"bug buddy" is no friend of mine

In academia, when the name of a subject matter contains the word "science," it's a fair bet that there's little actual science involved, if any at all. It looks like a similar principle is involved with software: if it calls itself someone's "buddy," it's a fair bet that it's unfriendly.

This certainly applies to GNOME's "bug buddy." This utility intervenes on crash of a GNOME application, and tries its level best to format up a problem report. Unfortunately, its best just isn't anywhere near good enough in most cases, and by design it prevents a core dump from happening. That latter attribute means that it actually \*prevents\* someone from fixing the problem, as core dumps contain far more information than just the stack trace that "bug buddy" would have logged on its best day, and thus it annoys me to no end.

After much tinkering, I've found a way to turn this bit of nonsense off in Solaris when logging in via dtlogin. The environment for GNOME is set by /usr/dt/config/Xinitrc.jds. Fortunately, like all good X applications, it looks at /etc/dt/config first, so we can use this to set a new variable.

Create /etc/dt/config/Xinitrc.jds with this for contents:

#!/bin/sh
export GNOME_DISABLE_CRASH_DIALOG=1
exec /usr/dt/config/Xinitrc.jds "$@"
Mark the file as executable (chmod +x), and the problem is solved.

For gdm, it's sufficient to add this to /etc/profile:

GNOME_DISABLE_CRASH_DIALOG=1
export GNOME_DISABLE_CRASH_DIALOG
Unlike dtlogin, gdm reads /etc/profile by default.
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