Wednesday Oct 09, 2013

Silicon Valley Code Camp Kids Track 2013




Silicon Valley Code Camp v8.0 concluded over the weekend. I've attended each code camp since the introduction of Java (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and now this one). The code camp has stuck to its three core principles from the beginning:
  • By and for the developer community (no product or marketing pitches ;)
  • No charge to attendees
  • Never occurs during work hours

The code camp has shown constant growth over its lifespan as is evident by the trends below:



The conference is definitely outgrowing its existing venue as the registrations had to be closed early for the first time.



It takes a village to organize a volunteer-driven conference and that has indeed been the case for all these years. The conference has been primarily focused on professional developers for all the past years. President Obama said

"If we want America to lead in the 21st century, nothing is more important than giving everyone the best education possible — from the day they start preschool to the day they start their career."

 So this year, other than my usual speaking engagements, I also volunteered to coordinate a new track focused on enabling future generation of developers. It was astounding to see kids from elementary school, middle school, and early high schoolers learning programming skills.

This new track had 16 sessions delivered by 8 speakers:
More details about the track are available here. About 200 kids attended stayed with their parents most of the day and enjoyed interacting with other attendees.

Here is some feedback we've heard so far:

Thank you very much for the great classes this past Sunday.  I had a lot of fun and learnt a lot.  I hope you have more of such classes so I can also have my friends attend with me.
Arun - thank you so much for volunteering your time and organizing such a fantastic event today!! My kids had a blast and quoting my 9-yr old son "Mom, this was the best experience I've ever had" :-) We would be interested in any future events you may be planning, one time or on-going.

Thanks again for the Minecraft Mod workshop yesterday; my son enjoyed it tremendously and I hope it will encourage him to learn how to program in coming years.  I also enjoyed it as it gave me some hints as to how Forge mod loader works.

We enjoyed the minecraft modding class yesterday as part of code camp.  My 11 year old has never coded (beyond Scratch) and he was up and hacking minecraft within the first hour.  Arun’s preparatory materials, teaching approach and engaging style made this a great experience.  I would definitely like to see more kid based courses in the future and would definitely recommend the minecraft session to anyone interested in modding.  I’d give the course 4 out of 5 stars.

A friend invited us this morning to SVCC, and although the room was packed, my son and I managed to get in and enjoyed learning more about Java coding.  Thanks for putting this class together, and for making opportunities like this for father/son activity related to computer literacy.  We had a good time, please keep it up for next year :-)

We loved kids sessions in code camp.  It motivated my kid programming.  Keep up the good work.

My 12 year and 8 years old sons has been coming to code camp for over 4 years now.  It has been fun all these years, however this year in their words "It was the best code camp ever!".  Thank you Peter K., Kevin Nilson, Arun Gupta and Stephen Chin and all other volunteers for excellent sessions!

"This was fun" says my 11 yr old son Aidan. As the dad, I've been spending some time with him at home building mods in Java and it's definitely a way to motivate him to learn programming.  He's been able to slog through some rather dry Java materials so that he can get better at Java programming. Re: the Minecraft class, you did a nice job of teaching theory and then connecting it to something applicable.

If you attended any of the sessions, we'd love to hear your feedback at kids@siliconvalley-codecamp.com.

Many thanks to co-track lead Dave Briccetti and other speakers: Neil Brown, Stephen Chin, Lynn Langit, Samantha Langit, Shadaj Laddad, Aditya Gupta, and Ron Verghis.

Check out some pictures from the event ...
























And complete album at:



The two days were very exhausting, but extremely rewarding and satisfying!

Follow at @arungupta and @devoxx4kidsba (Devoxx 4 Kids Bay Area) for any future updates on similar workshops!

Tuesday Oct 08, 2013

JavaOne 2013 Conference Report


18th JavaOne concluded a few days ago!

Started with a wet and cold #GeekBikeRide ...






... JUG Leaders and Java Champions brunch ....






... GlassFish Community Event ...






