Monday Mar 03, 2014

Migrating a Java EE App from GlassFish to WebLogic

WebLogic is Oracle's strategic application server for the Java EE Platform. Since Oracle decided to focus on it for commercial support, and decided to leave GlassFish free of any ties with commercial decisions, I decided to bring this type of content to help GlassFish customers as well users to experiment, try, and evaluate Oracle WebLogic 12c (Java EE 6 certified).



But before getting down to the migration part, first thing you should learn is How to Install WebLogic 12c. For this migration tutorial in a developer environment, we will be using the Developer installation, but for production environments, we recommend the Full installation.

Full Installation
For full installation that can be used either in a production environment or in a developer environment, download the WebLogic Generic Installer and follow the steps descriped in the documentation for 12.1.2 on how to install WebLogic.

The difference between full and dev, is that full is targeted for any environment, and dev is well, for developers only. Oracle always recommend the full installation, but usually and specially for Java EE applications in a dev environment, the Development installation is enough. The good thing about it is the download size: less than 200Mb, and still you also get Oracle Coherence to play with. By the way, there is no licensing requirements for development purposes (either full or dev install), because WebLogic (and other Oracle products) are free for developers.

Required software

For this series of Migrating from GlassFish to WebLogic, I will be using NetBeans 8.0, GlassFish 3.1.2.2Oracle JDK 7, Oracle MySQL Community 5.6, and WebLogic 12.1.2. So make sure you have that software (except WLS for now) installed and configured in your system.

Developer Installation of WebLogic 12c

Let's get started by first installing WebLogic 12c for Developers. Instructions here are for Linux, but it is not that much different for Windows or Mac.
  1. Download WebLogic 12c ZIP Distribution for Developers (latest version: 12.1.2)
  2. Unzip it somewhere, for example:
    $ unzip wls1212_dev.zip -d /opt
  3. Go into the newly created directory
    $ cd /opt/wls12120
  4. Let's unpack the JAR files that were optimally compressed with pack200
    $ sh configure.sh    // for Windows, call configure.cmd
  5. After the uncompression, configure script will ask you if you want to create a new domain. Say "yes" by pressing 'y', then [enter]
  6. Provide a username, a password, and then confirm again the password
  7. Wait for the domain to be created and started
In just a few minutes you will have WebLogic installed, configured, and running!

Test your WebLogic 12c Developer Installation

At this point, you should have a WebLogic domain configured, up, and running. You can access the Admin Web Console at the following URL: http://localhost:7001/console. It will ask for username/password you typed during install. Take a moment to explore the Admin Console. You can find more information at the official documentation for 12.1.2.

You may also find very useful to know you can manipulate all domain settings through the WebLogic Scripting Tool, a command-line interface for you to code in Python, and issue commands to view and edit all settings. In an upcoming version of WebLogic we will also provide a REST interface.

I will use WLST in the next posts in this series, so maybe you want to read more later.

How to Start/Stop WebLogic 12c

In order to start and stop correctly your WebLogic domain, you can either do that from an IDE such as NetBeans, or by running specific scripts. These scripts are located under the following path location:

/opt/wls12120/user_projects/domains/mydomain/bin
  • $ sh startWebLogic.sh
  • $ sh stopWebLogic.sh

The Beauty of Java EE 6

Now, instead of going through the process of creating a Java EE application, I coded a small application that covers a large set of Java EE 6 APIs and pushed it to this GitHub repository. It is an application using the following APIs:
  • CDI 1.0
  • JSF 2.1
  • Bean Validation 1.0
  • EJB 3.1
  • JPA 2.0
  • JAX-WS 2.2
  • JAXB 2.2
  • JAX-RS 1.1
The beauty of Java EE is that you will learn from this migration how good it is when you follow standards, and also the value of the platform. Simply put: we will migrate this application without touching any code. At least not for now. Let's first set some infrastructure requirements. For now, we must have a database.

JPA and Database setup

To facilitate things, and before you can run this application, make sure you have MySQL installed and running onlocalhost, and with a database named gf2wls with username/password gf2wls with all privileges. The project comes with a drop-and-create configuration when JPA (through EclipseLink) is initialized.

To setup this, connect as root to your local MySQL server and issue the following two commands:
  1. $ mysql -u root -p
  2. mysql> create database gf2wls;
  3. mysql> grant all privileges on gf2wls.* to gf2wls@localhost identified by 'gf2wls';
And you are set!

