has also achieved high system reliability with a 99.999% uptime. Chris Payne, director of infrastructure and IT Shared Services for PEI said: “With Sun's expertise and high-quality hardware, we reached our goal of building a platform that would run whatever applications we put on it and would be available for our clients 24/7.”

Check out the complete details here.

Monday Oct 19, 2009

City of San Antonio consolidates servers with Sun virtualization technology

The City of San Antonio, Texas (CoSA) is home to more than 1.5 million people, and provides multiple online services to its residents including bill payment, career assistance, licensing, permits, and public safety information. CoSA employees also rely on access to applications and data for use in daily work activities including financial systems, HR software, and public safety applications used by the police and fire departments.

Over time, the city's server infrastructure had struggled to keep pace with its service delivery, and CoSA was running out of room in its data center. The CoSA IT department needed to also upgrade its IT infrastructure to reduce maintenance costs and enhance services. CoSA already had a long-established relationship with Sun and felt that leveraging Sun's SPARC servers as a platform for the Solaris 10 Operating System and Solaris zones provided the best opportunity for ROI with its virtualization technologies and energy-efficient mainframe-class servers.
Sun Customer City of San Antonio
(Image courtesy: City of San Antonio)
The city, managing several separate environments, decided to consolidate its SAP NetWeaver systems on Sun SPARC Enterprise M5000 and M4000 servers. CoSA also migrated from the Solaris 9 OS to the Solaris 10 OS to take advantage of Solaris Zones and allow multiple applications to run in isolation from one another on the same physical hardware. The solution also includes Sun Blade 6000 Modular systems and multiple Sun Fire T2000 servers with energy-efficient CoolThreads technology. Finally, CoSA replaced 80 physical Windows servers with 12 Sun Fire X4600 M2 servers as a VMWare virtual infrastructure platform in its Windows environment.

Sun's server and virtualization solution allowed CoSA to consolidate from 16 to 4 racks of servers, and reduce the datacenter footprint for these workloads by over 85%. The solution has also helped CoSA reduce the maintenance overhead, giving administrators more time to deploy new systems that benefit the city and its residents. The consolidation has helped the city achieve considerable cost savings and CoSA expects to realize a full ROI within two and a half years based on the reduced support costs alone. Kevin Goodwin, the assistant director for CoSA IT department said: “Sun's enterprise-class virtualization technologies have served the City of San Antonio well. They're a critical component of our overall IT transformation and optimization strategy, allowing us to rapidly deploy highly available server capacity to meet the city's changing business needs while saving money in the process.”

Check out the complete details here.

Wednesday Sep 02, 2009

Public Utility Delivers Innovative Voice, Data, and Cable Services to 3,500 Customers with Sun Technologies

customer

In 2004, the cities of Monmouth and Independence, Oregon founded Monmouth Independence Network, or MINET, to deliver high-speed Internet, cable, and VoIP phone services to area businesses and residences, who were not scheduled to receive broadband services until 2015 or later. By the end of 2007, MINET needed to expand its IT architecture to support its growing customer base, and was also looking to offer additional services on its underutilized network bandwidth to increase revenue.
Sun Customer MINET
(Image courtesy: MINET)
Already a user of Sun technologies, MINET chose to expand its infrastructure with Sun hardware and software, and implemented the new solution in just 10 weeks. Three Sun Fire X4150 servers now handle the virtual PBX capabilities and run the Mitel Unified IP Client for Sun Ray Software. Virtual desktops, managed by Sun Secure Global Desktop Software, run on virtual servers set up with Solaris Containers or LDoms. All the virtual environments exist on a mix of 24 Sun Blade X6250 Server Modules and Sun Blade T6320 Server Modules, which are housed in a Sun Blade 6048 Chassis.

All of the company's services rely on a multi-tiered Open Storage solution. A Sun SPARC Enterprise T5240 server uses CMT to simultaneously process storage requests, and one Sun StorageTek 6540 array serves as a redundant controller. Data that is regularly accessed by services is stored on one Sun Fire X4540 server, while data that is not often accessed resides on two Sun Storage J4500 arrays. Solaris ZFS gives IT personnel the ability to manage and change the various storage components in a single pool without affecting availability.