... Strategy and Technical Keynotes ...








... Duke Choice Awards ...






... GlassFish Party ...









... lots of friends from all around the world ...










.. several O'Reilly best-seller Java EE 7 Essentials book signings ...



... lots of Java EE 7 sessions, panels, and EG meetings ...









... couple of sessions on kids and programming ...



... Community Keynote ...







And who all did I meet ...

@myfear, @agoncal, @lincolnthree, @dblevins, @edburns, @fabiovelloso, @emmanuelbernard, @peter_pligrim, @javajuneau, @matthewmccull, @vanriper, @javaclimber, @reginatb38, @stephan007, @danieldeluca, @badrelhouari, @guatejug, @mnriem, @_tamanm, @reza_rahman, @jyeary, @noah_white, @heathervc, @tonyaraemoore, @evanchooly, @maxandersen, @brunoborges, @ingenthr, @javafxpert, @kohsukekawa, @mkheck, @donaldojdk, @venkat_s, @sjmaple, @trisha_gee, @goldstift, @ensode, @delabassee, @johanvos, @atsticks, @pbakker, @sander_mak, @bertertman, @mittie, @adambien, @stuartmarks, @wernerkeil, @yoshioterada, @harshadoak, @hirt, @smeyen, @yarasenger, @vsenger, @brjavaman, @fabianenardon, @maltron, @fguime, @speakjava, @danjavageek, @jj156416, @babadopulos, @chuggid, @webdevwilson, @mike_lehmann, @aa_lopez, @ameliaeiras, @soniazatoreilly, @codename_one, @sharat_chander, @steveonjava, @alexismp, @lightguardjp, @aslakknutsen, @kevin_farnham, @jodastephen, @geertjanw, @acaicedo, @ags313, @eyeseewaters, @briangoetz, @mreinhold, @spericas, @sonyabarry, @terrencebarr, @nivs333, @kittylyst, @robilad, @karianna, @ypoirier, @reza_rahman, @marek_potociar, @shaunsmith, @alexandrajava, @tnis23, @stevengharris, @gsaab, @cpurdy, @alrubinger, @bonbhel, @nilesh_, @anilgaur, @doug_clarke, @sachalabourey, @petrjiricka, @rogerk09, @jitsni, @singh_harpreet, @peppertech, @robc2, @rajivmordani, @vivekpandey, @jclingan, @javaperftuning, @michaelkolling, @cayhorstmann, @aalmiray, @ludoc, @paulsandoz, @bhlynne, @RockCimberT, @frankgreco, @meghanorm, @mullermarian, and many others ...

Here are the different slide decks and github repos ...

  1. CON-4456: Coding Java EE 7: Making Easy even Easier (github repo)
  2. HOL 2147: Java EE 7 Hands-on Lab
  3. CON 3496: Come Play! with Java EE 7 (github repo)
  4. BOF 8012: Teaching Java with Minecraft, Greenfoot, and Scratch
Watch the complete photo album:





And that's a wrap!

Monday Sep 16, 2013

JavaOne 2013: Java EE 7, GlassFish Community Event, Book Signing, Geek Bike Ride, Hallway Track, ...


18th JavaOne is almost here .... literally a few days away now!


5 days
8 tracks
500+ sessions
490+ speakers
70+ exhibitors
Lots of late night parties
All in the beautiful city of San Francisco

Now that is what makes a conference lot of fun and bound to give you a nerdgasm!

If you are still not convinced, here are 25 reasons to attend JavaOne.

There is tons of coverage on the recently released Java EE 7 and GlassFish 4. The FocusOn document provide a comprehensive set of sessions, BoFs, hands-on labs, panels, etc related to Java EE Platform from Oracle, RedHat, IBM, and many others.

This is going to be my 15th JavaOne and this blog has been serving reports/pictures from the conference for past 6 years (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012).

