Wednesday Jul 01, 2009

2 JavaOne Hands On Labs , Sun Technology Exchange, Java Technology Day Israel, and Java Day Turkey

jax

June: 2 JavaOne Hands On Labs , Sun Technology Exchange, Java Technology Day Israel, and Java Day Turkey  

I had a very busy June, I gave two Hands on Labs at JavaOne, two sessions at the Sun Technology Exchange, three sessions at Java Technology Day in Tel Aviv Israel, and one session at Java Day in Istanbul Turkey.

JavaOne Hands On Labs:

iguana.jpg iguana.jpg

I co-developed and delivered 2 Hands On Labs for JavaOne this year:

You can download these 2 HOLs documentation and code below:


Sun Technology Exchange:

iguana.jpg iguana.jpg
In Fort Lauderdale as part of the Sun Technology Exchange I gave two educational sessions to learn how:
  • JavaFX can help you build rich internet applications (RIAs) and includes the tools and platform SDK for developers, web developers, and designers to create dynamic applications.
  • GlassFish, an enterprise-quality Java EE 5 application server, offers advanced clustering, centralized administration, and best-in-class performance.
  • download the slides


Java Technology Day Israel

iguana.jpg iguana.jpgiguana.jpg
At the Java Technology Day in Israel I gave the following sessions:
  • WSIT Reliability Security and Transactions in Web Services
    • Metro is a high-performance, extensible, easy-to-use web service stack. You can use it for every type of web service, from simple to reliable, secured, and transacted web services that interoperate with .NET services. Metro bundles stable versions of the JAX-WS (Java API for XML Web Services) reference implementation and WSIT (Web Services Interoperability Technology). JAX-WS is a fundamental technology for developing SOAP-based and RESTful Java technology-based web services. WSIT enables secure, reliable interoperability between Java technology-based web services and Microsoft's Windows Communication Foundation.
    • you can download and try out WSIT in this JavaOne HOL: Metro: Try Out Simple and Interoperable Web Services and with these lab instructions.
    • You can read more about some of the example code for this session at
      GlassFish and MySQL, Part 3: Creating a Pet Catalog Web Service
  • MySQL for Developers
    • If you are a developer using MySQL, you should learn enough to take advantage of its strengths, because having an understanding of the database can help you develop better-performing applications. This session talks about MySQL database design and SQL tuning for developers.
    • download or view a screencast of this presentation
  • OpenESB and Connecting Enterprises
    • This session  explains and demonstrates several concrete technologies that make SOA architecture possible - BPEL (Business Process Execution Language), JBI (Java Business Integration) and OpenESB. The part of of BPEL starts with an explanation of the requirements of standardized business process language. The BPEL language is then described using an example. The relationship between BPEL and WSDL is also explained. Finally, BPEL designer and runtime that comes with NetBeans IDE is demonstrated using Travel reservation sample BPEL project. It also explains the motivation of the JBI and OpenESB as a standardized application integration framework in the same way J2EE architecture standardized how enterprise applications are built and deployed. Finally Sun's solution in SOA and application integration space is discussed. Whenever possible, concrete steps of building, deploying and testing SOA applications will be demonstrated step by step.
  • download the slides for all 3

Java Day Turkey

iguana.jpg iguana.jpg iguana.jpg
At the Java Day in Istanbul Turkey I gave the MySQL for Developers session again, see above for more information.




Friday May 01, 2009

Preview of 2 Hands On Labs I am working on for JavaOne


I'm Speaking At JavaOne

I'm working on 2 Hands On Labs for JavaOne this year:
  • Building RIA Dojo and JavaFX™ Pet Catalog Clients for MySQL™ backed RESTful Web Services
  • Developing Real-Time Revolutionary Web Applications, Using Comet and Ajax
You can read the HOL details and download some preview documentation and code below:
  • Session ID:       LAB-6771
  • Session Title:     Building RIA Dojo and JavaFX™ Pet Catalog Clients for MySQL™ backed RESTful Web Services
  • Session Abstract:
    • The goal of the Java™ API for RESTful Web Services (JAX-RS) is to provide a high-level declarative programming model for such services that is easy to use and encourages development according to REST tenets. Services built with this API are deployable with a variety of Web container technologies and benefit from built-in support for best-practice HTTP usage patterns and conventions.
      This Hands-on Lab provides an overview of the JAX-RS API and walks developers through the design process for a sample RESTful service.
      Dojo is an open-source DHTML toolkit written in the JavaScript™ programming language. The new JavaFX™ platform brings rich Internet applications to all the screens of your life.
      In the lab, participants will use the NetBeans™ IDE to rapidly develop JAX-RS, Dojo, and JavaFX applications and then deploy them on the GlassFish™ application server, with Java DB or the MySQL™ database.
  • Speakers:       Carol McDonald, Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Sridhar Reddy, Consultant