The solution was fully deployed in April 2008 with the new architecture providing 99.99% availability or higher. Additionally, the virtual environments, Sun blade server modules, Solaris ZFS, and Open Storage solution have simplified the provisioning and modification of customer services and helped fuel a 10% growth in customers each month. The solution's small footprint and energy requirements have also helped MINET save 25% annually on power, cooling, and space requirements. Phil Garrett, General Manager of MINET said: “Our large power and cooling savings translates into more than just money savings, it also gives us more space that we can use to sell more services and generate additional revenue.”

Check out the complete details, including a podcast, here.

Thursday Jul 16, 2009

French company reduces costs with Sun open-source solution


Symeos, a Web services security startup based in France, provides online identity management and federated authentication services to organizations in Western Europe and the United States. Symeos offers innovative single sign-on technologies for customers across multiple industries, helping to protect organizations against e-commerce online scams and identity thefts.
Sun Customer Symeos
As the demand for increased security and online identity management and authentication solutions continued to increase, Symeos created a new identity management product called EGO. Symeos quickly needed a completely new virtualized platform to support the more than 10 million expected users of EGO. The company turned to Sun to provide a high performance, low energy consumption solution that was open source, fast, scalable, and secure.

Symeos ordered 8 Sun Blade T6340 Server Modules with UltraSPARC T2 Plus processors and 12 Sun Blade X6250 Server Modules with Intel Xeon processors. The company also purchased two Sun Blade 6000 Chassis to house the machines; and to protect the platform’s data, the company chose a Sun Storage 7410 Unified Storage System together with a Sun Storage J4000 Array. The infrastructure runs on the Solaris 10 and OpenSolaris Operating Systems. The blade servers provide support for Web solutions that include the Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server v3, the Sun GlassFish Web Space Server 10, and the open-source offerings of the MySQL Database, the Sun OpenDS directory server, and Sun OpenSSO Enterprise.

Symeos built the finished platform over a period of two months, and after testing, plans to launch the by the end of the year. Because Symeos used open-source and open-standard technology throughout, the business expects to lower future development costs by about 60%. Herve Prot, Chief Executive Officer of Symeos said: “With the support of Sun, we have developed a cost-effective identity management platform that offers customers 99.999% availability and is easily scalable.”

Check out the complete details here.

Thursday Jul 02, 2009

TravelMuse Saves $200,000 in Licensing and Cuts Hosting Costs by 50% with Sun Solution


TravelMuse.com is a Web site dedicated to providing inspiration and end-to-end tools for planning vacations. Visitors can book reservations and use collaboration tools to make plans with others. In 2007, looking to bring their product to market, TravelMuse began the search for a high-performance IT architecture that was highly available, affordable and flexible while supporting rapid growth, interacting with third-party services, and supporting content in multiple formats.
Sun Customer TravelMuse
TravelMuse wanted to use open-source software supported by a third party. The company decided to build its architecture with Sun technologies which initially included Sun servers, the Solaris 10 Operating System, GlassFish Enterprise Server Version 2, MySQL 5.0 Community Server, and Java EE 5. TravelMuse simplified its IT administration by using products from a single vendor while also taking advantage of the synergies that exist between Sun products.

TravelMuse engaged NaviSite to host its hardware architecture and set up five virtual servers with Solaris containers on a Sun Blade 8000 Modular System with Sun Blade X8400 server modules. TravelMuse also recently switched from its initial third-party database administrator to the MySQL Enterprise Platinum Edition with support services from Sun, a move that reduced DBA support costs by two-thirds.

TravelMuse's choice of an open-source software solution saves the company an estimated $200,000 in licensing costs each year, and reduces its hosting expenses by 50% with Solaris Containers. The infrastructure has maintained 99.9% availability while growing fivefold over the last six months. “The Solaris 10 OS and GlassFish Enterprise Server are very stable systems that basically don't go down,” says Cyril Bouteille, vice president of engineering at TravelMuse. “If any issue does occur, the Solaris 10 OS provides more troubleshooting tools than its competitors.”

Check out the complete details here.

Friday Jun 26, 2009

Sun solutions help German systems vendor deliver affordable cloud computing


Merkl IT was founded in 2007 as a traditional systems vendor offering IT services, hardware, software and support. The Munich-based systems vendor decided to pursue an idea for a cloud computing solution, which lead to the development of Virtual BackOffice, the company's core product.

Sun Customer Merkl IT
(Image courtesy: Merkl IT)
Virtual BackOffice provides businesses with access to a virtual IT infrastructure that is highly scalable, flexible, affordable, and available and gives them access to their data and applications from almost any location with very little required on-site hardware. To provide the scalability and fast response time needed to deploy Virtual BackOffice, Merkl IT needed new hardware and chose several Sun products for its solution.