Import project to NetBeans, setup MySQL driver, and run it on GlassFish 3.1.2.2

Since this is an article about migrating from GlassFish to WebLogic, I will assume you know how to get this application running on GlassFish 3.1.2.2 from NetBeans. But I will provide some highlights to make it work smoothless.



In order for the @DataSourceDefinition entry inside class InitializeSampleDataSessionBean work fine and connect to your MySQL database in GlassFish, make sure you have copied MySQL JDBC Driver into glassfish3/glassfish/domains/domain/domain1/lib/ext/ of course, before starting it up. In WebLogic, you don't need to do this since MySQL Connector/J is already part of the default installation.

Download the project 'bookmark-javaee6' to your local machine by either cloning the GitHub repository locally, or by downloading the zip and extracting somewhere. This is an Apache Maven project, so don't worry about environment. Just make sure you have this project up and running on a GlassFish domain.

Import the project bookmark-javaee6 into your NetBeans environment. Right click on bookmark-javaee6 project and select Run. Test the application by going to http://localhost:8080/bookmark-javaee6.

You should by now looking at the following screen:


Test the Bookmark WebService with a simple client

The sample Bookmark application comes with a JAX-WS WebService.

  1. You can test this WebService in many ways, but I will give you three main options: one is to try SoapUI
  2. Another option is to right click on the WebService in NetBeans, and select Test WebService
  3. Last option is to run the bookmark-javaee6-wsclient that comes with JUnit Test Cases. 
Make your choice, and see it working!

Running the sample Java EE 6 application in WebLogic 12c

Before we go to a pure Maven description on how to do this, let's give NetBeans a try. Now that you have everything ready (a Java EE 6 application running on GlassFish 3.1.2.2), with source code as a Maven project in NetBeans, let's add WebLogic as a Server to it.

  1. Go to the Services tab in NetBeans, and right click in Servers, then select Add Server....
  2. Select Oracle WebLogic Server
  3. Insert the path location of your recently installed WebLogic server. Remember to select the subfolderwlserver. If you installed as described in the beginning, you should try /opt/wls12120/wlserver
  4. Type your username and password of your WebLogic domain
  5. Finish this wizard
Now we must change from GlassFish to WebLogic in Project Properties. Select bookmark-javaee6 project and right click on it. Go to Run and select your newly created WebLogic 12.1.2 server. Press OK. See the picture below to understand what has to be done:



Start your project by right clicking in it, and select Run! Test your application running on WebLogic by going to the following location: http://localhost:7001/bookmark-javaee6


In case you had any problem, try these two articles:


Success! You have now the same application running on WebLogic 12c! Without any code change!

WebLogic understands GlassFish Deployment Descriptor

I haven't mentioned this before because I wanted you to see the sample application up and running on WebLogic, but what you can do in this application is to remove src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/weblogic.xml, and change the context-root inside glassfish-web.xml. What will happened if you redeploy this application without weblogic.xml, is that the application will start just fine, but in a different context-root: the one you typed inside glassfish-web.xml.

The reason for this is well documented on Support for GlassFish Deployment Descriptors. Give it a look in case you want to know what else does WebLogic understands from GlassFish's DD.

Now, let's try something different. Let's now use pure Apache Maven to compile and run the application on your WebLogic installation! For that, we will first need to configure the plugin.

Configuring the WebLogic Development Maven Plugin

Before you can use the plugin, you must install it in your local or remote Maven repository. Feel free to follow official instructions for WebLogic 12.1.2. But in case you want to just get it done, here's the short version:

  1. Go to your WLS installation. It is probably located here:
    /opt/wls12120
  2. Now change to the following directory:
    $ cd oracle_common/plugins/maven/com/oracle/maven/oracle-maven-sync/12.1.2
  3. Issue the following command to sync WLS Maven Plugin into your local repository:
    $ mvn com.oracle.maven:oracle-maven-sync:push -Doracle-maven-sync.oracleHome=/opt/wls12120/oracle_home/.
You have now successfully installed WLS Maven Plugin. To validate the installation, type:
$ mvn help:describe -DgroupId=com.oracle.weblogic-DartifactId=weblogic-maven-plugin -Dversion=12.1.2-0-0

To continue, let's configure the plugin onto our bookmark-javaee6 sample application, and then deploy the package into WebLogic
  1. Open the POM file of bookmark-javaee6 project
  2. Uncomment the WebLogic Maven Plugin definition
  3. Make sure to enter the same username and password as your domain when you installed and configured WebLogic
  4. Make sure WebLogic is running
  5. Make sure there's no other bookmark-jaavaee6 project deployed on your WebLogic instance
  6. Execute the following command:
    $ mvn package pre-integration-test
  7. Check your logs and try http://localhost:7001/bookmark-javaee6!