You can read more about some of the example code for this HOL at
GlassFish and MySQL, Part 4: Creating a RESTful Web Service and JavaFX Client

You can download a preview (some of the slides, docs, code) for this HOL at
Preview subset of slides, doc, code, for Building RIA Dojo and JavaFX™ Pet Catalog Clients for MySQL™ backed RESTful Web Services

  • Session ID:       LAB-5558
  • Session Title:     Developing Real-Time Revolutionary Web Applications, Using Comet and Ajax
  • Session Abstract:  
    • Join the asynchronous Web revolution! Emerging Ajax techniques -- variously called Ajax Push, Comet, and HTTP streaming -- are bringing revolutionary changes to Web application interactivity, moving the Web into the Participation Age. Because Ajax-based applications are almost becoming the de facto technology for designing Web-based applications, it is more and more important that such applications react on the fly, or in real time, to both client and server events. Aajx can be used to enable the browser to request information from the Web server but does not allow a server to push updates to a browser. Comet solves this problem. It is a technology that enables Web clients and Web servers to communicate asynchronously, enabling real-time operations and functions previously unheard of with traditional Web applications to approach the capabilities of desktop applications.
  • Speakers:       Justin Bolter, Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Doris Chen, Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Carol McDonald, Sun Microsystems, Inc.


You can read more about some of the example code for this HOL at
RESTful Web Services and Comet
You can download a preview (some of the slides, docs, code) for this HOL at
Preview subset of slides, doc, code, for Developing Real-Time Revolutionary Web Applications, Using Comet and Ajax

Duke



Thursday Apr 16, 2009

Developing RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS, Netbeans, Glassfish and MySQL

Developing RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS, Netbeans, Glassfish and MySQL

Yesterday I gave a talk at a the Jacksonville Java Users Group (JAXJUG) on Developing RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS, Netbeans, Glassfish, and MySQL.
Jacksonville-Beach-Ocean-View.jpg


You can dowload the StarOffice presentation here

Developing RESTful Web Services with Netbeans and JAX-RS


Content:
Lightweight RESTful approaches have emerged as a popular alternative to SOAP-based technologies for deployment of services on the Internet.

The goal of the Java API for RESTful Web Services (JAX-RS) is to provide a high-level declarative programming model for such services that is easy to use and encourages development according to REST tenets. Services built with this API are deployable with a variety of Web container technologies and benefit from built-in support for best-practice HTTP usage patterns and conventions.

This talk will provides an overview of the design process for a sample RESTful Pet Catalog service using JAX-RS. It shows how to build 2 sample clients for the Pet Catalog service one using the dojo AJAX framework and one using JavaFX.


You can get more information here:

Here is a link to the PDF slides and recorded Webinar
Developing MySQL-Backed RESTful Web Services with Netbeans and JAX-RS

Here is a link to the Article
GlassFish and MySQL, Part 4: Creating a RESTful Web Service and JavaFX Client

Here is a link to the JavaFX code
RESTful Web Service and JavaFX client code

Here is a link to dojo client explanation and code
RESTful Web Service and dojo client explanation and code





Wednesday Mar 25, 2009

Developing MySQL-Backed Applications with Netbeans and Java RESTful Web Services

Yesterday I gave a webinar which talked about how to leverage the latest version of the Netbeans IDE to develop RESTful Web Services and clients deployed on Glassfish with MySQL. The talk gave an overview of the design process for a sample RESTful Pet Catalog service using JAX-R, and discussed how to build 3 sample clients for the Pet Catalog service,  one using the Dojo AJAX framework , one using Comet and one using JavaFX.

