SunMD Education: Train the Trainer

I ran into the SunMD team (Russ Rinfret, Chuck Perry, Carl Meske) over Sushi the other night. Russ mentioned they were in town doing training on the SunMD units in our Lousville campus and that I should drop by and see what the training is all about.

So, Friday I grabbed my camera and headed over to the campus to see how the training worked. It was a 4 day class where the various teams had hands-on training on every aspect of the SunMD. There were folks from Singapore, Australia, Japan, the United States and India in attendance, all working with live or soon to be live SunMD deployments. All totaled there were about 20 attendees.

The group worked on two SunMD units, one populated with Sun equipment and the other without any equipment in it.

There were also stations positioned around the SunMD units where teams could work in larger spaces on various Field Replaceable Units (FRUs). This particular station was where a team would work on a heat exchanger replacing fans, seeing how the plumbing works and a variety of other tasks that they may be expected to work on in the field (or in the mine as the folks from Japan may be expected to do).

The 4 days were packed with tips from the experts with Russ teaching about the FRUs, Carl teaching about the IMS (Integrated Management Server) and Chuck teaching about the EMS (Environmental Management System)...speaking of which, here is a shot of the EMS and IMS working together to ensure that the environment (heat, humidity, doors, drains, etc...) is correctly monitored. For those of you who think I just blog...yes, I worked for a while with Carl, Roger and Vanessa on the IMS.

Notice the reading on the front, 22.1 degrees Celsius (about 72 degrees Farenheit). When you go into the main corridor of the running unit, it is much warmer since the cool air flows around the SunMD racks and not through the center.

I also spent some time talking to and listening to the students (not as much as I would have hoped, but I'll drop in on the next class as well now that I know the classes will be offered more often as the units get deployed). One of the teams (including Yukio Kitano (Project Manager) and Mitsuaki Ohno (Support Engineer)) was from the Japanese project that is setting up SunMD in an old coal mine in Japan. They are starting with two as a prototype and may grow well beyond that.

The goal for the project is to get up to 30 SunMD units running unattended. The deployment will start with engineers and living quarters in the coal mine, but will migrate towards unattended operation (as it should be).

I stayed for the feedback session, all in all it sounds like a great class. Now I just have to wait for the next class and maybe find an excuse to attend end-to-end. I have to say I'm impressed with the shift of the box from internal project, through a stellar sales and marketing turn and into practical deployments. There are SunMD units going into virtually every corner of the globe (more on that another day).

Comments:

I would like to see the day when there are no more pictures of cluttered network cabling and equipment.

Why can't they be organized?

Posted by A. B. on November 29, 2008 at 10:47 PM MST #

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