Here is my schedule so far and I would love to meet you before/after my speaking engagements:

Saturday, 9/21
11am
Geek Bike Ride
7:30pm
NetBeans Party

Sunday, 9/22
8am
JUG Leaders and Java Champions Brunch
9:15am
GlassFish Community Event
12pm
Strategy and Technical Keynote
8pm
GlassFish Party

Monday, 9/23
12:30pm
OTN Lounge Expert Drop-in
3pm
CON4456: Coding Java EE 7: Making Easy Even Easier (co-speaking with Lincoln Baxter III)
4:15pm
Java EE 7 Essentials Book Signing at JavaOne Book Store
6pm
JCP Party (including book signing)
8pm JUG Leaders and Java Champions Social Event
Tuesday, 9/24
12:15pm Publishers Seminar
2pm
Java EE 7 Essentials Book Signing at O'Reilly Booth
3pm
CON4510: Fifty Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes (co-speaking with Antonio Goncalves)
4:30pm BOF 8012: Teaching Java with Minecraft, Greenfoot, and Scratch (co-speaking with Daniel Green)
7:30pm HOL 2147: Java EE 7 Hands-on Lab (co-speaking with Antonio Goncalves, David Delabassee, and Marian Muller)
Wednesday, 9/25
10am CON3431: Introduce Java Programming to Kids (co-speaking with James Weaver)
1pm CON3496: Come and Play! with Java EE 7 (co-speaking with Antonio Goncalves)
2:30pm Java EE 8 Discussions
Thursday, 9/26
3:30pm
CON2406: Java EE 8 and Beyond (mostly observer)

And of course, there is always the hallway track!

Where will I see you ?

Tuesday Sep 03, 2013

Java EE 7 Launch Celebrations in Africa Trip Report


Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, and Uganda were the African four countries on my Make the Future Java EE 7 Global Celebrations tour. The event was organized by JUG AFRICA and Max Bonbhel covered a few other countries as part of this tour.



I was welcomed with a very warm African hospitality in each country. The JUG leaders took extreme care of me through out the stay, starting right from the airport pick up, organizing the events, working on logistics, and a multitude of other things. Remember, the JUG leader is a volunteer role but its the passion for technology and sharing with the community that drives them. And that was truly evident in each of them!

A big shout out to Badr Elhouari (Morocco), Mamadou Ngor Diouf (Senegal), Mark Clark and Richard Kolb (South Africa), and Nsubuga Hassan (Uganda) for being the wonderful hosts!

I had lots of opportunities to engage with African developers from all around the continent. Yes, Africa is a continent with 54 different countries! Typically, locals talk about North, East, West, and South Africa regions. I was fortunate to share some of my Java EE 7 knowledge in all four regions, and in return learned a lot more from them.

The format at each event was mostly similar - provide a code-driven introduction to Java EE 7 and keep it completely interactive. I truly believe that the code should be written such that it speaks for itself. The developer productivity enhancements made in the Java EE platform over the years have certainly made it very much a reality. A typical flow covered the following samples, in a completely interactive manner:
There was barely noticeable to no language barrier in all the countries that I visited. This truly allowed a frank and direct conversation with the developers, as opposed to using a translator.


The trip started with the first event in Casablanca, Morocco (North Africa). Badr took time out of his family vacation to receive me at the airport and ensuring a smooth operation of the event. There were about 50 developers during a week day evening and otherwise a general holiday season.

The interactive session had several existing Java EE developers. Riding a train from Rabat to Casablanca with a few of the JUG members gave a good 1-1 time to interact with them. One of the developers showed me a sample application he has built to prepare for Java certification. One of the common feelings in Morocco at least is that their sub-Saharan bretherens are preferred for any Africa-wide events. However I started my trip with North Africa, so no complaints there ;-)

Something to learn about Morocco ...
  • Sahara Desert is about 900 km from Rabat/Casablanca. Plan for a few days if you are interested in a desert safari
  • Cars are used to travel from/to airport, not camels ;-)
  • Don't miss out on visiting one of the Kasbah, they are very unique and colorful structures
Here are some pictures from that event:



JMaghreb is the biggest Java developer conference in North Africa. I attended their inaugural conference last year and had a really good time giving a Java EE 6 hands-on lab to a packed room. The conference is focused towards a "pragmatic developer", not necessarily using all the bleeding-edge technologies. Badr has already started planning for JMaghreb 2.0 (Nov 7 and 8) and planning to expand the outreach to Southern Europe and other neighborhood countries. Reach out to him if you are interested in speaking at that event, and of course register for this free conference.