You can download the presentation  here:
Developing MySQL-Backed Applications with Netbeans and Java RESTful Web Services

you can watch  a 7 minute screencast on how to build a RESTful Pet Catalog using JAX-RS and dojo here

RESTful Pet Catalog screencast

You can read more about the example RESTful web service and the JavaFX client for the RESTful web service here:

Glassfish and MySQL part 4

You can read more about the Comet client for the RESTful web service here:
RESTful Web Services and Comet

You can read more about the dojo client for the RESTful web service here:
a RESTful Pet Catalog

JAX-RS provides a standardized API for building RESTful web services in Java. Central to the RESTful architecture is the concept of resources identified by universal resource identifiers (URIs). The API  provides a set of annotations which you can add to Plain Old Java Objects (POJOs)  to expose web resources identified by URIs

Dojo – An open-source DHTML toolkit written in JavaScript. The Dojo Toolkit includes many utilities that go beyond Ajax. For example, the dojox.comet module simplifies programming Comet applications.

Comet – Techniques that enable a server to push data to client browsers through an HTTP open line of communication.

Tuesday Mar 10, 2009

Glassfish, MySQL, REST, and JavaFX

This is the fourth article in a series of articles on GlassFish and MySQL.
In Part 4, you'll learn how to create a RESTful web service for the web
application. You'll also examine a JavaFX client for the RESTful web service. As
was the case for Part 3, the web service discussed in Part 4 uses GlassFish,
MySQL, and the Java Persistence API.

Glassfish and MySQL part 4

Saturday Feb 07, 2009

Pet Catalog : JavaFX Example Application


Pet Catalog Photos : JavaFX Example Application

Pet Catalog Photos is a simple JavaFX application that displays pet photos retrieved from a RESTful Pet Catalog app (implemented using JAX-RS) described in an earlier blog entry and in this screencast.  This JavaFX example is a modification of the Interesting Photos : JavaFX Example Application.

catalogclient.jpg


Understanding the Code


Code Sample from: main.fx

// Application User Interface
def stage = Stage {
    title: "Pet Catalog"
    resizable: false
    x: bind stageX with inverse
    y: bind stageY with inverse
    width: stageWidth
    height: stageHeight
    visible: true
    style: StageStyle.TRANSPARENT
    scene: Scene {
        content: Group {
            content: bind stageContent
            clip: Rectangle {
                width: stageWidth
                height: stageHeight
                arcWidth: 20
                arcHeight: 20
            }
        }
        fill: Color.TRANSPARENT
    }
}


Stage is the  top level container window required to display any visible JavaFX objects. The variables title, width and height define the the text that appears on the window's top border and its height and width.
The scene variable defines an instance of the Scene object literal, which sets the area in which you can place the JavaFX objects.
Scene is a drawing surface for graphical content and a container that holds the scene graph nodes. It can be added to Stage, and JavaFX renders everything on a scene.
The scene instance variable has a content variable that is used to hold JavaFX graphical elements and defines the graphical content of the application. Here the content consists of a Group Node . The Group Node has a  content variable which is a sequence of child Nodes that will be rendered in order whenever this Group is rendered. The Group Node has a clip variable which specifies a Rectangle which defines the the clipping shape for this Group Node.

stage5_1_1_1.JPG

The Group Node content variable has a data binding  with stageContent.  Data binding allows creating a direct and immediate relationship between two variables or between a variable and the outcome of a function or an expression.   stageContent  is a sequence of Nodes as shown in the code below.  Node - is an element in a scene graph. The following visual objects are examples of javafx.scene.Node implementations: javafx.scene.image.ImageView, javafx.scene.media.Mediaview, javafx.ext.swing.\*, javafx.scene.shape.\*, and javafx.scene.text.Text. These are leaf nodes, which cannot have a child element.

Code Sample from: main.fx

// Application User Interface
var stageContent: Node[];

stageContent = [
        bgImage, titleBar, nextButton, backButton, closeButton,
        titleText, statusText, thumbImageViewGroup, fullImageView
];

stage4.gif
A grid of ImageView is added to Scene of Stage.

