Enabling core files on the Java Desktop System

My wife thought "Kernel Core Dump Analysis", the title of a course I took here, sounded like something a janitorial detective would do after Wisconsin state fair. Kernel core files can be used to diagnose problems with the kernel, though I must admit that I can't remember the last time I saw a Solaris or linux kernel crash. Application core files can be used to diagnose application crashes, but they are not be enabled by default in many GNU/linux distributions.
To enable core files on Java Desktop System on Linux:
1) Edit /etc/profile with gedit, vi or your favorite editor.

uncomment this line:
    ulimit -c 20000             # only core-files less than 20 MB are written

comment out this line:
#   ulimit -Sc 0                # don't create core files 
Now you have to make sure the application can write core files in the process's current working directory. To find the working directory of the process:
2) Get Process ID:
ps -e | grep {process name}

3) Find process's working diretory: 
ls -l /proc/{pid of process}/cwd

4) chmod the working directory to allow the process to write a core file there.  
Note for processes such as gconfd-2 which use '/' as their working directory, 
you might have to do something really horrible such as 'chmod 777 /'.  Yuck.

5) reboot
To enable core files for Java Desktop System 3 on Solaris:
Use coreadm
1) coreadm -e global -g /var/tmp/core.%f.%p
2) There is no step 2.
P.S. If you want to look at a core file without crashing your application, have a look at Solaris gcore(1).

Update:Added "-e global" flag to coreadm ensures that global core files are enabled.

Comments:

Is SUN still using SuSE core for JDS3, it has been troubled for years, I would ask why? Marc Gunther was talking about his latest literary work, 'Faith and Fortune', this morning. This fellow stated that a corporation is NOT about the customer, it is about your employees. 'Radical' thinking for business.

Posted by William R. Walling on May 21, 2005 at 07:52 AM GMT+00:00 #

JDS 3 is available on Solaris and will be available on GNU/linux. Customers and employees can choose whichever fits their needs. I dual boot on my laptop and can switch my Sun Ray client between Solaris and Linux in less than 2 seconds. If your hardware and applications are supported, I'll bet 90% of desktop users wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Actually that might be an interesting test, especially considering that even experts have confused JDS with a more popular O.S. I don't know of any popular linux distributions which have gcore or coreadm and I'm certain none has dtrace or zones, but SuSE does have decent hardware support, decent globalization (which Sun of improved upon) and has been quite successful outside of the U.S.

Posted by bnitz on May 21, 2005 at 04:18 PM GMT+00:00 #

1) Why should SUN 'join the crowd' modifying another GNU/Linux distribution? SuSE is SLACKWARE based code. (Note: MUNICH just booted SuSE for 'desktop' use. DEBIAN WON!) 2) SUN's OPEN SOLARIS should end any requirement for GNU/Linux distributions. Unfortunately, SOLARIS 10 for x86 doesn't run on my 'genuine INTEL' integrated hardware which works with RED HAT 9, FEDORA C3, UBUNTU 5.04 and MANDRAKE 10.1 software.

Posted by William R. Walling on May 21, 2005 at 05:32 PM GMT+00:00 #

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