Monday Feb 04, 2013

ADF Mobile and resource bundles

In my last post, I described the three bundle types available to ADF Developers. Last week, I learned that the ADF Mobile framework doesn't support all the choices offered by its server-side older brother. Only XLIFF bundles are available in the current version. You can read more about this here.

Sunday Jan 20, 2013

Internationalization: which bundle type is right for you?

Choice is one of the fundamental tenets of JDeveloper's approach to development. This probably explains why so many people on the OTN forums and the ADF Enterprise Methodology Group ask for guidance on picking the best alternative to handle specific use cases. Most of the time, the answer will start with: Well... It depends. Developer skills, functional requirements, performance expectations and other variables make it difficult to come up with a single, straightforward recommendation. This is the case with resource bundles. 

In the context of the Java platform, a resource bundle is simply a collection of objects related to a specific locale. Each object can be retrieved by its key, which must be unique among all the bundles available to an application. When a program needs a locale-specific resource, such as the string for an error message, it can load it from the resource bundle that is appropriate for the current user's locale. This mechanism allows you to write programs that can:

  • be easily localized, or translated, into different languages
  • handle multiple locales at once
  • be easily modified later to support even more locales
    Source: Javadoc for the ResourceBundle class. 

JDeveloper supports three different types of resource bundles: Java classes, .properties files and XLIFF files. All three behave exactly in the same way at runtime; choosing one type or the other will be completely transparent to the end user and will not likely impact performance or resource usage in a well-designed application. Why would you pick one type over the other, then?

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Thursday Dec 13, 2012

How to force ADF to speak your language (or any common language) in the logs

When I started working for Oracle, one of the first tasks I was given was to contribute some content to a great ADF course Frank and Chris are building. Among other things, they asked me to work on a module about Internationalization. While doing research work, I unearthed a little gem I had overlooked all those years. 

JDeveloper, as you may know, speaks your language - as long as your language is English, that is. Oracle ADF, on the other hand, is a citizen of the world. It is available in more than 25 different languages. But while this is a wonderful feature for end users, it is rather cumbersome for developers. Why is that? Have you ever tried to search the OTN forums for a solution with a non-English error message as your query? I have, once. But how can you force ADF to use English for its logging operations? 
[Read More]
About

Frédéric Desbiens

The musings of a member of the ADF Product Management team.

I focus here on my favorite development framework but also have a strong interest in Mobile Development, Oracle WebCenter and Oracle SOA Suite.

Attentive readers will even find posts about IT Strategy from time to time, an interest of mine since I completed my MBA in 2006.

The views expressed on this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.

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