The thumbImageViewGroup variable has a data binding  with thumbImageViews which is a sequence of ThumbImageView which extends ImageView. ImageView is a Node used for painting images loaded with Image class.  The code below shows how the  thumbImageViews sequence is initialized to a  grid of  3 columns and 3 rows of  ThumbImageView .

Code Sample from:  main.fx

var thumbImageViews: ThumbImageView[]; // Thumbnail images
for(col in [0..2]) {
    for(row in [0..2]) {
        def thumbImageView = ThumbImageView {
            x: thumbBaseX + (col \* (thumbSize + thumbSpace))
            y: thumbBaseY + (row \* (thumbSize + thumbSpace))
            fitWidth: thumbSize
            fitHeight: thumbSize
        }
        insert thumbImageView into thumbImageViews;
    }
}
var thumbImageViewGroup = Group {
    content: bind thumbImageViews
}


calling the RESTful  Pet Catalog Web Service 


Information and URLs for pet photos is obtained by performing an HTTP GET request on a RESTful Catalog service by using the JavaFX asynchronous HTTP API (javafx.io.http.HttpRequest).  HttpRequest allows one to specify a location and method and start a HTTP operation with the function enqueue().  The content of the HTTP response can be accessed in the onInput callback function. onInput calls the PhotoPullParser.parse function to parse the XML.The onDone Callback is invoked when the request has finished execution, onDone calls the updateImages() function, explained later, which updates the images displayed in the Photo-Grid. 


Code Sample from: main.fx

function loadImageMetadata() {
    var start=page \* 9;  
    var request: HttpRequest = HttpRequest {

        location: "http://localhost:8080/catalog/resources/items/?start={start}&max=9"
        method: HttpRequest.GET

        onInput: function(input: java.io.InputStream) {                            
             var parser = PhotoPullParser{};
             photos = parser.parse(input);    
        }

        onDone: function() {
             updateImages();
        }
    }
    request.enqueue();
}


The response XML document contains a list of information about available photos. The document contains the following information about each photo:

  • id
  • imagethumburl
  • imageurl
  • server
  • name
  • price
  • productid
  • description
Here is example XML returned from the RESTFul Catalog Service:

 <items uri="http://localhost:8080/catalog/resources/items/">
       <item uri="http://localhost:8080/catalog/resources/items/1/">
           <description>This black and white colored cat is super friendly./description>
           <id>1</id>
           <imagethumburl>http://localhost:8080/catalog/images/anthony-s.jpg</imagethumburl>
           <imageurl>http://localhost:8080/catalog/images/anthony.jpg</imageurl>
           <name>Friendly Cat</name>
           <price>307.10</price>
           <productid>feline01</productid>
       </item>
   ...
   </items>


The response document is parsed by using the JavaFX XML pull parser (javafx.data.pull.PullParser) to extract information about the photos.
The parser supplies a sequence of Events as it process the document under application control. XML and JSON are the two data formats currently supported.  The PullParser can be used with the onEvent callback, which reports the current parse event.  The onEvent callback shown below parses the xml item elements into an instance of the Photo class. When the item END_ELEMENT , </item>, is reached,  the photo
variable is inserted into the photos sequence.

Code Sample from: PhotoPullParser.fx
import javafx.data.pull.PullParser;

public class PhotoPullParser {

  public function parse(input: InputStream): Photo[] {

    // Information about all catalog photos
    var photos: Photo[];
    var photo: Photo;

    // Parse the input data (Photo Metadata) and construct Photo instance
    def parser = PullParser {

        input: input

        onEvent: function(event: Event) {
            if (event.type == PullParser.START_ELEMENT) {
                if(event.qname.name == "item" and event.level == 1) {
                    photo = Photo { };
                }
            } else
            if (event.type == PullParser.END_ELEMENT) {
                if(event.qname.name == "item" and event.level == 1) {
                   insert photo into photos;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "id" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.id = event.text;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "name" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.name = event.text;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "imagethumburl" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.imagethumburl = event.text;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "imageurl" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.imageurl = event.text;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "description" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.description = event.text;
                } else
                if(event.qname.name == "productid" and event.level == 2) {
                    photo.productid = event.text;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    parser.parse();
    return photos;
  }
}

A sequence of photo objects is constructed by parsing the response XML.

