Tuesday Dec 16, 2008

Link roundup before rebooting

The time has come for an OS upgrade to OSX 10.5.6, and as Firefox 3.1 beta 2 has kept up very well for a long time, I now have a huge number of tabs open. So here are some worth reporting on here, the rest are on my delicious feed.

I started looking into cloud computing and the semantic web and found a few really nice links:

  • Virtuoso cloud edition for Amazon's EC2 from OpenLink Software the company powering DBPedia and many of the Linked Data Cloud servers.
  • a new highly scalable java based semantic web database named Big Data which was presented at O'Reilly conference earlier this year (PDF of presentation). From their web site:

    Bigdata(R) is an open-source scale-out storage and computing fabric supporting optional transactions, very high concurrency, and very high aggregate IO rates. Bigdata was designed from the ground up as a distributed database architecture optimized for very high aggregate IO rates running over clusters of 100s to 1000s of machines, but can also run in a single-server mode. Bigdata offers a distributed file system, similar to the Google File System but also useful for workflow queues, a data extensible sparse row store, similar to Googles widely recognized bigtable project, and map/reduce processing for parallelizing data intensive workflows over a cluster.

    Bigdata(R) comes packaged with a very high-performance RDF store supporting RDF(S) and OWL Lite inference.[...]The Bigdata RDF Store was designed specifically to meet requirements for very large scale semantic alignment and federation.

    Looking around in their javadoc I found that they use the Sesame API

  • article by RedMonk on 15 ways to tell it's not cloud computing
  • The semantic grid project probably has some very good resources on cloud computing, so I should look there next.

I am sure there is more on that subject of cloud computing but that's what I have for now.

On social networks

For a bit of stimulation go look at Microsoft's rdf api.

Wednesday Dec 13, 2006

Microsoft does RDF

In a very interesting slideshow "The Dark Side of the Semantic Web" Jim Hendler points to Microsoft's "Connected Services Framework 3.0 Profile Manager" documentation.

There are two main benefits offered by a profile store that has been created by using RDF. The first is that RDF enables you to store data in a flexible schema so you can store additional types of information that you might have been unaware of when you originally designed the schema. The second is that it helps you to create Web-like relationships between data, which is not easily done in a typical relational database.

A little further

You must use the the Simple Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) to read profile information from Profile Manager. SPARQL is an industry standard. For more information, see What is SPARQL?

Via Jim Hendler's blog. See also Danny's post.

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