Thursday Jan 28, 2010

The Oracle acquisition of Sun is complete - New Opportunities

I'm absolutely excited that Oracle has completed the acquisition of Sun Microsystems, Inc. No other enterprise software company is better suited to leverage the large suite of Sun technology than Oracle.

Acquisitions of this magnitude require changes as well as new beginnings.

I've concluded the timing is right for me and I will be leaving Oracle/Sun.

I will certainly miss the many talented people at both Sun and Oracle.

Just as in Major League Baseball; inevitably most players and coaches move among teams to compete and work for the betterment of the industry.

I wish the best of luck to the new Oracle and my many colleagues there.  My personal thanks to each and every team member of mine over the years at Sun.

I plan to continue with my blog which has been migrated in its entirety to http:\\\\bobporras.wordpress.com\\

You can also subscribe to my WordPress RSS blog feed by clicking on the orange icon to the left.

Click here to go to my WordPress blog page and sign up for email delivery (at the blog page scroll down and look to the right for EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION and follow the directions).

I can be contacted via LinkedIn, Facebook or bob.porras@gmail.com

Enjoy.

The views expressed on this [blog; Web site] are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.

Wednesday Nov 18, 2009

IT Infrastructure Products, Partnerships and Paraphernalia

Announcements have certainly accelerated lately with respect to integrated infrastructure technology.  Multiple vendors who provide infrastructure hardware for compute, storage and network are either partnering with each other or pursuing a "go alone" strategy.  Few will disagree that more tightly integrated solutions will benefit IT customers.

However an IT solution has always had the expectation and requirement to be integrated.  That is why the IT industry has developed over the years standards and protocols.  In other words, common industry accepted methods to move, process and protect business as well as consumer information.  Traditionally large complex IT solutions have been integrated by VARs, management consulting firms or consulting services for a given customer.  Is that beginning to change?  Also the IT solution is comprised of more than just tightly integrated hardware blocks. 

Let's not forget about the various applications that need to run on any given vendors hardware platform.  In addition to the applications, virtualization is becoming a standard requirement to maximize the utilization of any vendors integrated hardware platform.  Infrastructure providers will need to adjust to the fact that hypervisor technology may sell less hardware because utilization and efficiency will be largely improved.

Does this new focus on consolidation favor software stacks that are both heterogeneous and therefore ubiquitous?  The IT industry has become a mature business.  New ideas will always continue but IT will still be comprised of both hardware and software. 

A good analogy is the automobile industry...  Automobiles have had tremendous amounts of progress over the past 100 years.  For example there have been many optimizations and efficiencies with car manufacturing, car fuel efficiency, etc.  Over the past 20 years the automobile industry has highly leveraged the use of embedded electronics in cars.  But the basic components of a car (tires, engine, brakes, steering wheel, etc.) have (and for the foreseeable future) not changed.

Blog is available also at: http://bobporras.wordpress.com/

Wednesday Oct 21, 2009

Around Oracle Open World in less than 180 hours

The turnout of customers and partners of the enterprise technology segment certainly did not disappoint at Oracle Open World this year.  While other large IT events have been canceled this year do to the economic downturn, Oracle Open World attendance of 42000 IT professionals was basically unaffected from the 2008 attendance.  Even more impressive was that virtually every enterprise vendor that partners, competes and analyzes Oracle attended this yearly gathering in downtown San Francisco. The multiple exhibit halls, sessions, events, activities and networking certainly created an environment for plenty of information exchange.

Every vendor at Oracle Open World is a cog (of varying sizes from small to large) that builds into the enterprise IT stack of:

  • applications
  • middleware
  • database

Every item from storage management, computational speeds, networking feeds, disaster recovery, hosted IT, employee productivity tools and various communication mediums all factor back into connecting the above 3 areas of the enterprise stack.

In my opinion enterprise IT is becoming much less driven by vendor loyalty and a great price to the vendors that can provide competitive advantage to their customers.  During an economic downturn as well as post recovery, the competitive advantage will more than outshine a good price.

Blog is available also at: http://bobporras.wordpress.com/

Monday Aug 17, 2009

Use all the Tools in the Tool Box...

Ultimately it is the software application that most IT customers look toward solving their business problems.  However software applications have a lot of moving parts sitting logically under the stack that enables the given application.  Some of these parts include operating system components, hardware and usually a large amounts of data.

A car, like an IT solution, requires more than a few set of tools to complete the job. While companies share many common problems, as do car manufactures, company solutions ultimately need the entire tool box to be fully utilized.  This is necessary in order to get the right solution to a company's IT problem.