Code Sample from: Photo.fx

public class Photo {
    public var id: String;
    public var imagethumburl: String;
    public var imageurl: String;
    public var name: String;
    public var price: String;
    public var description: String;
    public var productid: String;
}



The onDone Callback is invoked when the HttpRequest has finished execution, onDone calls the updateImages() function, shown below.


Code Sample from:  main.fx

// Load image and data specified in given Photo object
function loadImage(photo: Photo, thumbImageView: ThumbImageView): Void {
    thumbImageView.image = Image {
        url: "{photo.imagethumburl}";
        width: thumbSize
        height: thumbSize
        backgroundLoading: true
        placeholder: thumbImageView.image
    };
    thumbImageView.photo = photo;

// Update images displayed in Photo-Grid
function updateImages() {
    for(i in [0..8]) {
        var photoIndex = i;
        loadImage(photos[photoIndex], thumbImageViews[i]);
    }
}

updateImages updates the images displayed in the thumbImageViewGroup by  updating the thumbImageView Image URLs to the photo URLs parsed from the HTTP response. The photos are then fetched and displayed in Stage as a grid. The imagethumburl , imageurl are used to retrieve and then display photos. The ImageView class knows how to retrieve the image using the URL and display it. Once the photo is retrieved, it is displayed in Scene of Stage through the use of data binding.


If the user clicks a thumb photo, the normal photo is loaded and shown.

catalogclientlarge.jpg


When the user clicks a thumb photo, the ThumbImageView onMouseClicked function sets the fullImageView url to the clicked photo's larger image url and sets the fullImageView show variable to true.


Code Sample from:  main.fx

// Initialize fullscreen ImageView
var fullImageView = FullImageView {
    translateX: thumbBaseX
    translateY: thumbBaseY
    visible: false
}

// To display thumb image
class ThumbImageView extends ImageView {

    public override var onMouseClicked = function(e:MouseEvent) {   
      // Load larger image
      fullImageView.image = Image {
         url: "{photo.imageurl}"
         placeholder: image
         backgroundLoading: true
       };
    }  
    fullImageView.show = true;
}

When the fullImageView show variable is set to true, The FullImageView Node's  visible variable is set to true which specifies that this Node and any subnodes should be rendered as part of the scene graph. The  fader() function causes the fullImageView to fade in or out. The FullImageView Node's  opacity variable specifies how opaque (that is, solid) the Node appears. Animation occurs along a timeline, represented by a javafx.animation.Timeline object. Each timeline contains one or more key frames, represented by javafx.animation.KeyFrame objects. The value of the time instance variable, 3s, defines the elapsed time at which the values within the key frame will be set in a single cycle of the Timeline object. The play() method plays the timeline as defined.


Code Sample from:  FullImageView.fx

public class FullImageView extends ImageView {

    public var show = false on replace {
        if(useEffects) {
            fader();
        } else {
visible = show;
        }
    }
    var timeline:Timeline = Timeline {
        rate: bind timelineRate with inverse
        keyFrames: [
            KeyFrame {
                time: 3s
                values: [ opacity => 1.0 tween Interpolator.LINEAR ]
            }
        ]
    };
    function fader() {    
        if(show) {
            timeline.time = 0s;
            timelineRate = 1.0;
opacity = 0.0;
visible = true;
        } else {
            timeline.time = 3s;
            timelineRate = -3.0;
opacity = 1.0;
        }   
        timeline.play();
    }


stage4.gif

Clicking the normal photo again restores the thumb photo grid. The user can navigate to the next or previous set of photos by clicking << and >> arrow buttons.  Clicking the nextButton calls the onNext() function which increments the page number and calls loadImageMetadata();

Code Sample from:  main.fx

// Display next set of photos
var nextButton = ImageButton {
    selectImage: Image {
        url: "{__DIR__}images/next_h.png"
    };        
    onMouseClicked: function(e) {
onNext();
    }
}

// Load image and data specified in given Photo object
function onNext() {
    fullImageView.show = false;
    page++;
    //updateImages();
    loadImageMetadata();
}


Running the code

Netbeans 6.5 has plugins for JavaFX.  If  you don't have Netbeans 6.5  download and install it, then  go to Tools..Plugins and select the JavaFX plugins.  You can also download the JavaFX SDK without Netbeans, but I'm going to focus on using JavaFX with Netbeans.
To start learning JavaFX  you can start off with the doc Creating Your First JavaFX Application and/or with the tutorial  Learning the JavaFX Script Programming Language.

