Mookajjiya Kanasugalu

(moo-ka-jji-ya ka-na-su-ga-Lu) Pulled out this book from our library last week to read on the way back to Bangalore. Not sure what prompted me to read this Kannada novel. It is either the series on television which discusses the life and memories of Shivaram Karanth or the recent stage adaption of this book.

I am dumb-founded by the ideas this novel illustrates. It gives insight into human evolution, faith and history that can never be gotten from text books. I had in the past read Karanth's article about God being a creation of man. This book, which won him the highest literary award in the land (JnanPeeth), contains illustrations of a lot more ideas. It broadens your perspective on human belief, history, religion, sex and behavior. It scientifically interprets religious practices and rituals, that may not sound sweet if you have strong sentiments about faith and God. (and may be that is the reason there does not seem to be an English translation yet!)

And what a good story teller he is. The story is set in a remote village in the west. A wise old lady Mookajji gets visions about what the village had witnessed through thousands of years of its history. Story rolls out like pieces of a jig saw puzzle which neatly fall into places as the story progresses and keeps your interest till the last line in the last chapter.
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