Conclusion

As you could see, if you are working with a Java EE 6 project 100% standardized, and perhaps Maven, you will find no problems at migrating this project to WebLogic 12c. In fact, if you are using Maven it will be as simple as adding a new plugin just to facilitate deployment. But even this you won't have to do in case you have a binary only. Just open the Admin Web Console, and fire a deployment from there!

And by the way, WebLogic is not that heavyweight and unproductive application server developers thought it still is. For more information about Developer Productivity with WebLogic 12c, read my entry "WebLogic in Comparison: RebelLabs and the Java App Server Debate".

Caveats for Java EE projects, road ahead for migrations

In the next blog posts of this series, I will cover how to work around some common issues when your project is not exactly following, or taking advantage of all standards defined in the Java EE 6 platform, or simply using extra features, customizations of GlassFish.

Here's a sneak peek of what's coming next:
  • How to Migrate JDBC DataSources from GlassFish to WebLogic
  • How to Define, Deploy, and Use JMS resources
  • How to Migrate JMS resources from GlassFish to WebLogic
  • How to Add and Isolate (classpath of) 3rd-party libraries (for example PrimeFaces)
And many more things to come!
  • Applying a GlassFish Domain Topology to a WebLogic Domain (clustering, etc)
  • Migrating Security Realms
  • Migrating Custom Login Modules
If there's any other subject you'd like to see, please post a comment!

Cheers!

Thursday Nov 14, 2013

O futuro do WebLogic 12c

Antes de falar do WebLogic 12c, uma informação importante é que prorrogamos o suporte do WebLogic 11g (versão 10.3.6) até 2018, e o suporte estendido até 2021. Isto dará maior tranquilidade aos clientes a planejarem suas migrações, reduzindo assim riscos e custos, principalmente aos clientes de Fusion Apps e SOA Suite/BPM. 

A versão atual do WebLogic 12c é a 12.1.2, lançada este ano em Junho, juntamente com todo o Cloud Application Foundation 12c (Coherence, Oracle HTTP Server, Tuxedo, etc). A versão anterior 12.1.1 já era certificada em Java EE 6, e agora esta nova versão traz uma série de recursos e funcionalidades para integrar suas aplicações com o banco de dados Oracle 12c, facilitar o operacional através de Dynamic Clustering e Elastic JMS, mais otimizações para Exalogic e JMS, administração do Oracle Coherence pelo console administrativo do WebLogic, plugins para desenvolvimento de projetos com Apache Maven, geração automática de serviços REST para seus projetos JPA com o TopLink RESTful Data Services, e muito mais.

O WebLogic 12.1.2 também substituiu o antigo instalador da BEA e os utilitários de patch BSU com o Oracle Universal Installer e o utilitário opatch para a aplicação de patches. Muitos clientes Oracle já conhecem estas ferramentas, que já eram utilizadas para outros produtos, como o próprio Banco de Dados.

Ou seja, uma série de novidades que justificam a liderança do WebLogic no mercado de Application Servers. Mas ao olhar os próximos passos e o roadmap para as versões do WebLogic 12.1.3 e 12.1.4, há motivo de sobra para se interessar na versão 12c.

A versão WebLogic 12.1.3 deverá ser a primeira homologada para diversos produtos 12c do FMW como SOA Suite 12c. Além disso, alguns novos recursos serão incluídos para melhorar ainda mais a experiência do administrador de infraestrutura para escalar ambientes com mais servidores. Por exemplo, a feature de Elastic JMS permitirá o uso do Server Migration sem perder mensagens durante esta execução. Estamos trabalhando para oferecer na versão 12.1.4 o suporte para auto-scaling de clusters dinâmicos, com base em limites e métricas definidas pelo usuário. O WebLogic 12.1.4 também deverá ter uma API para controlar os clusters dinâmicos. Desta forma, os usuários poderão facilmente programar a hora de parar, iniciar ou remover nós de um cluster dinâmico.