Running the RESTful Catalog service

  1. Download the sample code and extract its contents. You should now see the newly extracted directory as <sample_install_dir>/catalog, where <sample_install_dir> is the directory where you unzipped the sample package. For example, if you extracted the contents to C:\\ on a Windows machine, then your newly created directory should be at C:\\catalog.
  2. Start NetBeans IDE. Click Open Project in the File menu and select the catalog directory you just unzipped.
  3. Start the MySQL or JavaDB database as follows:
    • Click the Services tab in the NetBeans IDE.
    • Expand the databases node. You should see the MySQL server or JavaDB database in the list of databases.
      databaselist.jpg
    • Right-mouse click on the MySQL or JavaDB server database and select Start.
  4. Create the catalog database as follows:
    • Right-mouse click on the MySQL or JavaDB server database and select Create Database.
    • Enter the database name petcatalog and userid root and password admin. This will open a New Database Connection window. Click O.K. to accept the displayed settings.
  5. Create the tables in the MySQL catalog database as follows:
    • Expand the Drivers node. You should see a driver for the petcatalog database in the list of drivers.
      driverlist.jpg
    • Right-mouse click on the petcatalog driver and select Connect.
    • Right-mouse click on the petcatalog driver and select Execute Command. This will open up a SQL command window.
    • Copy the contents of the catalog.sql file in the catalog directory and paste the contents into the SQL command window.
    • Click the Run SQL icon runsql.jpg (Ctrl+Shift+E) above the SQL command window.
    • Open the  catalog/setup/sun-resources.xml file and verify that the property values it specifies match those of the database you created (jndi datasource, username, password...). For example
      <resources>
        <jdbc-resource  jndi-name="catalog" />
          <property name="User" value="root"/>
          <property name="Password" value="admin"/>
          <property name="serverName" value="localhost"/>
          <property name="portNumber" value="3306"/>
          <property name="databaseName" value="petcatalog"/>
          <property name="URL" value="jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/petcatalog"/>
      </resources> 
      Edit the property values as necessary to match the database you created .
  6. Build the project as follows:

    • Right click the catalog node in the Projects window.
    • Select Clean and Build Project.

  7. Run the project as follows:

    • Right click the catalog node in the Projects window.
    • Select Run Project.
When you run the project, your browser should display and empty html page at http://localhost:8080/catalog/  (this is the service not the client).

Running the JavaFX Pet Catalog Client

  1. Download the sample code and extract its contents. You should now see the newly extracted directory as <sample_install_dir>/catalog, where <sample_install_dir> is the directory where you unzipped the sample package. For example, if you extracted the contents to C:\\ on a Windows machine, then your newly created directory should be at C:\\catalogclient.
  2. In NetBeans IDE, click Open Project in the File menu and select the catalogclient directory you just unzipped.
  3. Run the project as follows:
    • Right click the catalogclient  node in the Projects window.
    • Select Run Project.
When you run the project, your browser should display the Pet Catalog Client.

References



Friday Dec 05, 2008

JavaFX RESTful Pet Catalog Client

Pet Catalog Photos : JavaFX Example Application

Pet Catalog Photos is a simple JavaFX application that displays pet photos retrieved from a RESTful Pet Catalog app (implemented using JAX-RS) described in an earlier blog entry and in this screencast.  This JavaFX example is a modification of the Interesting Photos : JavaFX Example Application.

catalogclient.jpg


Understanding the Code

Information and URLs for pet photos is obtained by performing an HTTP GET request  on a RESTful Catalog service by using the JavaFX asynchronous HTTP API (javafx.io.http.HttpRequest). The response document is parsed by using the JavaFX XML pull parser (javafx.data.pull.PullParser) to extract information about the photos. The photos are then fetched and displayed in Stage as a grid. The user can click the thumb image to load the normal image. Clicking the normal image again returns the UI to thumb image view. 