The next stop of the trip was at Dakar, Senegal. There were about 30 developers for the Saturday morning event. On the request of JUG leader, I started the event with a slide deck providing a complete overview of the platform. And then showed a bunch of samples afterwards. The Java EE 7 Technical Kit provides a slide deck (with speaker notes) that you can use to talk about Java EE 7 at your local JUG. The attendees were not shy in asking questions and the session continued with code-driven talk afterwards.

 I was fortunate to bump into couple of passionate GlassFish developers who are using it for a local telecom company. Hear all about their passion around Java EE 6, GlassFish, and NetBeans:



Here are some pictures from that event:






Some things to learn about Senegal ...
  • Senegal visa can be obtained at the airport, but be prepared to "grease" the machinery
  • Arrange a pick up at the airport otherwise you'll be overwhelmed with the cabbies
  • Visit Rebirth of Africa monument in Dakar, it is very very inspiring


The next stop of the trip was at Johannesburg, South Africa. Nobody amongst ~100 developers wanted to see any slides and so we jumped straight into the code. I showed lots of code and had lots of interaction.

I also had the opportunity to visit The Wanderers, a cricket stadium known for the second highest one day total of 438 by South Africa. I spent significant part of my day at the office and that's where the event was hosted in the evening as well.

Some things to learn about South Africa ...
  • Johannesburg, with about 4.4 million population, is definitely a premier technology hub in all of Africa
  • Being far South, they sort of feel in a silo and not completely connected from rest of the world. This is in spite of the fact that there is decent Internet connectivity.
  • Startup culture is definitely prominent here - products are serving local needs because of infrastructure costs, otherwise services-based
Here are some pictures from that event:








The last stop of the trip was at Kampala, Uganda. Nsubuga Hassan picked me from the Entebbe airport and we shared a 1.5 hrs taxi ride to the hotel in Kampala. The number of women participants truly surpassed the number of men at the event, and this was truly impressive. Its probably the most number of women I've ever seen at a JUG meetup.

There was even a discussion around starting a new Kampala JUG, so that is definitely promising.

The event was hosted by Hivecolab which provides community-owned work environment for young tech entrepreneurs in Kampala. Had a good chat with program director Barbara who is also also leading Women in Technology Uganda. Listen to an interesting conversation with Barbara on promoting technology amongst women in Uganda.

Some things to learn about Uganda ...
  • English is the official language of the country, and has about 40+ other local dialects
  • People are extremely soft-spoken and very welcoming every where
  • Lot of tech innovation happening in Uganda - Mobile Monday Kampala, @The Hub, Fin Africa, and others
  • Local government encourages women to study at the university

I enjoyed riding the different local means of transport - boda boda and the van. The visit to the local arts and craft market in any part of world not only promotes local artisans but also gives you the opportunity to buy authentic goods.

Here are some pictures from that event:







All the Java EE 7 samples are available at github.com/arun-gupta/javaee7-samples. Feel free to clone the repository or send a pull request if you want to contribute new Java EE 7 samples. A recording of some of the samples can be seen in the videos recorded at an earlier conference:





Even though the local JUG leaders were my hosts in each country but the real force behind all of this was Lamine Ba and Max Bonbhel. I had numerous emails exchanges on dates, cities, hotels, and everything else and they were all dealt very promptly and in a professional manner. Max and Lamine - you are the agents of change in Africa and are truly helping African developers be visible at the global front, thanks for your efforts!