O WebLogic 12c conta com o driver JDBC 12c, oferecendo melhor integração com o Oracle DB 12c, e uma destas features é chamada de "Application Continuity". Esta feature permite que após uma falha de comunicação com um nó de um Oracle RAC, a transação com o banco de dados seja transferida sem qualquer efeito colateral para outro nó do cluster, garantindo disponibilidade. Na versão WebLogic 12.1.4, será introduzido também um novo recurso chamado de Multitenant Applications. Desta forma usuários poderão definir um modelo WebLogic para uma aplicação, para um ou mais clientes desta aplicação, que terá o seu próprio cluster, etc.

O conteúdo acima foi originalmente postado aqui.

AVISO LEGAL: O texto acima visa delinear nossa direção geral dos produtos. Destina-se apenas para fins informativos, e não pode ser incorporado em qualquer contrato. Não é um compromisso e não deve ser usado na tomada de decisões de compra. O desenvolvimento, lançamento e tempo dos recursos ou funcionalidades descritos para os produtos da Oracle permanecem a critério exclusivo da Oracle.

Tuesday Jun 04, 2013

Promote Java EE 7 and GlassFish on your Twitter

The launch of Java EE 7 is right ahead. On June 12th we will hear from Oracle executives and evangelists what's all about the new version of the platform. The Live Webcast "Introducing Java EE 7" will have two sessions, and all you need to do to join us and watch Arun Gupta and others, is to go to this webpage and sign up. Also, don't forget to check GlassFish's blog, you know, because it's the reference implementation of Java EE! :-)

But if you really, really love Java EE and really, really want people to join us, why don't you also promote the launch on your Twitter account? Use this background image that fits very nice on your profile, and also don't forget to set the background color to #517E9C.

Let's Make The Future Java... Together!

Monday Apr 22, 2013

What's new in Java EE 7 at JUDCon Brazil 2013

This weekend I talked about Java EE 7 at JUDCon Brazil 2013, the session "What's new in Java EE 7? From HTML5 to JMS 2.0". What a great honour to be at JBoss Users and Developers Conference to share with attendees the great work that Oracle, Red Hat, and many others are doing for this platform. Room was packed, with people standing, and so much interest to hear all the cool stuff to come, such as WebSockets, JMS, JAX-RS, JSF and even more. To add some value to this talk, and as I'm a fan of Game of Thrones, I thought that a few images would fit right at this talk :-)


Slides here!

Friday Feb 22, 2013

[pt_BR] Encontro SouJava na Oracle do Brasil

No dia 21 de Fevereiro estreamos o novo escritório da Oracle abrindo as portas para o grupo de usuários do SouJava. Com a presença do Bruno Souza, Ricardo Ferreira, Edgar Silva, Vinicius Senger, Mauricio Leal e muitos outros, tivemos a participação ao todo de 26 pessoas.

Durante a reunião, apresentei As Novidades do JMS 2.0, parte importante do Java EE 7 e que teve votação do Public Review no dia 19/02. O SouJava votou a favor, não só pela qualidade mas também pela transparência da especificação.

A outra apresentação foi do Ricardo Ferreira, falando sobre Processamento de Dados em Memória usando Elastic Data Grid (In-Memory Computing), que demonstrou a importância do uso de cache distribuído em arquiteturas altamente escaláveis, com o Oracle Coherence.

No final, os participantes conheceram o novo escritório da Oracle e ainda foram muito bem recebidos com muita pizza.
Confira todas as fotos do evento!

 Obrigado a todos que participaram!

Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

7 reasons you had to be at JavaOne Latin America 2012

Yesterday was 12/12/12, and everybody went crazy on Twitter with cool memes like this one. And maybe you are now wondering why I mentioned 7 (seven) on the blog title. Because I want to play numbers? Yes! Today is 7 days after JavaOne Latin America 2012 is over (... and I had to figure out an excuse for taking so long to blog about it...).

So unless you were at JavaOne Latin America this year, here are 7 things you missed:

  1. OTN Lounge mini-theatre
    There was a mini-theatre holding several lightning talks. We had people from SouJava JUG, GoJava JUG, Globalcode, and several other Java gurus and companies running demos, talks, and even more. For example, @drspockbr talked about the ScrumToys project, that demonstrates the power of JSF.