The response XML document contains a list of information about available photos. The document contains the following information about each photo:

  • id
  • imagethumburl
  • imageurl
  • server
  • name
  • price
  • productid
  • description
Here is example XML returned from the RESTFul Catalog Service:
  
 <items uri="http://localhost:8080/catalog/resources/items/">
       <item uri="http://localhost:8080/catalog/resources/items/1/">
           <description>This black and white colored cat is super friendly./description>
           <id>1</id>
           <imagethumburl>http://localhost:8080/catalog/images/anthony-s.jpg</imagethumburl>
           <imageurl>http://localhost:8080/catalog/images/anthony.jpg</imageurl>
           <name>Friendly Cat</name>
           <price>307.10</price>
           <productid>feline01</productid>
       </item>
   ...
   </items>

The imagethumburl , imageurl are used to retrieve and then display photos. The ImageView class knows how to retrieve the image using the URL and display it. Once the photo is retrieved, it is displayed in Scene of Stage through the use of data binding.

A sequence of photo objects is constructed by parsing the response XML. A grid of ImageView is added to Scene of Stage. If the user clicks this thumb photo, the normal photo is loaded and shown. Clicking the normal photo restores the thumb photo grid. The user can navigate to the next or previous set of photos by clicking << and >> arrow buttons.


Running the code

Netbeans 6.5 has plugins for JavaFX.  If  you don't have Netbeans 6.5  download and install it, then  go to Tools..Plugins and select the JavaFX plugins.  You can also download the JavaFX SDK without Netbeans, but I'm going to focus on using JavaFX with Netbeans.
To start learning JavaFX  you can start off with the doc Creating Your First JavaFX Application and/or with the tutorial  Learning the JavaFX Script Programming Language. 

Running the RESTful Catalog service

  1. Download the sample code and extract its contents. You should now see the newly extracted directory as <sample_install_dir>/catalog, where <sample_install_dir> is the directory where you unzipped the sample package. For example, if you extracted the contents to C:\\ on a Windows machine, then your newly created directory should be at C:\\catalog.
  2. Start NetBeans IDE. Click Open Project in the File menu and select the catalog directory you just unzipped.
  3. Start the MySQL database as follows:
    • Click the Services tab in the NetBeans IDE.
    • Expand the databases node. You should see the MySQL server database in the list of databases.  
      Database list
    • Right-mouse click on the MySQL server database and select Start.
  4. Create the catalog database as follows:
    • Right-mouse click on the MySQL server database and select Create Database.
    • Enter the database name catalog. This will open a New Database Connection window. Click O.K. to accept the displayed settings.
  5. Create the tables in the MySQL catalog database as follows:
    • Expand the Drivers node. You should a driver for the catalog database in the list of drivers.
      Driver list
    • Right-mouse click on the catalog driver and select Connect.
    • Right-mouse click on the catalog driver and select Execute Command. This will open up a SQL command window.
    • Copy the contents of the catalog.sql file in the catalog directory and paste the contents into the SQL command window.
    • Click the Run SQL icon Run SQL icon (Ctrl+Shift+E) above the SQL command window.
    • Open the  catalog/setup/sun-resources.xml file and verify that the property values it specifies match those of the database you created (jndi datasource, username, password...). Edit the property values as necessary.
  6. Build the project as follows:

    • Right click the catalog node in the Projects window.
    • Select Clean and Build Project.

  7. Run the project as follows:

    • Right click the catalog node in the Projects window.
    • Select Run Project.
When you run the project, your browser should display and empty html page at http://localhost:8080/catalog/  (this is the service not the client).

Running the JavaFX Pet Catalog Client

  1. Download the sample code and extract its contents. You should now see the newly extracted directory as <sample_install_dir>/catalog, where <sample_install_dir> is the directory where you unzipped the sample package. For example, if you extracted the contents to C:\\ on a Windows machine, then your newly created directory should be at C:\\catalogclient.
  2. In NetBeans IDE, click Open Project in the File menu and select the catalogclient directory you just unzipped.
  3. Run the project as follows:
    • Right click the catalogclient  node in the Projects window.
    • Select Run Project.
When you run the project, your browser should display the Pet Catalog Client.

References


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