Solaris 11.3: rtc(1m) no longer warps the time by default

On x86 hardware Solaris derives the time-of-day from the "real-time-clock (RTC)"; traditionally, this clock is defined ticking in "local time".

 That has always been problematic when you have multiple OSes installed on the same hardware. All OSes will want to change RTC when they believe that we have just crossed one of the day-light-saving time boundaries. With Solaris 11's new boot environment, it is even a problem when you only have one OS installed but with multiple boot environments.  That is why Solaris 11 prefers to run the RTC in UTC so it never needs to be changed and all the boot environments are perfectly happy.

If you want to change the timezone for the RTC as recorded in /etc/rtc_config, you would use "rtc -z <timezone>"; unfortunately, the existing behavior was to warp the time. That was rather surprising as most of the time the system's time is properly set. This behavior has always annoyed me but it wasn't until some customer complained about this behavior in comp.unix.solaris that I realized that I wasn't the only person annoyed and so I decided to fix it.

In Solaris 11.3 rtc(1m) will no longer wrap the time.  If you really want to warp the time you will now need to use the new "-w" option.

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