I truly enjoyed my short stay in different countries and would love to come back again!

Here is the complete album from the trip:



If you want to learn more about African developers, or contribute then there is an excellent panel "BOF3469: Java Trends in Africa" at JavaOne San Francisco (Sep 22-26).

Register and see ya there!

Monday Aug 19, 2013

Java EE 7 in Africa



As part of Make the Future Java EE 7 Global Celebration, several of us (Reza Rahman, Bruno Borges, and David Delabassee) are traveling around the world and speaking at different events. My latest travelenture takes me to different parts of Africa, literally in all different directions.




When ? Where ?
8/22
Rabat, Morocco
8/24
Dakar, Senegal
8/26
Johannesburg, South Africa
8/28
Kampala, Uganda

I plan to show tons of Java EE 7 code samples, meet local developers, learn from them, hopefully run with some of the finest runners in the world, and other fun things!



Where will I see you ?

Sunday Jul 21, 2013

Geek Bike Ride at JavaOne Shanghai

Here are some pictures from the fun #GeekBikeRide at JavaOne Shanghai. Thank you InfoQ China, bike angels, and everybody else who made the ride so much fun!
















And the evolving album from JavaOne Shanghai so far ...


Wednesday Apr 17, 2013

Suggestions for Java EE and Cloud Track at JavaOne 2013: CFP ends Apr 23




JavaOne Call for Papers has been extended and now will close on April 23. There are eight tracks to submit your talks:
  • Client and Embedded Development with JavaFX
  • Core Java Platform
  • Edge Computing with Java in Embedded, Smart Card, and IoT applications
  • Emerging Languages and the Java Virtual Machine
  • Securing Java
  • Java Development Tools and Techniques
  • Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
  • Java Web Services and the Cloud

A complete description of each track is provided here. Five different kind of sessions can be submitted for each track:

  • Conference Session: A 60-minute session presented by Oracle, customers, partners, developers, and/or user group members
  • Panel: A 60-minute session presented in a panel format by multiple speakers consisting of Oracle, customers, partners, developers, and/or user group members
  • Tutorials: A 2 hour speaker led session where the presenter literally show attendees a live "How to" tutorial, and attendees can ask questions to the presenter during this. It doesn't require the attendee to have any equipment whatsoever. Ideally, the attendee should be listening and taking notes.
  • Birds of a Feather (BOFs): A  60-minute session that allows a closer interaction with the speakers and attendees focusing on a particular aspect of technology.
  • Hands-on Lab (HOL): A two-hour hands-on, interactive lab session
We've seen a good response to paper submission so far and really thankful for that!

You've a few more days to submit your talks. As a track co-lead for Java EE and Cloud tracks, here are some talks that I'd like to see there:
  • Anything related to WebSocket, JSON, Concurrency, Batch, HTML5, Persistence, Dependency Injection, Transactions ?
  • Do you have a creative use of Java EE technologies in your applications ?
  • Are you an extreme believer in Java EE and use most of the components for creating world-class applications ?
  • Are you using multiple application servers in your deployment environment ?
  • Do you have any experience of migrating from earlier versions of J2EE to Java EE ? Tutorials here would be nice.
  • Do you want to show value of standards-based application development over proprietary frameworks ?
  • Are you building support for Java EE 7 in your applications already ?
  • Performance, monitoring, testing, development, deployment strategies ?
  • Any other enterprise Java technologies from the ecosystem ?
  • Real case studies on how Java EE helped you deliver on time, within budget, and stay competitive
And now some suggestions for the Cloud track:
  • How are your Java services powering web and cloud ?
  • Anything related to REST/SOAP Web services and design patterns ?
  • How is Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) helping you realize the benefits ?
  • Do you have an interesting deployment topology across your private and public cloud ?
  • Do you have a case study showing why a particular deployment scenario works ?
  • Are you exposing services at IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS layers and share guidelines on them ?
  • How are you simplifying DevOps ?
  • How are you using BigData in development and deployment ?
  • Anything related to NoSQL ? Using a mix of NoSQL and RDBMS ?
Keep the job of Content Review Committe interesting, demanding, and challenging. Submit as many sessions as you can before April 23rd 11:50pm PT.

