Thursday Aug 06, 2009

CA$H for Wintel Clunkers and Common $ense

Classic Clunker with Cedarburg, WI county fair light reflections.

According to a CNN money article on the Cash for Clunkers program:
  • The trade-in vehicle has to get a combined city and highway fuel economy rating of 18 miles per gallon or less.
  • The average fuel economy of new vehicles being purchased under Cash for Clunkers is 25.4 mpg
  • The average fuel economy increase from the old vehicle to the new is about 61%.
For this 61% fuel economy improvement in a relative small percentage of the U.S. car fleet, $1 Billion has been spent and another $2 Billion may soon be wasted. There are a number of problems with this program.
  • U.S. fuel economy peaked in the late 1980s and vehicles exceeding 25 mpg have existed since AMC's 1959 Rambler, so only those who deliberatly chose the lowest mpg vehicles can avail of the program.
  • Those who chose economy cars and other respectably efficient vehicles (Civics, Festivas...) are punished to subsidize those who chose inefficient vehicles (Hummers, Vipers...), in effect it is a regressive tax!
  • The real mpg/person savings can be negative, for example when an 18mpg 8 passenger vehicle is replaced with a 25.4 mpg 4 passenger vehicle.
  • The program also ignores the fact that it takes energy to crush an old but serviceable car and replace it with a newly built car.

If the Cash For Clunkers program had instead been directed to encourage companies and individuals to junk their Wintel PCs and replace them with Sun Ray thin clients, there is a potential for a 97.5% decrease in energy consumption. So why isn't there a Cash for Clunkers program for desktop personal computers?

Monday Oct 13, 2008

2 PCs/day stolen in Racine schools, why not try Sun Ray?

Sad, school has only been in session a month and already 68 computers (enough for two or three classrooms) are gone... Educational PCs tend to be underutilized for a couple of years and just when teachers begin to understand how to integrate them into their curriculum, some local politician will push an agenda "IF only we used PC instead of Mac, Windows 98 instead of Windows 95, Apple IIe, Apple instead of Atari... then Johnny would be able to read!" I've heard of brand new computers sit in boxes for two years, becoming completely obsolete before they are ever used. It's possible that the excellent Apple audio/video capabilities which made these computers so attractive to thieves hadn't been used in the classroom yet. Some of these computers were purchased under a grant for the purposes of exam administration. I happen to know that the deployment/upgrade system was really well designed (by my brother ;-) and similar to a system I helped put together for an Irish bank. But Sun Rays might have been better for some of these purpose and would free up the Apples for the multimedia functions they excel at. Sun Rays have a much longer "shelf-life" than a typical P.C. or Mac. The first ones made in the late 1990s would be able to administer exams and display XP, Vista, Linux, Solaris applications just as well as the brand new ones. Upgrades would be system-wide and nearly instantaneous. Bad or stolen hardware could be swapped out by the teacher and ready to use in less than 5 minutes. The fact that Sun Rays are useless without a server should make them less likely to be stolen... [Read More]
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