For storage, Merkl IT uses Sun Storage Tek 2510 arrays with redundant iSCSI RAID controllers and 1 Gb/sec throughput. The SMI-S-compliant Sun StorageTek Common Array Manager software simplifies 2510 array storage management and allows Merkl IT to accelerate deployment and improve utilization. Citing Sun's “green IT” focus, Merkl IT chose Sun Blade 6000 servers with energy-saving features to virtualize and host Windows servers and desktops running Virtual BackOffice.

Merkl IT offers more than just hosting services, it also provides its customers with Sun Ray Thin Clients and software including Sun Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Sun Secure Global Desktop software. Merkl IT stays one step ahead of the major cloud computing providers by integrating its customers' local servers and network infrastructure into Virtual BackOffice.

Julian Merkl, co-founder and managing director of Merkl IT notes “the Sun infrastructure allows us to operate the cloud-computing solution in an energy-efficient and stable manner, saving our customers money and helping the environment.”

Check out the complete details here.

Sunday Mar 16, 2008

Customer of the Week: University of Wisconsin-Madison


The University of Wisconsin-Madison more than doubled compute power per square foot of datacenter floor space while increasing the compute power per CPU by replacing its legacy rack servers with Sun Blade 6000 servers.

"Everything about the Sun Blade 6000 system was just extremely easy and simpler than any product we've dealt with before," said David Parter, Associate Director of the University's Computer Systems Lab. "Anything that simplifies our physical management, inventory management, or even debugging and diagnosing node failures is a huge win for us."

Get the details here.
Sun Customer -- University of Wisconsin-Madison

(Image courtesy: University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Saturday Mar 01, 2008

Blogs of the week: OpenOffice.org, Solaris and more...


1. Taking a Bunch of Free Clip Art and Giving it to every User in OpenOffice.org -- OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas, 2/25
In this blog, Solveig Haugland discusses how IT administrators can download free clip art, assemble it, categorize it, and give it to every user to make OpenOffice.org more fun and usable. In terms of adding more themes or modifying existing themes, Solveig recommends copying those config files to the users' Gallery config directories. Then the user can just copy the clip art to the main clip art directory and expect the gallery to update itself.
OpenOffice.org

2. When Solaris Gets Desperate -- Blastwave, 2/26
Dennis Clarke discusses the functionality and durability of Solaris. He says Solaris will run perfectly with very little memory or resources for a long time. However, if you try to push its limits with "pathological load" and severe memory starvation then it will continue to run and also cease to respond in any reasonable fashion. He provides several examples and graphs to prove his theory including tracking CPU functioning percentages and minor page faults. After finishing his testing he comments that the machine is up and running just fine but the amount of free memory is still low.

3. Speeding up the Initial SMF Manifest Import -- Blog O'Matty, 2/20
   Creating ZFS File System during the Jumpstart Process -- Blog O'Matty, 2/25
In this first post, Ryan Matteson comments that it takes a bit of time for global and non-global zones to initialize after Solaris 10 is installed, mainly due to the fact that the initialization process is the initial manifest import. He then notes that Steve Peng just put back CR #6351623 (Initial manifest-import is slow) which provides some temporary relief to the problem, until there is a permanent solution. In the second post, he describes how he uses a jumpstart at home to update the hosts in his lab as new Nevada builds and Solaris updates are released. Because jumpstart doesn't have built-in support for creating ZFS file system, he added the Zpool and ZFS commands to his finish script. He shares the script with his readers and claims it "appears to work pretty well."

4. Sun continues the innovation of it's blade platform -- Blade Watch, 2/25
Martin MacLeod shares his enthusiasm toward Sun's announcement of its Four-Socket Intel Blade addition to the Sun Blade 8000 System. He mentions that by making the blade more scalable, there may be greater potential markets and opportunities for the blade platform. Martin ends his post by noting that "these Four-Socket blades might be great for virtualization or a grid application if the applications can utilize all four sockets or all the cores."

Thursday Sep 27, 2007

InfoWorld review: "Dynamite Comes in Small Packages"


Today InfoWorld featured a very positive review of the Sun Blade 6000, awarding it a score of 8.5 ("Very Good";) out of 10. The reviewer, Paul Venezia, evaluated the Sun Blade 8000 system last year and notes that the newer, scaled-down 6000 series "offers the greatest range of any blade chassis essentially because you can mix and match dual-socket Intel, AMD and single-socket SPARC-based blades in the same chassis."