Healthy competition amongst vendors enables multiple degrees of freedom for application solutions, but more technologies in a given vendors tool box only enables the ability to build better IT solutions.  The same applies to those who are in the business of building cars.  From a business perspective it is absolutely critical that the technologies have to be articulated into a cohesive and complementary strategy for success.  For example Ford builds cars, trucks and hybrids.  Ford does not depend on putting a truck engine into a Ford Focus and vice versa for obvious reasons.  The same applies for technology.  No "one solution fits all" has ever been successful in any market. 

Venture Capitalists and public companies have been chasing "the" goal for many years that one given technology can satisfy all aspects of a given marketHowever when you combine and use multiple technologies in your portfolio and present the right business and sales focus the results can be pretty awesome.

Here is a good example of software technologies:

from the tool box combined with partner technology to produce an ultimate software application solution.

Blog is available also at: http://bobporras.wordpress.com/

Thursday May 29, 2008

Open HA Cluster<-->Open HA Cluster

Another 2 million lines of source code contribution completed to the opensolaris.org community-- 6 months ahead of schedule.  Open HA Cluster is the source code, automated test suite, documentation and community for the Solaris Cluster Framework.  While a few agents and some encumbered code fragments are not being released, you are able to build a fully functional high availability cluster from the source code. With this release, users can develop and customize more complete, complex and sophisticated open-sourced business continuity and disaster recovery solutions. Included as well is integration with key applications such as Apache, Apache Tomcat, MySQL, PostgreSQL, DNS, NFS, Grid Engine, Glassfish, Samba, Kerberos and more. Even better you have the opportunity to contribute, modify, enhance and experiment as part of the community. 

This latest contribution follows the Solaris Cluster Agents in June 2007, the Solaris Cluster Geographic Edition in December 2007 and our most recent May 2008 source code.  Click the blueprint on the left for a simple cluster set up and configuration.

Ian Murdock is doing a keynote at LinuxTag 2008 in Berlin featuring Open HA Cluster, followed by a demo by Eve Kleinknecht.  Listen to Barton George and his podcast with Meenakshi Kaul-Basu about the whole enchilada.  Also a shout out to Thorsten Frueauf, Hartmut Streppel, Nick Solter, Amour Kwok, Jeff Osteen, Ashutosh Tripathi, Bonnie Corwin and the OpenSolaris team.  Last but certainly not least a much appreciated high five to the extended Sun Cluster team... including Keith "he's damn good" White.

Thursday Jan 31, 2008

Spending Time to Save $$$ or Spending $$$ to Save Time...

Mårten Mickos the CEO of MySQL hit upon a key trend occurring in the web core which is also known as SAAS, web hosting services,  the internet cloud, etc. . "Some people spend time to save $$$ and some people spend $$$ to save time."  In the open source arena the majority of folks (actually it's a pretty vast majority) are spending the time to save the $$$.  50,000 downloads a day of the most popular open sourced database is an eye opener.  That certainly sounds like a vibrant and active community to me!  People who help develop, enhance, promote, utilize, advocate, lead, govern, market, plan, discuss, etc. There is power in numbers  Are individuals using this database?  Yes in the droves.  Are companies using the database?  Wikipedia, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, SecondLife are using MySQL.  Would banks be interested in this technology alternative?  That is a good question.  Are some enterprise companies experimenting with CentOS today?  The answer is "yes."  Can you purchase commercial grade support on CentOS?  It is probably a barrier for certain application deployments in the enterprise today.  Seems like the potential is there... Commercial grade support from a Fortune 500 company can broaden the reach to new customers. A company that  generates new technology rather than simply gather and glue technology together in a distro can be an advantage as well as an attraction.

Does an open source business model want to shift enterprise customers from spending the time to spending the $$$.  Of course. When those customers are ready to do so on their terms because it is a business decision.  Think of "free" but drop the letter 'r' (for me it's easy since I'm from Boston) and you have "fee" for commercial grade deployment-- which typically means support, various service offerings and SLAs.  If you become "the" largest open source company in the world you drive for new and repeat customers via opportunities not by mouse traps.  Opportunities are generated by downloads, partners, OEMs and direct sales.  While the MySQL acquisition is subject to closing and regulation approvals it is clearly a move that complements nicely an existing software business that is growing.

How much data is currently being stored via this relational database?  I imagine it is many tables of stored data and many more tables of the relations between those tables of stored data.  Can MySQL help drive synergies with storage products and other offerings? 

A big yes.

This is making too much sense.


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The blog of Bob Porras - Vice President, Data, Availability, Scalability & HPC for Sun Microsystems, Inc.

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