Read the content review process and tips for submission from 2 years ago to improve your chances of getting a paper selected.

Submit now!

Thursday Feb 07, 2013

Jfokus 2013 Trip Report - A Magnificent Spectacle


This was my third consecutive year (2012, 2011) at Jfokus and the organizing committee, and Mattias Karlsson in particular, continue to amaze me every year! As one of my colleague mentioned, it truly has become a "magnificent spectacle".

With the conference sold out 2 weeks before the official start, 1550 attendees from 20+ countries were delighted by a barrage of international speakers. This was the biggest Jfokus ever and the bar has always gone higher from the previous years.

The conference kickstarted with a guided tour of Old Town Stockholm and was a good way to get familiar with history of the city.






The conference had hands-on lab on the first day and technical sessions, BoFs, HackerGarten, NightHacking, Swedish massage by Mejsla and other activities on day 2 and 3. Even though the conference had several tracks but the best track is always the "hallway track" which gives you the unique opportunity to engage with other attendees of the conference.

Markus and I delivered a lab on "Developing JAX-RS Web Applications Utilizing Server-sent Events and WebSockets". Geertjan also showed up at the lab and helped out with general NetBeans questions. The lab guide is available and the complete source code can be downloaded here. Note, the lab works on GlassFish 4.0 build 57 for now because of the pending bugs in SSE implementation in Jersey.

The last 45 minutes of the lab had a different section covering some other Java EE 7 technologies. The lab guide is available at bit.ly/javaee7-hol (PDF) and the starting code is available at bit.ly/javaee7-hol-code (ZIP). For now, this particular lab covers:

This lab is a work in progress and a more comprehensive feature set will be integrated and shared at future conferences (yes, several are already planned!). Let me know if you'll be interested in reviewing the contents and providing feedback.

Here are some pics from the lab session:






The conference also had its first #GeekRun. 7 of us ran in sub-zero temperature in the dark around the island and it was a great experience!



Here is the running route:



The evening concluded with an outstanding speakers' dinner at F12. The hospitality of the restaurant, warmth of the Jfokus events team, and company of some of the finest geeks in the world made the evening memorable. Some pics from the dinner ...






I delivered a session on The Java EE 7 Platform: Productivity++ and Embracing HTML5. There were about 100+ attendees for the 9am session. It gave a quick overview of the features coming in Java EE 7:
  • Java API for WebSocket
  • Java API for JSON Processing
  • Concurrency Utilities for Java EE
  • Batch Applications for Java Platform
  • JAX-RS 2.0
  • JMS 2

And several other technologies which are getting an update. The complete slides are available:

 

The session also showed a quick demo of the latest NetBeans build supporting Java EE 7.

In How to participate in the future of Java, I talkd about how several JUGs are contributing to Adopt-a-JSR efforts around Java EE 7. There are 19 JUGs from around the world that are participating in this effort. What is your JUG waiting for ? Join the momentum now!

Here are some more pictures from the conference:







The conference collected feedback for each talk using green, red, and yellow cards, a concept first found in Oredev. As explained in the opening keynote, the rule is getting green cards is good, yelllow card means so so and red card means the speaker is not coming back to the conference. Here are the cards that I received after my talk on Java EE 7:



I've heard the rumor that Nordic conferences don't like to repeat speakers for more than 2-3 years in a row. This was my third year but hey, the cards are all green. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for next year ;-)

Anyway, congratulations once again Mattias and team for a job very well done!

And the complete photo album:

Friday Dec 21, 2012

JavaOne 2013 Russia, India, China, USA: Save the Date


JavaOne

Moscow, Russia: April 23-24, 2013*

Hyderabad, India: May 8-9, 2013*

Shanghai, China: Jul 23-25, 2013*

San Francisco, USA: Sep 22-26, 2013*

* The dates are subject to change.