Paul begins his review by detailing his extensive testing environment (a Sun Blade 6000 chassis with six blades, two Network Express Module and four dual-gigabit Express Modules, working with a variety of operating systems) and points out that JavaRConsole, is "simply stellar" and "works flawlessly." With regards to performance, he mentions he had a bad X6220 Opteron blade in the initial product shipment, but Sun worked to send him a replacement that worked just fine.

Overall, Paul's testing across three blade architectures showed "solid performance at every level," and he claims that the quad-core Intel Xeon-based blades are "obviously perfect for virtualization." While he'd like to see a refresh of the Sun blades with AMD's Barcelona and Intel's Harpertown-based Stoakley platform, he claims that "as far as what's available today, the price/performance mix delivered by the Sun Blade 6000 is outstanding."

Overall, a very positive review of the new Sun Blade 6000.
Sun Blade 6000 Server

Monday Jun 25, 2007

InfoWorld podcast on Sun blades and virtualization


Couple of months ago, InfoWorld was impressed with the Sun Blade 8000 Modular System offerings. Last week, they posted a follow-up podcast on our new Sun Blade 6000 Modular System offerings and how they are playing an important role in virtualization. Check out the review and the podcast.

Saturday Jun 16, 2007

My favorite ones from last week...


Selected Sun product conversations in blogosphere last week:

1. All Solaris Core Files Are Not Created Equally! - Blog O'Matty, 6/9
    Quieting The Shell During Login Sessions - Blog O'Matty, 6/9
Matty discusses the behavior of Solaris process.max-core-size resource control and a provides a tip on reducing the amount of "chatter" in login sessions.

2. The Magic Of Automounting User Home directories On Solaris - Cypro's Telephony, 6/10
Cypro discusses automounting home on a standalone box, to all boxes on a network and automounting global zone home to zones.

3. Solaris Live Upgrade On Sun Fire T1000/T2000 Servers - Martello, 6/11
Giving an overview of installing and configuring Live Upgrade on Solaris, James discusses the setup process, what did not work well and how he worked through issues.

5. More Information On Sun's New Blades - BladeWatch, 6/7
    Apple To Support ZFS? - BladeWatch, 6/7
    Sun Blades Greener? - BladeWatch, 6/7
Martin discusses several Sun-related topics including Sun's new blade range that "look fantastic," Apple's inclusion of ZFS in Mac OS 10 and the environmentally friendly aspects of Sun's blades.

6. New Blade Enclosure From Sun - Halis Way, 6/10
Hampus highlights the features of Sun's 6000 series servers saying "the cool thing about the 6000 enclosure is that it is not a Blade enclosure in the classic sense, it's not "stripped down computers in a box."

Saturday Mar 24, 2007

My favorite ones from last week...


Selected Sun product conversations in blogosphere last week:

1. Solaris 10 11/06 (Update 3) Review - Kaiwai's Blog, 3/16
Kaiwai provides step-by-step details on the installation and configuration of Solaris 10 11/06, and highlights the "degree of stability which one comes to expect from Solaris."

2. The Year Of OpenSolaris - eWEEK, 3/23
In discussing the likelihood of OpenSolaris pushing Linux aside in 2007, Jason highlights that OpenSolaris could thrive if more effort was pulled in for the software tools.

3. Projects In Solaris - my.tech.page, 3/20
Durga discusses how Solaris Projects are used to control resources used by processes and links to several documents from the Sun page for more information.

4. Installing Solaris 10 - Widen Your Unix Experience - TuxMachines.org, 3/17
Working often with Linux and Unix, this blogger plans to install the commercial version of Solaris 10 to take a look at Sun's Unix offering.

5. Measuring System Call Time With Procsystime - Blog O' Matty, 3/18
Matty highly recommends the DTraceToolkit, and describes how the procsystime script allows admins to analyze system call behavior.

6. Resolved: Vista Hesitation Signals Linux Opportunity - ZDNet, 3/20
Through a discussion of Microsoft Vista, Paul recommends that Linux, BSD and Solaris need to be considered alternatives to updating from XP to Vista, and recalls that Microsoft software can run under Linux and Solaris for x86.

7. Energy Rebates For Some Servers Make Big Savings? - Blade Watch, 3/16
Martin mentions Sun and PG&E's energy rebates that come with the T1000 and says, "If you're participating in a server upgrade project, choosing the right platform could reduce your project costs significantly with the rebate."

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