  2. Hands On Lab for JAX-RS and WebSockets
    One of the cool things to do during JavaOne is to come to these Hands On labs and really do something using new technologies with the help of experts. This one in particular, was covered by me, Arun Gupta, and Reza Rahman. The HOL had more people than laptops (and we had 48 laptops!) interested on understanding and learning about the new stuff that is coming within Java EE 7. Things like JAX-RS, Server-sent Events and WebSockets. Hey, if you want to try this HOL by yourself, it is available on Github, so go for it! If you have questions, just let me know!



  3. Java Community Keynote
    This keynote presented a lot of cool things like startups using Java in their projects, the Duke Awards, SouJava winning the JCP Outstanding Award, the Java Band, and even more! It was really a space where the Java community could present what they are doing and what they want to do. There's a lot of interest on the Adopt-a-JSR program and the Adopt-OpenJDK. There's also an Adopt-a-JavaEE-JSR program! Take a look if you want to participate and Make the Future Java.

    DSC_1572.JPG

  4. Java EE (JMS, JAX-RS) sessions from Reza Rahman, the HeavyMetal guy
    Reza is a well know professional and Java EE enthusiast from the communitty who just joined Oracle this year. His sessions were very well attended, perhaps because of a high interest on the new things coming to Java EE 7 like JMS 2.0 and JAX-RS 2.0. If you want to look at what he did at this JavaOne edition, read his blog post. By the way, if you like Java and heavymetal, you should follow him on Twitter as well! :-)

  5. Java EE (WebSockets, HTML5) sessions from Arun Gupta, the GlassFish guy
    If you don't know Arun Gupta, no worries. You will have time to know about him while you read his Java EE 6 Pocket Guide. Arun has been evangelizing Java EE for a long time, and is now spreading his word about the new upcoming version Java EE 7. He gave one talk about HTML5 Productivity on the Java EE 7 platform, and another one on building web apps with WebSockets. Pretty neat! Arun blogged about JavaOne Latin America as well. Read it here.

  6. Java Embedded and JavaFX
    If there are two things that are really trending in the Java World right now besides Java EE 7, certainly they are JavaFX and Java Embedded. There were 14 talks covering Java Embedded, from Java Cards to Raspberry.pi, from Java ME to Java on your TV with Ginga-J. The Internet of Things is becoming true, and Java is the only platform today that can connect it all in an standardized and concise way. JavaFX gained a lot of attention too. There were 8 sessions covering what the platform has to offer in terms of Rich User Experience. The JavaFX Scene Builder is an awesome tool to start playing designing an UI, and coding for JavaFX is like coding Swing with 8 hands, one holding your coffee cup. You can achieve a lot, with your two hands (unless, you really have 8 hands, then you can achieve 4 times more :-). If you want to read more about JavaFX, go to Stephen Chin's blog post.

    DSC_1533.JPG

  7. GlassFish and Friends Party, 1st edition at JavaOne Lating America
    This is probably the thing that I'm most proud. We brought to Brasil the tradition of holding a happy hour for all GlassFish, Java EE friends. This party started almost 7 years ago in San Francisco, and it was about time to bring it to Brazil! The party happened on Tuesday night, right after JavaOne General Keynote, at the Tribeca Pub. We had about 80 attendees and met a lot of Java EE developers there! People from JUGs, Oracle, Locaweb and Red Hat showed up too, including some execs from Oracle that didn't resist and could not miss a party like this one.

    Lots of caipirinhas, beer and food to everyone, some cool music... even The Fish walking around the party with Juggy!



    You can see more photos from the party on an album I shared with the recently created GlassFish Brasil community on Google+ here (but you may be more interested in joining the GlassFish english community). There's also more pictures that Arun took and shared on this link.

So now you may want to consider coming to Brazil next year! Java EE 7 is on its way, and Brazil is happily and patiently waiting for it, with a lot of enthusiasm.

By the way, GlassFish and Java EE 6 just celebrated a Happy Birthday!

About


Bruno has been having fun working with Java since 2000 and now helps Oracle on sharing the technology accross all Latin America. Also plays videogames, does trekking and loves beer.

Follow me on Twitter! @brunoborges

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