Venue, Agenda, CFP, and other details to come later.

Did you know that recording of all Technical Sessions from JavaOne San Francisco 2012 is available ? Watch them there!


Monday Dec 10, 2012

JavaOne Latin America 2012 is a wrap!


Third JavaOne in Latin America (2010, 2011) is now a wrap!

Like last year, the event started with a Geek Bike Ride. I could not attend the bike ride because of pre-planned activities but heard lots of good comments about it afterwards. This is a great way to engage with JavaOne attendees in an informal setting. I highly recommend you joining next time!

JavaOne Blog provides a a great coverage for the opening keynotes. I talked about all the great set of functionality that is coming in the Java EE 7 Platform. Also shared the details on how Java EE 7 JSRs are willing to take help from the Adopt-a-JSR program.

glassfish.org/adoptajsr bridges the gap between JUGs willing to participate and looking for areas on where to help. The different specification leads have identified areas on where they are looking for feedback. So if you are JUG is interested in picking a JSR, I recommend to take a look at glassfish.org/adoptajsr and jump on the bandwagon.




The main attraction for the Tuesday evening was the GlassFish Party. The party was packed with Latin American JUG leaders, execs from Oracle, and local community members. Free flowing food and beer/caipirinhas acted as great lubricant for great conversations. Some of them were considering the migration from Spring -> Java EE 6 and replacing their primary app server with GlassFish. Locaweb, a local hosting provider sponsored a round of beer at the party as well. They are planning to come with Java EE hosting next year and GlassFish would be a logical choice for them ;)








I heard lots of positive feedback about the party afterwards. Many thanks to Bruno Borges for organizing a great party!

Check out some more fun pictures of the party!

Next day, I gave a presentation on "The Java EE 7 Platform: Productivity and HTML 5" and the slides are now available:




With so much new content coming in the plaform:
  • Java Caching API (JSR 107)
  • Concurrency Utilities for Java EE (JSR 236)
  • Batch Applications for the Java Platform (JSR 352)
  • Java API for JSON (JSR 353)
  • Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356)

And JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339) and JMS 2.0 (JSR 343) getting major updates, there is definitely lot of excitement that was evident amongst the attendees. The talk was delivered in the biggest hall and had about 200 attendees.

Also spent a lot of time talking to folks at the OTN Lounge.

The JUG leaders appreciation dinner in the evening had its usual share of fun.






Day 3 started with a session on "Building HTML5 WebSocket Apps in Java". The slides are now available:


The room was packed with about 150 attendees and there was good interaction in the room as well. A collaborative whiteboard built using WebSocket was very well received. The following tweets made it more worthwhile:

A WebSocket speek, by @ArunGupta, was worth every hour lost in transit. #JavaOneBrasil2012, #JavaOneBr
@arungupta awesome presentation about WebSockets :)

The session was immediately followed by the hands-on lab "Developing JAX-RS Web Applications Utilizing Server-Sent Events and WebSocket". The lab covers JAX-RS 2.0, Jersey-specific features such as Server-Sent Events, and a WebSocket endpoint using JSR 356. The complete self-paced lab guide can be downloaded from here.

The lab was planned for 2 hours but several folks finished the entire exercise in about 75 mins. The wonderfully written lab material and an added incentive of Java EE 6 Pocket Guide did the trick ;-)






I also spoke at "The Java Community Process: How You Can Make a Positive Difference". It was really great to see several JUG leaders talking about Adopt-a-JSR program and other activities that attendees can do to participate in the JCP. I shared details about Adopt a Java EE 7 JSR as well.




The community keynote in the evening was looking fun but I had to leave in between to go through the peak Sao Paulo traffic time :)

Enjoy the complete set of pictures in the album:



About

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Arun Gupta is a technology enthusiast, a passionate runner, author, and a community guy who works for Oracle Corp.


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